Up On The Housetop: A Family Picture Album

Snapshots!

Howard Lee Beall at approximately six months of age. Taken summer 1938, Sykesville, Maryland

Howard Lee Beall at approximately six months of age. Taken summer 1938, Sykesville, Maryland

Barbara Ann Inman, taken at two months of age ca. July 1943, Cedar Rapids Iowa

Barbara Ann Inman, taken at two months of age ca. July 1943, Cedar Rapids Iowa

Our parents: Gordon Loren Inman and Elva Gail Spence Inman; Edward L. Beall, Sr. and Mildred Lee Warfield Beall

Our parents: Gordon Loren Inman and Elva Gail Spence Inman; Edward L. Beall, Sr. and Mildred Lee Warfield Beall. Our wedding April 25, 1964, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Brian (age 4) and Debbie (age 2)), taken December 1974, Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Brian and Debbie, taken December 1973, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

 

 

Brian, LuAn and Brandon, taken Christmas 1991/2, Broomfield, Colorado

Brian, LuAn and Brandon, taken Christmas 1991/2, Broomfield, Colorado. They were married in Broomfield March 9, 1991.

Debbie and Dee's Wedding, August 22, 1992, Broomfield, Colorado

Debbie and Dee’s Wedding, August 22, 1992, Broomfield, Colorado

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group shot taken in our driveway Christmas 2005: Brian, Jason, LuAn, Brandon, Trinity, Joshua, Debbie, Howard and Mandy

Group shot taken in our driveway Christmas 2005: Brian, Jason, LuAn, Brandon, Trinity, Joshua, Debbie, Howard and Mandy

 

 

Debbie and Dee, Joshua, Jason and Mandy. Taken about 2003.

Debbie and Dee, Joshua, Jason and Mandy. Taken about 2003.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Howard teaching Brandon's daughter, Trinity, how to make a dove call. Taken in Broomfield, Colorado about 2006.

Howard teaching Brandon’s daughter, Trinity, how to make a dove call. Taken in Broomfield, Colorado about 2006.

Brandon's daughters Brooke and Delaney. Taken in Broomfield, Colorado Christmas 2009

Brandon’s daughters Brooke and Delaney. Taken in Broomfield, Colorado Christmas 2009

 

Joshua and Dallas at their high school graduation, May 2012

Joshua and Dallas at their high school graduation, May 2012

Dee, Jason and Brian at Jason's high school graduation May 2014

Dee, Jason and Brian at Jason’s high school graduation May 2014

 

Mandy and her prom date May 2014. She will be graduating this spring.

Mandy and her prom date May 2014. She will be graduating this spring.

 

 

Brian has been battling cancer this past year. Debbie has been the "Chief Supporting Officer."

Brian has been battling cancer this past year. Debbie has been the “Chief Supportive Officer.”

Team Brian: Debbie, Brian, Mandy, Dallas, Jason, Dee, LuAn, Joshua

Team Brian: Debbie, Brian, Mandy, Dallas, Jason, Dee, LuAn, Joshua. Debbie organized a Gofundme account for Brian as he wages his war against cancer. With Team Brian on his side, Brian will win his war!!

 Wishing each of you a blessed holiday season. May you have a wonderful Christmas and a happy and joyous New Year 2016.

Barbara and Howard Beall

Christmas 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Search For Sarah Snow (1780-1830)–Wife of Daniel Inman (1776-1848)

Dr. Rex Swett (1938-2015)--a key to the Sarah Snow mystery

Dr. Rex Swett (1938-2015)–a key to the Sarah Snow mystery

 

You may remember Dr. Swett, our friend who passed away in August, 2015. I wrote an earlier tribute to him and will post a link to that article HERE.  The last two weeks have been quite eventful on at least three family lines I have been working on lately. All three of those lines have resulted in positive DNA matches from people from those lines with similar names. Dr. Swett provided the capstone on the Sarah Snow issue I have been researching. But before I go into his connection, I will discuss Sarah Snow. She has been a “problem” for everyone for years. She was also my third great grandmother.

For years, the only things known about Sarah were her year of birth (ca. 1780), and her year of death (abt 1830) as well as her first name (Sarah). She was also the wife of my third-great grandfather, Daniel Inman (1776-1848). My first introduction to Sarah came through my cousin, Charles Inman’s genealogical work: Daniel Inman of Connecticut, Ontario, N.Y., and Sugar Grove, Ill. and His Descendants ca. 1776- ca. 1976 with Ancestral Notes to the Early Seventeeth Century. Charles discovered that Daniel Inman had one wife named Sarah with a possible last name of Snow or White, but no one knew which name was accurate(1). Since then, people have provided three alternatives:

  1. Her name was either Snow or White: the original opinion
  2. Daniel had two wives, both named Sarah: Sarah Snow and Sarah White
  3. A third alternative for the mother of Daniel’s son, Nelson Proctor Inman–Sarah Proctor.

Daniel Inman had only one wife named Sarah, whose surname was either Snow or White. Finding her true identity has been a major headache. When I first began working on my tree years ago, I listed her as Sarah Snow, but I couldn’t find any verification of that. So I changed it to Sarah White. Recently when I discovered the “Sarah Proctor” suggestion, I investigated it and could find no one by that name. I believe that two of Daniel Inman’s sons were named for close friends: David Trumbull Inman and Nelson Proctor Inman. I found a David Trumbull and a Proctor family living in Ontario, New York when the Inmans lived there. And that was after Daniel’s marriage to Sarah in Massachusetts. That’s when I changed my tree to Sarah Snow/White and decided to give it a rest for a while. When Ancestry’s DNA kit became available, I decided to take advantage of an end-of-the year offer. One thing I noticed early about the DNA matches I received is that if I’m stirring up a nest on the tree and if I’m heading in the right direction, the number of matches I receive verify what I am doing.

So why not try Sarah Snow? I decided.

I spent about a week rebuilding that section of the tree including a Snow family I thought could have been Sarah’s. That was a huge undertaking but about a week later, the direct matches started coming in not only for Sarah’s Snow line, but for her mother’s Chubb/Cobb line as well. Sarah’s parents were Jonathan Snow (1752-1800) and Hannah Chubb (1749-1800) of Ashford, Windham, Connecticut.  Jonathan’s parents were Joseph Snow (1713-1787) and Abigail Sarah Cornel (Cornell/Cornwall) (1712-1797). Hannah Chubb’s parents were William Prentice Chubb (1723-1753) and Rachel Squire (b. 1723), and her grandparents were Joseph Chubb (1690-1732) and Mehitable Preston/Presson (b. 1690) and Philip Squire (1671-1747) and Elizabeth Fuller (1692-1800).

Here is Sarah’s Story

According to the Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records, the Barbour Collection, Jonathan Snow and Hannah Chubb were married in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut on March 30, 1733(2). Their children follow:

  1. Jonathan Snow, Jr. (1774-1820). Jonathan was born January 21, 1774 in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut(3), and he died between 1810 and 1820 in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut.  His wife was Relief Johnson (1773-1831). Their children were: (a) Annie Snow (b. 1794); (b) Alice Snow (b. 1797); (c) Hezekiah Snow (1798-1842); (d) Hannah Snow–no additional information.
  2. Eunice Snow (1776-1850). Eunice was born April 6, 1776 in Connecticut(4), and she died April 25, 1860 in Gibson, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania. Her husband was Jesse Ames (1780-1861). Their children were: (a) Roswell Squire Ames (1800-1886); (b) Levi Ames (1804-1805); (c) Simeon Ames (1806-1806); (d) Margaret Philena Ames (1807-1871); (e) Otis Ames (1809-1871); (f) Jasper Ames (1811-1887); (g) Chauncey Ames (1813-1848); (h) Annis Ames (1817-1878)
  3. Annis Snow (b. 1778). Annis was born May 1, 1778 in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut(5). I have no additional information about her.
  4. Sarah Snow (1780-1830). Under discussion here.
  5. Willard Snow (1782-1784). Willard was born December 30, 1782 in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut(6), and he died July 28, 1784 in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut(7).
  6. Dudley Snow (1784-1830). Dudley was born September 30, 1784 in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut(8), and he died at sea in 1830. His wife was Mary Polly Penhallow (1787-1848). Dudley fought in the War of 1812(9). Their children were: (a) Abijah Rockwell Snow (1810-1892); (b) William D. V. Snow (1812-1900); (c) Parmelia Snow (b. 1821); (d) Daniel Pinney Snow (1825-1902); (e) James Snow (1828-1898).

There is some dispute about the location of Sarah’s birth. Some people list it as Woodstock, Windham, Connecticut, although her family appears to have lived in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut. Had she been born in Ashford, her name would have been listed in the town records there. The other children are listed there. So it is possible Sarah was born in Woodstock if her family had moved there briefly.  Sarah was born in 1780 in Woodstock, Windham, Connecticut, and she died in after the 1830 Census in either Kane County, Illinois or in Ontario, New York(10). I don’t think Hannah Chubb was healthy after Sarah’s birth and was unable to care for the infant. That’s where the White family enters the picture. Jonathan Snow and Daniel White were close friends, if not actually related.  And this family would raise Sarah, possibly giving her their name–the reason for the Snow/White controversy.

The son of Jonathan White (1711-1795) and Sarah Bacon (1718-1795), Daniel White (1746-1804) was born April 3, 1746 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(11), and he died June 30, 1804 in Windsor, Massachusetts. His wife was Mehitable Cummins (1749-1822). I need to mention here that I have received a number of DNA confirmations for Daniel’s Bacon ancestors–Thomas Bacon (1640-1701)–and Mary Gamlin (1641-1741). They were Daniel’s great-grandparents on his mother’s Bacon line. Those matches descend via the Carpenter line to the Inmans and not via the Whites. [Note: Daniel Inman and Sarah Snow’s son, Loren Inman, married Lucy Carpenter. Thomas Bacon and Mary Gamlin were Lucy Carpenter’s third great grandparents. And I have a third connection with Thomas and Mary via the Chaffee line. That line also connects with the Carpenters. I will be writing about Loren Inman and Lucy Carpenter later.]

On June 30, 1768, Daniel White married Mehitable Cummins in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(12). Their children follow:

  1. Jonathan White (1769-1839). Jonathan was born April 15, 1769 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(13), and he died in Massachusetts in 1839. His wife was Bathsheba Webster (1771-1841). Their children were: (a) Paul White (1792-1862) and (b) Apollus White (1794-1864).
  2. Danforth White (1771-1842). Danforth was born April 9, 1771 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(14), and he died in Windsor, Berkshire, Massachusetts in 1841. His wife was Mary Dresser (1773-1843). Their children were: (a) John White (1795-1865); (b) Laura Cummins White (1800-1870); (c) Mary Warner White (1801-1871); (d) Daniel Danforth White (1806-1876); (e) Roland White (1807-1877); (f) Ward Cotton White (1810-1880); (g) Walter Watts White (1812-1882); and (h) Samuel Lyman White (1815-1885).
  3. Anna White (1773-1847). Anna was born June 1, 1773 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(15), and she died in May 1847 in Burlington Springs, Otsego, New York. Her husband was Royal Ross (1769-1813). They had a son: (a) Abel Clark Ross (1800-1875).
  4. Elizabeth White (1775-1845). Elizabeth was born September 5, 1775 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(16), and she died in Scipio, Jennings, Indiana in 1845. Her husband was Zephaniah French (1769-1852). Their children were: (a) Franklin Robinson French (1808-1880) and (b) Artemia French (1812-1846).
  5. Daniel White (1777-1836). Daniel was born December 25, 1777 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(17), and he died May 6, 1836 in Gorham, Ontario, New York. His wife was Mary Polly Ford (1778-1847). Their children were: (a) Mary Polly White (1805-1874); (b) Captain Daniel Ford White (1807-1877); (c) Eliza Ann White (1808-1877); (d) Benjamin Ford White (1811-1855); (e) Harriet White (1812-1881); (f) Silva White (1814-1816); (g) Sarah Ann White (1816-1887); (h) Hetta White (1818-1838); (i) Walter White (1820-1822); (k) infant White (born 1803).
  6. Twins born February 13, 1780
    1. Sarah Polly White (1780-1781). Sarah was born February 13, 1780 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(18), and she died November 7, 1781 in Promfret, Windham, Connecticut(19).
    2. Mehitable White (1780-1841). Mehitable was born February 13, 1780 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(20), and she died January 2, 1841 in Lyme, Huron, Ohio. Her husband was Lemuel Morse, Sr. (1779-1854). Their children were: (a) Lucia Morse (1801-1825); (b) Morgan Louis Morse (1804-1876); (c) Elias Morse (1806-1820); (d) Walter White Morse (1808-1891); (e) Lemuel Morse (1811-1889; (f) Melissa L. Morse (1813-1845); (g) Charles Carroll Morse (1815-1886); (h) Adniram Judson Morse (1818-1864); (Lucinda Morse (1821-1854).
  7. Dorcas White (1782-1847). Dorcas was born July 10, 1782 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(21), and she died August 9, 1847 in Auburn, Huron, Ohio. Her husband was David Carlisle (1780-1850). Their children were: (a) Harvey Cummins Carlisle (1806-1877); (b) Sally Olivia Carlisle (1808-1814); (c) Laura Ann Carlisle (1809-1898); (d) Mehetable Carlisle (1819-1907); (e) David O. Carlisle (1819-1869); (f) Deloss W. Carlisle (1823-1857).
  8. Walter White (1784-1812). Walter was born December 18, 1784 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(22), and he died October 15, 1812 in Connecticut. I do not have any additional information for him.
  9. Resolved White (1787-1875). Resolved was born March 31, 1787 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(23), and he died April 5, 1875 in Auburn, Huron, Ohio. His wife was Lucy Searle (1787-1874). Their children were: (a) Philo White (1822-1827); (b) Elizabeth White (1823-1895); (c) Walter William White (1825-1825); (d) Infant Son White (1825-1825)–apparently the Infant Son and Walter William were twins. Neither survived; (e) Resolved Hector White (1827-1827); (f) Baby Boy White (1829-1829); (g) Lucy White (1831-1917).
  10. Artemesia White (1789-1847). Artemesia was born July 4, 1789 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(24), and he died December 7, 1847 in Mantua, Portage, Ohio. Her husband was Hezekiah May (1782-1854). I have no additional information about them.
  11. Twins born December 17, 1792–[Note: The Whites used the same names as the twins born in 1780]:
    1. Sarah Polly White (1792-1840). Sarah was born December 17, 1792 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(25), and she died April 4, 1840 in Auburn Twp., Huron, Ohio. Her husband was George Hammond (1790-1860). Their children were: (a) Albert Hammond (1813-1885); (b) George Hammond (1824-1851).
    2. Mehitable White (1792-1837). Mehitable has been the mystery of the twins. I have her birth record, but I really had to dig to find the rest of the information. Daniel White died in 1799. It is possible the twins moved in with other families. That is the reason why so little information is available about them. Mehitable was born December 17, 1792 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(26, and she died September 8, 1837 in Auburn, Cayuga, New York. Her husband was Amos Underwood (1791-1846). Their children were: (a) George Underwood (1816-1859); (b) Henry Underwood (b. 1817); (c) Jane Underwood (1819-1870); (d) Emily Underwood (1822-1905); (e) Mehetable Underwood (1824-1874); (f) Mary Underwood (1828-1890); (g) M. Charles Underwood (1828-1892); (h) John Underwood (1831-1903); (i) Amos Underwood (1836-1907). After Mehitable’s death, Amos married Eliza Spink (1807-1878). They had two children: (a) Nicholas S. Underwood (1839-1864) and (b) Eliza Underwood (1840-1917). According to Amos Underwood’s Find-a-Grave Entry:  “Died: In Auburn on the 23d ult., Amos Underwood, Esq. A long-time resident. Had been a convert to Universalism for about 12 years. Left a yearly annuity for the Universalist church in Auburn. Funeral by Rev. G[eo.] W. Montgomery of Rochester in the absence of his pastor Rev. J[ohn] M. Austin. (abstract from Evangelical Magazine & Gospel Advocate, Utica NY, 10 Jul 1846, a Universalist newspaper)(27).”

 

***

The exact date of Sarah Snow’s moving from the Snow household to the White household is unknown, but I suspect it was after the death of their twin daughter, Sarah Polly White, who was born in 1780 and who died in 1781. The Whites were devastated over the death of their daughter. Baby Sarah was the first child to die in that family. And Sarah Snow’s mother Hannah Chubb Snow was very ill. The Whites were delighted to have young Sarah join their family. They would raise her as their own, and they may have adopted her. Hannah Chubb Snow gave birth to a son named Willard (1782-1784)–but he died around the age of two.  The Snows had one more son–Dudley–who was born in 1784 and who lived until 1830. Jonathan Snow and his wife Hannah Chubb both died in Ashford, Windham, Connecticut in 1800. Daniel White died June 16, 1799 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut. His wife, Mehitable Cummins lived until January 19, 1822, and she died in Gorham, Ontario, New York.

I don’t know whether Sarah Snow had contact with her Snow family, but it appears unlikely.  As far as she was concerned, Sarah was a White! Jonathan White and Mehitable Cummins were her parents!  The two names Snow and White have been associated with Sarah for years–a mystery traveling down through the generations. Perhaps the Whites told Sarah in later years, something she may have kept to herself or something she may have shared with her husband. If not, the two names may have arisen from early records now destroyed–some giving her surname as White and others giving her surname as Snow.

Sarah bonded well with the Whites. She was close with her siblings in that family–particularly Mehitable, who was born in 1780. A number of her siblings later moved to Ontario, New York, where Sarah and her husband Daniel settled. Mehitable Cummins White went to New York with her children and died there in 1822. Sarah was also close with other White and Bacon relatives residing in the area. The Whites lived in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut.  Some of their family and friends lived in Dudley, Worcester, Massachusetts, and Sarah accompanied her family to Dudley for visits. It was there where she met her future husband: Daniel Inman (1776-1848), who also made visits to Pomfret.

 

The Story of  Two Josephs

Daniel Inman was born in 1776 in Dudley, Worcester, Massachusetts, and he died in 1848 in Kane County, Illinois. He was the son of Joseph Inman and Lucy Sprague. Joseph was born about 1750 in Dudley, Worcester, Massachusetts, and he died November 16, 1819 in Ontario, Wayne, New York.  His parents Edward Inman (1713-1778) and Dorcas Paine (1709-1789). Lucy’s parents were Deacon John Sprague (1708-1796) and Judith Green (1715-1757).

I need to mention here that Joseph’s records have been mixed up with another Joseph Inman, whose full name was Joseph Steven Inman (1745-1818). Joseph Steven’s parents were Benjamin Inman (1683-1777) and Thamzen Page (1729-1770). Benjamin Inman (1683-1773) was

  • a son of Edward Inman (1654-1735) and Elizabeth Bennett (1655-1721),
  • a brother of my Edward Inman (1680-1755), who was married first to Mary Malavery (1684-1745) and secondly to Lydia Whipple (who died in 1764),
  • an uncle of my Edward Inman (1713-1778), who was married to Dorcas Paine (1709-1789),
  • and a great uncle of my Daniel Inman’s father Joseph Inman (1750-1819).

My Joseph Inman and Lucy Sprague were the parents of my Daniel Inman (1775-1848)

A Chronology of the Life of Benjamin follows:

  • born June 1683, Providence, Rhode Island(28)
  • Received a Summons to Appear–this may have  been related to a broken marriage contract– July 3, 1703(29)
  • Gave notice that he had taken up a stray mare, sorrel in color on 9 Nov 1716–Smithfield, Providence Co., Road Island(30)
  • Benjamin’s Occupation: Blacksmith in 1721–Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island(31)
  • Appraisal of stray mare found by William Mowry–June 6, 1721(32)
  • Made a Freeman in 1733(32)
  • Licensed to sell liquor–10 Sep 1733, Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island. (He operated a tavern)(34).
  • Married Thamzen Page, 16 Oct 1748, Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island(35)
  • Death: 1773-1774, Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island(36)

The early Rhode Island Inmans were Quakers, including Edward Inman (1713-1778) and Elizabeth Bennett (1655-1721). I don’t know how that translates to their children. They were undoubtedly raised as Quakers, but went their own way later. It appears that Benjamin was a Quaker. His son, Joseph Steven, moved to Maine where a large number of early settlers were free-thinkers or scalawags, or both!

Joseph Steven was born September 23, 1745 in Providence, Rhode Island, and he died in 1830 in Orono, Penobscot, Maine. Joseph Steven was falsely arrested and charged with murder–something I discuss below. He was acquitted and after his acquittal, he was given land for the four months he languished in jail. As already noted, Maine’s early settlers were a variety of interesting individualists and scallawags. Joseph Steven’s first wife was Hannah Covell (b. 1755). People have wrongly inserted my Daniel and his sister Lydia into Joseph Steven Inman’s family. They have also listed my Lydia Sprague as the first wife who died early with no children and have given all the children to Hannah Covell! Joseph Steven actually had two marriages. His first to Hannah Covell (b. 1755) resulted in three children: (a) Joseph Inman (1774-1832); (b) Benjamin Inman (1775-1860); and (c) William Inman (1778-1849) as well as a divorce filed by Hannah against Joseph in 1780 for his infidelity.  Joseph then married Ambie Page (1766-1840) in Maine about 1781. (She was the reason for the divorce). Their children were: (a) Allen Inman (b. 1783); (b) Daniel Inman (1784-1822)–not mine; this is another Daniel; (c) Duty Inman (1785-1870); (d) Elias Inman (b. 1787); (e) Henry Inman (1790-1849); (f) Charlotte Caroline Inman (1791-1826); (g) Thomas Inman (b. 1793); (h) Adam Inman (b. 1798). The following is a transcription of the murder trial:

Arrest and Trial of Joseph Inman.

ARREST AND TRIAL OF JOSEPH INMAN OF ORONO,FOR MURDER IN 1801.

Joseph Inman Sen., was an early settler in what is now Orono, where he came 1783, in June. In July 1801, one Oliver Homes, alias Chapman, also a resident was missing. Homes and Inman had quarreled — perhaps when under the influence of rum. With almost entire unanimity the people charged Inman with the murder of Homes. Complaint was made to Col. Jonathan Eddy, of Eddington.

THE COMPLAINT.

To Jonathan Eddy, Esquire, one of the Justices assigned to keep the

Peace within and for said County. Whereas we whose names are under written, have strong suspicions and serious reasons to apprehend that

Oliver Homes, late of Colbornton Plantation, has been murdered; and we have violent reasons to suspect that Joseph Inman, Amble Inman, wife of the said Joseph Inman, and Asenath Homes, wife of the said Oliver Homes, and James Page all of Colbornton Plantation aforesaid, have murdered him the above said Oliver Homes, or been accessory to the above said murder. We therefore request you the said Justice to issue your warrant to apprehend the said Joseph Inman, Amble Inman,

Asenath Homes and James Page, and bring before me the said Justice, for examination, touching the above complaint that they may be further dealt by according to law.

July 22, 1801. Emerson OacuTT,

John Phillips,

Archbald McPhetres.”

Col. Eddy issued his warrant the same day for the arrest of the parties, and Joseph Inman Jr., William Inman, Hannah Page, John Mansell and David Reed were summoned as witnesses. The examination was had the 23d of July at the house of Esquire Eddy, in Eddington — his house was nearly opposite end the Veazie Dam. Nearly the whole population of the upper Penobscot were there; the roads were few, and they came by water. Public opinion was against the prisoners—one or all of them. As to the testimony, tradition says that William Inman swore that he saw his father strike Homes. One piece of testimony has come down. The original I now have before me worn and soiled by 86 years. I give a copy:

Arrest and Trial of Joseph Inman, 55

This day being on Sunday morning about 8 o’clock, William Inman BOD of Joseph Inman of Colbornton Plantation so called, being about 22 or 23 years old, came to me with the following account of what appeared to him the evening before:

**I, William Inman being at a place called Mash’s Island on Penobscot river in a house of Joseph Treat, and John Spencer came in with a pint of rum and told me if I would fetch some water I should have some grog to drink with him. I took a pail in my hand and stepped out of the door and stepped two or three steps towards the water and something appeared before me but I went on to get some water and looking about it seemed to be a Ghost. I dipped some water and turned about to go back. It rose right up before me and seemed to go backward toward the house, and whether it or not I cannot tell for I was very much surprised but it spoke to me and said you may now know what you wanted to know. Your Father was the very man that killed me, and walked away and this I am willing to take my oath of.

William Inman.

But whatever the testimony, it was sufficient to commit Joseph Inman to the Pownalboro Jail, which is now Dresden, to answer to the charge of murder, at the next tern of the Court for the County of Lincoln, where murder cases were returnable. Inman lay in Jail some months; when to the surprise of everyone Homes appeared at Orono. He had been to Rhode Island visiting, and saw in some newspaper, the account of the arrest of Inman, and came back to “show people that he was not dead.”

Inman was soon discharged, and a petition was sent to the General Court in his behalf.

To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in General Court assembled:

The subscribers beg leave to represent that Joseph Inman of a plantation called Colburntown in the county of Hancock, a settler on land of the Commonwealth and who has stated to the scribers that he is indebted to the Commonwealth for said land in the sum of about one hundred and fifty dollars, was in the summer of the year 1801 very unjustly arrested and committed to prison on suspicion of having murdered one Oliver Homes of said Colburntown, who had then been sometime absent from his family, that he, the said Inman, was in close confinement for about four months, and that in commence of said suspicion and confinement he incurred many and very great expenses in endeavoring to discover the said Homes, and many suits were commenced against him by persons to whom he was indebted, his property taken and sold for a very small part of its real value, by reason of which the said Inman is rendered unable to pay the said sum 4ae to said Commonwealth.

Arrest and Trial of Joseph Inman.

The Petition is therefore humble pray that the Court may take into consideration the peculiar inconvenience and injuries the said Inman has sustained in consequence of said arrest and confinement, and release to him the whole or a part of said sum, or otherwise relieve the said Inman as the Court may in their wisdom deem expedient and in duty bound the Petitioners will ever pray.

May 31, 1804.

Boston, Feb. 5, 1805.

Sir: — Joseph Inman, one of the 32 settlers who settled on the Lands purchased by the Commonwealth, of the Penobscot Tribe of Indians before August 1796, has purchased one half of Archibald McPheter’s lot as I am informed, who was returned as one of the said 32 settlers.

The said Archibald McPheters has got a deed of the other half of said lot. There is nothing in the way to hinder the said Inman having 150 acres but his poverty, with me as agent.

Salem Towne.

To Jonathan Maynard, Esq.

Indorsed ^’Gen’l Towns Certificate.”

Resolve: On the petition of Amos Patten directing the Hon. Salem Towne Esq. to make and execute a deed to Joseph Inman of 150 acres of land in the 9 townships of land purchased of the Penobscot Indians.

February 15, 1805.

On the petition of Amos Patten and others, in behalf of Joseph Inman who suffered a long confinement in close goal on suspicion of having murdered one Oliver Homes.

Resolved for reasons set forth in said petition, that the prayer thereof be granted, and that the Hon. Salem Towne Esq., as commissioner or agent for the sale of the nine townships of land purchased of the Penobscot Indians, be directed and is hereby authorized, and empowered to make and execute a good and sufficient deed to the aforesaid Joseph Inman, of 150 acres of land, free of any expense to him the said Inman, in the same way and manner as though he, the said Inman had complied with a Resolve of the Legislature passed March 21, A. D. 1798, he being one of the settlers therein described any law or resolve to the contrary notwithstanding(37).

At first, I thought What a horrible experience for the poor man to suffer! I wondered about the subsequent relationship between Joseph Stephens Inman and his son, William, who testified against him. It didn’t take long to find the answer:

Hannah Inman Divorce Petition 1780 Transcribed

And general —- delivery begun and held at Providence on the first Monday of Sep AD 1780

Hannah Inman of Smithfield in the County of Providence, wife of Joseph Inman Junior late of said Smithfield, humbly herewith that many years since she was lawfully married to the said Joseph; that often times in the house of the last Winter, the said Joseph was seen in bed with a woman other than your petitioner. By which wicked and dissolute behavior he hath broken his marriage covenant with the said Hannah–All which she is now ready and fully able to prove to your Honour. Wherefore she prays your Honour to take the ——– into your wise consideration and that upon due proof of the above mentioned facts, your Honour will pronounce well your Sentence of Divorce, declaring the bonds of marriage between the said Joseph and Hannah broken and the said marriage is wholly dissolved and as in duty bound she will ever pray.

Hannah Inman

Transcribed by Tina Grimes November 9, 2014(38).

Joseph Steven probably received his “just dessert” languishing in that jail for four months. Son William–who testified against him–was a son of Joseph Steven’s jilted wife, who was William’s mother! Father and son were probably at odds for some time over the stepmother!

Joseph Stevens Inman was not my Joseph Inman, but they were cousins!

 

The Daniel Inman Family

Joseph Inman and Lucy Sprague were married August 17, 1775 in Dudley, Worcester, Massachusetts(39). Their children follow:

  1. Daniel Inman (1776-1848). The subject under discussion here.
  2. Lydia Inman (1778-1826). Lydia was born in 1778 in Dudley, Worcester, Massachusetts, and she died May 23, 1826 in Ontario. New York. Her husband was James Leavens (1775-1827). Their children were: (a) Harriet Leavens (1806-1831); (b) Leona Leavens (1807-1812); (c) Lucy Leavens (1809-1895; (d) Henry Leavens (1811-1883); (e) Lewis Leavens (b. 1812); (f) George Leavens (b. 1814); (g) James Leavens (1814-1856). Lydia and James are buried in the Furnaceville Cemetery, Ontario, Wayne County, New York.

Joseph Inman appears as a private in Capt. Nathaniel Healy’s Company, Col. Jonathan Holman’s regiment for a service of forty-three days. The company marched to Rhode Island on an alarm in December 1776 and was stationed in Providence January 21, 1777(40). Joseph Inman also appears on a list of men appearing in Capt. J. Sprague’s division in service in October 1777(41).  These were Massachusetts units, and these records are sometimes applied to Joseph Steven Inman. Joseph Steven Inman resided in Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island during the Revolutionary War. He appears on two documents: The Rhode Island 1777 Military List(42) and The Rhode Island 1777 Military Census Index(43).

Joseph Inman remained in Dudley, Worcester, Massachusetts until 1800. He and his family relocated to Connecticut, where they appear on the 1800 Census for Brooklyn, Windham, Connecticut(44), and the 1810 Census for Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut(45). His son Daniel–my third great-grandfather–married Sarah Snow–my third great-grandmother in 1800 in Dudley, Worcester, Massachusetts. The young couple accompanied Daniel’s parents to Connecticut, where their oldest child was born in 1801. According to Charles Inman:

In 1807 or 1809 Daniel moved from Connecticut to Ontario (now Wayne) County, New York, and became one of the original settlers of the present-day village of Ontario, which was then known as Inman’s Corners or Inman Cross Roads. He purchased 400 acres at that location and built a log House and a sawmill there. In 1810 he had the first tavern stand in the town erected. Daniel was on the muster roll of the militia during the war of 1812, appearing as a sergeant on the rolls of Captain Ebenezer Ingoldsby’s Company of the Thirty-ninth Infantry in the early part of 1813. He was appointed Lieutenant int he Seventy-first Regiment of Militia, 24 April 1818. Daniel was the first tax collector of Ontario. He was also the first postmaster, being appointed to that position for “Inman Cross Roads” on 25 April 1818 and serving until 5 January 1824. A prominent and influential man, he was given to deeds of kindness and charity(46).

The children of Daniel Inman and Sarah Snow follow:

  1. Willard Inman (1801-aft 1860). Willard was born in 1801 in Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut, and he died after 1860 in Jefferson, Butler, Iowa. For years, people thought he died in Kane County, Illinois. I found him on the 1860 Census in Butler County(47), but he disappears from the records after that. His wife’s name was Lydia M. Peck. Their children were: (a) Sarah Inman, born 1825; (b) Elsie Inman, born 1833; (c) Daniel Willard Inman (1835-1909); (d) Chester William Inman (1837-1894); (e) Joseph George Inman (1838-1893); (f) Harriet S. Inman (b. 1840); (g) Lucy Caroline Inman (b. 1843); (h) Franklin E. Inman (1844-1864); (I) Cassius F. Inman (1846-1863). Willard and Lydia married at Inman Corners, Ontario, Wayne County, New York in 1834.
  2. David Trumbull Inman (1802-1866). David was born in Ontario, Wayne County, New York in 1802, and he died April 15, 1866 in Illinois. His wife’s first name was Alamanda. I know nothing else about him.
  3. Alcy Inman (1807-1873). Alcy was born May 21, 1807 in Ontario, Wayne, New York, and she died April 13, 1873 in Marble Rock, Floyd County, Iowa. Her husband was Robert D. Frost (1808-1873). Their children were: (a) Joseph Inman Robert Frost (1831-1907); (b) Sarah Frost (b. 1839); (c) Josephine Frost (1843-1920); (d) Robert David Frost (1846-1921). (I think I have a picture of Alcy. I need to look through my collection.)
  4. Joseph Inman (1809-1880). Joseph was born in 1809 in New York, and he died of consumption in March 1880, Marble Rock, Floyd, Iowa. His wife was Caroline. I have no additional information about him.
  5. Loren Inman (1810-1878). Loren and his wife Lucy Carpenter (1812-1890) were my second great-grandparents. I will be writing an article on them later, but I will list their children here. Loren was born in 1810 in Ontario, Wayne, New York, and he died September 12, 1878 in Marble Rock, Floyd, Iowa. Their children were: (a) Harvey Carpenter Inman (1836-1883); (b) Joseph L. Inman (1841-1863); (c) Alonzo Inman (1841-1912)–my great grandfather; (d) Charlotte Marinda Inman (1849-1892); (e) Dora Ellen Inman (1852-1930); (f) 2 infant Inmans..
  6. Nelson Proctor Inman (1822-1872). Nelson was born in March 1822 in Genesee County, New York, and he died in 1872 in Sheffield, Franklin, Iowa. His wife was Laura Jane Denny (1826-1916). A short biography follows:

Nelson Inman was in DeKalb Co., IL in 1855 and in Kane Co., IL in 1856. He moved to IA about 1858. In 1860 Nelson and his brothers Loren and Joseph were apparently living on adjacent farms in Union Twsp., Floyd Co., IA since their dwellings were enumerated in succession in the census schedule for that year. Nelson was present at the first school meeting in Scott Tp., Floyd Co., IA which was held no later than April 1864, and he appears on the earliest extant assessor’s list (1866) for that township. The 1870 Census, however, again gives Nelson’s residence as Union Tp., which is adjacent to Scott Tp. Nelson was a farmer. He died about 1872, probably at Sheffield, IA, and is said to have expired from exposure during an attempt to get a doctor for either his son or a neighbor’s family.
Nelson’s wife, Laura, had eight years of schooling. Family tradition tells of a time during an Indian scare when Laura and her children were living southeast of Sheffield. She called in her sons, buried her new cook stove with her dishes and silver inside, and moved in with Jacob Zimmerman (father of Mary Zimmerman, Laura’s daughter-in-law, 1 1/2 miles away. Laura was said to have been almost fearless. Once when returning home alone through the woods at night after helping butcher, the timber wolves approached her so closely that she was forced to throw the meat she was carrying to them in order to reach home safely.
In 1879 Nelson’s wife, Laura, purchased 40 acres adjoining the 40 acres she already owned in West Fork Twsp., about a mile SE of Sheffield. She sold one of the 40 acre parcels in 1883 to D. A. Inman, presumably her son, Daniel Alonzo Inman. Laura was still in the Sheffield area in 1900 but later homesteaded in the Dakotas where she, her daughter Nancy, and a grandson, Fred Underkoffler, built cabins together at the juncture of three quater sections. They lost essentially all their possessions in a prairie fire about 1910. Laura and Nancy moved from Emmetsburg, IA to Warroad, MN in 1915. Both died in a house fire at Warroad May 7, 1916(48).

The children of Nelson Proctor and Laura Inman were: (a) Nancy J. Inman (1852-1916); (b) John Nelson Inman (1854-1942); (c) William Henry Harrison Inman (1856-1950); (d) Daniel Alonzo Inman (1860-1915); (e) Ida Irene Inman (1862-1864); Lucy Adell Inman (1864-1967).

The father of Daniel Inman, Joseph Inman, died while chopping wood November 16, 1819 in Ontario, Wayne, New York. According to his obituary, he was chopping down a tree and asked the man who was with him which way the tree would fall. Then he fell against the tree and died(49). The Inmans continued to reside in New York. Daniels sister Lydia died May 23, 1826 in Ontario, New York and her husband James Leavens died November 12, 1827 in Ontario. Daniel began planning a move to Illinois. His mother, Lucy Sprague Inman, was getting on in years and did not plan to move there. Lucy’s date of death is unknown, but I believe I may have found her. She came from Connecticut; I believe she returned there. When Daniel’s family moved to Illinois in 1830, Lucy moved to New London, Connecticut, where she was known as Lucy Sprague. A number of Sprague families resided in the area; she probably lived with one of them. This Lucy Sprague died May 20, 1836 in New London, Connecticut. She is buried in the Cedar Grove Cemetery in New London(50). At this time, I do not know whether this is my Lucy, but she is a possibility . Lucy may have died long before 1836 in New York.

The Daniel Inman family is on the census for Ontario, Wayne County, New York in 1830(51). Sarah was still living at the time. It is possible that Sarah died in New York and not in Illinois. According to Charles Inman:

Sometime in the period 1836-40 Daniel moved with his son, Joseph, to Kane County, Ill. and probably settled at once in Sugar Grove Twp. When Daniel, who farmed in Sugar Grove, moved onto his quarter section…on 21 May 1842, his house there was an “approximately 12-foot square frame dwelling with floor, door, window, stove and board roof”. In addition to several small conveyances out of his Holdings in the southeast quarter of section 11 to other settlers in 1842 and 1843, he deeded 52.45 acres of this quarter section to his son, Joseph, 3 Aug 1848. Daniel died in Kane County in 1848(52).

Willard, David, Joseph and Loren  all appear on the 1840 Census for Sugar Grove Twp., Kane County, Illinois.

So where does our friend, Dr. Swett, fit into all of this?

 

An Interesting Connection

I’ve already told the story about how Howard and I met Dr. Rex Swett at the Cancer Center last spring. He was a patient like Howard and not a doctor. Actually, he spent his career as a dentist. I supplied a link to that earlier article I wrote, so I won’t repeat all of that here.

We were sitting at the Center, talking one day about genealogy, a topic that really fascinated Rex. He wanted to know something about his ancestors because he could only go back to his grandparents. So he gave me the names of people he knew about, and I told him I would see what I could find. And I went to work on the project that evening.

“Want to know something funny?” I told Howard, as I searched through the names. “I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if Rex doesn’t end up somewhere on my family tree!”

“What makes you say that?”

“Well, his ancestors were all living in the same places as mine and at the same time! They at least had to know one another.”

I was able to go back quite a distance on his Swett/Sweete line. So I made up a chart and gave it to him the next time I saw him.

He was thrilled! He had no idea about any of that.

“And you have a lot of doctors in your background!” I added.

He knew about his grandfather, but not the others.

I last saw Rex on June 9, 2015 when we met with him and his wife at our favorite diner (Great Scott’s Eatery)–their treat because I found all of that family history for him. I think Howard saw him the following month, and he told me he knew then the end was near. Rex passed away August 2. He donated his body to science. After his death, I returned to some of the projects I was working on. I was finishing up my Spence line and about to turn to Inman. And I hadn’t looked at that line in years.

Rex’s ancestral chart was still on my computer in my ancestral tree. It was “floating in space’–not connected to anything. For a moment, I thought about deleting it. Then I decided not to do that, and I am so glad I made that decision.

Shortly after that, I began working on the Snow line, having finally made the decision to follow that course. Sarah Snow’s mother was Hannah Chubb/Cobb. I frowned, wondering where I heard that name before.

“Did Rex mention the Chubb name when he talked about his family?” I asked Howard.

“I don’t know. Why?”

“I think he did.”

Focusing my attention on the name, I followed it out a while until I made a discovery.

“You won’t believe this!” I announced. “I have a cousin match here–although it is definitely distant.”

Hannah Cobb (1712-1791), daughter of Samuel Cobb (1682-1767) and Abigail Stuart (1686-1766), and granddaughter of Deacon Jonathan Cobb (1660-1728) and Hope Chipman (1652-1728)–my first cousin seven times removed–became the second wife of John Swett (1703-1746), son of John Swett (1703-1746). John was the son of Stephen Swett, Sr. (1673-1746) and Mary Kent (1674-1714), and the grandson of  Capt. Benjamin Sweet (1624-1677) and Esther Weare (1627-1718)–Rex’s first cousin seven times removed!

A few days later when I was working on the Snow line, I discovered that Rex and I were first cousins eleven times removed and that his John Swett who married my Hannah Cobb was my fourth cousin eight times removed. My ninth great-grandfather, Patrick Snow (1571-1638) married my ninth great-grandmother, Marie Sweete (1583-1640). She was the daughter of Matthew Sweete (1545-1612) and Dorothy Delbridge (1562-1589)–my tenth great-grandparents! Matthew was Dorothy’s second husband. Her first husband was Rex’s direct ancestor and Matthew’s brother, Richard Swett (1546-1581). Rex descends directly from their son, John Swett (b. 1680).

Rex’s ancestors lived in Barnstable, Massachusetts during the same period of time that mine lived there and were also in Rockingham County, New Hampshire where my Bachiller-Wing ancestors lived. Eventually they went to Maine and stayed there until Moses Swett (b. 1740) departed for Canada. (Like his ancestors, Rex was definitely a free-thinker and a free-spirit!) They remained in Canada until John Swett (b. 1776) returned to New York for a short period of time. Rex’s grandfather, Dr. Charles Swett (b. 1879) was born in Illinois and Rex’s father, Charles H. Swett, Jr. (1906-1960), was born in Winner, Tripp, South Dakota and died in Rapid City, Pennington, South Dakota. Rex grew up in South Dakota, where he became an outstanding athlete. (That story is in the other article.)

First cousins eleven times removed!

Somewhere, I think Rex is smiling!

 

References

 

(1) Charles G. Inman, Daniel Inman of Connecticut, Ontario, N.Y., and Sugar Grove, Ill. and His Descendants ca. 1776- ca. 1976 with Ancestral Notes to the Early Seventeeth Century, 1976.  Available on The Inman Compendium Website: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=inman_compendium

(2) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Jonathan Snow and Hannah Chubb. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 2 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Jonathan Snow, Jr. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Eunice Snow. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Annis Snow. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(6) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Willard Snow. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Willard Snow. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(8) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Dudley Snow. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(9) U.S., War of 1812 Service Records, 1812-1815. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah about Dudley Snow. Date Accessed: 2 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) Charles G. Inman, Daniel Inman of Connecticut, Ontario, N.Y., and Sugar Grove, Ill. and His Descendants ca. 1776- ca. 1976 with Ancestral Notes to the Early Seventeeth Century, 1976.  Available on The Inman Compendium Website: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=inman_compendium

(11) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Jonathan White . Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Jonathan White and Mehitable Cummins. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Jonathan White, Jr. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Danforth White, Jr. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Anna White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Elizabeth White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(17) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Daniel White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(18) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Sarah Polly White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(19) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Sarah Polly White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(20) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Mehitable White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(21) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Dorcus White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(22) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Walter White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(23) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Resolved White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(24) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Artemesia White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(25) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Sarah Polly White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(26) Early Connecticut, Town and Marriage Records (The Barbour Collection) for Mehitable White. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(27) U.S. Find-a-Grave Index for Amos Underwood. Ancestry.com, Probo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(28) Benjamin Inman Birth Information. Records of the Colony of Rhode Island in the New World. Date Accessed: 4 Nov 2015. Available online at http://books.google.com/books?id=x3BVQTtkd_8C&pg=PA175&dq=%22Benjamin+Inman%22&lr=&cd=24#v=onepage&q=%22Benjamin%20Inman%22&f=false

(29)  Benjamin Inman Notice to Appear, 3 Jul 1703. [Apparently related to a broken contract of marriage]. Records of the Colony of Rhode Island in the New World. Date Accessed: 4 Nov 2015. Available online at http://books.google.com/books?id=x3BVQTtkd_8C&pg=PA175&dq=%22Benjamin+Inman%22&lr=&cd=24#v=onepage&q=%22Benjamin%20Inman%22&f=false

(30) Benjamin Inman Notice Regarding Stray Horse, 9 Nov. 1716. Early Records of Providence, IX:162

(31) Benjamin Inman’s Occupation in 1721: Blacksmith. Early Records of Rhode Island

(32) Benjamin Inman Appraisal, 6 Jun 1721. Early Records of Providence, IX:153

(33) Benjamin Inman Made a Freeman, 1733. Early Records of Rhode Island

(34) Benjamin Inman Liquor License, 10 Sep 1733. Rhode Island Historical Society: Abstracts made 1882 (dated 28 Dec. 1882) by Erastus Richardson, from Smithfield Town Council Records, 1731-1748)

(35) Benjamin Inman Marriage, 16 Oct 1748. The Narragansett historical register, Volume 7 By Rhode Island Citizens Historical Association, pg 41; Vital Record of Rhode Island Vol 1 & 2 by James N Arnold

(36) Benjamin Inman, Death, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at: http://www.ancestry.com

(37) Joseph Inman Murder Article, Published in the Providence Journal 9 Sep 1801. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(38) Hannah Inman Divorce Petition 1780 Transcribed by Tina Grimes 9 Nov 2014. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(39) Massachusetts Marriages, 1633-1850 about Joseph Inman and Lucy Sprague. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(40) Joseph Inman Revolutionary War Service. Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolutionary War (Images Online). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(41) Joseph Inman Revolutionary War Service. Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the Revolutionary War (Images Online). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(42) Joseph Steven Inman Revolutionary War Service. The Rhode Island 1777 Military List. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(43) Joseph Steven Inman Revolutionary War Service. The Rhode Island 1777 Military Census. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(44) 1800 Census for Brooklyn, Windham, Connecticut about Joseph Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov. 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(45) 1810 Census for Pomfret, Windham, Connecticut about Joseph Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov. 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(46) Charles G. Inman, Daniel Inman of Connecticut, Ontario, N.Y., and Sugar Grove, Ill. and His Descendants ca. 1776- ca. 1976 with Ancestral Notes to the Early Seventeeth Century, 1976.  Available on The Inman Compendium Website: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=inman_compendium

(47) 1860 Census for Butler, Jefferson, Iowa for Willard Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(48) Nelson Proctor Inman Biography from the Inman Compendium. Submitted to Ancestry.com by Brenda Ozog 10 Apr 2009. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(49) Joseph Inman Obituary, Published in the Providence Gazette December 4, 1819. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(50) Lucy Sprague Find-a-Grave Index. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(51) 1830 Census for Ontario, Wayne, New York for Daniel, Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 5 Nov 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(52) Charles G. Inman, Daniel Inman of Connecticut, Ontario, N.Y., and Sugar Grove, Ill. and His Descendants ca. 1776- ca. 1976 with Ancestral Notes to the Early Seventeeth Century, 1976.  Available on The Inman Compendium Website: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?db=inman_compendium

 

 

 

Stirring the Nest in the Northeastern Inman Families

Parade of baby ducks!

Parade of baby ducks!

 

Whenever I start working on a different family line, I generally take time updating my information about them prior to writing the series. I’m currently doing that with Dad’s Northeastern Inmans since I haven’t looked at some of those lines in years! And I have discovered some interesting things. My discoveries all relate to Dad’s Inman line and focus on three families who intermarried with them.

One big problem centered around the wife of Edward Inman (1713-1778) whose wife’s first name (Dorcas) was known, but not her last name. When I first started looking at this line a few years ago, I discovered that a number of people thought her last name was Paine. I checked into it and soon discovered that the Dorcas Paine they focused on married someone else and that was her only marriage. So I listed Dorcus on my tree as Dorcus “Paine”–a marker indicating I would look into it later. Paine was definitely a pain, but I was working on other lines at the time, and I had no ancestral clue for this mysterious lady.  About a month ago, I started looking into Docus “Paine” again only this time, I found her real identity.  Thank goodness for all the records Ancestry has added to their database over the years because when I re-investigated the Paines recently, I blazed a trail!

I always hesitate doing this. The question Am I heading in the right direction lingers in my mind, followed by What if all of this is wrong, and I have to start all over again?  That’s when Ancestry’s DNA steps in.

About a year ago, I took advantage of one of Ancestry’s offers: for $79 I could get one of their DNA kits.

Well, why not? I decided.

Then I waited “patiently” for the kit to arrive. And I wasted no time in returning my result after receiving the kit. Matches were almost immediate. Very early, I was in a number of DNA Circles of people whose DNA matched mine and whose ancestors matched mine, and the list has grown to 23 DNA Circles on both sides of the family plus 283 individual matches:

  • Loren Inman Family DNA Circle
  • Lucy Carpenter Family DNA Circle
  • Daniel Inman Family DNA Circle
  • Samuel Perry Spence Family DNA Circle
  • Rebecca Elizabeth Inman Family DNA Circle
  • Joel Owensby Hood Family DNA Circle
  • Nancy Haskins Family DNA Circle
  • John Christian Clay Family DNA Circle
  • Mary Barbara Hoy Family DNA Circle
  • George Albert Hoy Family DNA Circle
  • Mary Yeager Family DNA Circle
  • Christina Dellinger Family DNA Circle
  • John George Coffman (Kauffman) Family DNA Circle
  • Charles Barney Family DNA Circle
  • Benjamin Franklin Barney Family DNA Circle
  • Darius Brown Family DNA Circle–this family provided the key to the Paine matter; he is my fourth cousin four times removed
  • Leah Johnson Family DNA Circle–she was the wife of Darius Brown
  • Barbara Stiffler Family DNA Circle
  • James Alfred Estill Family DNA Circle
  • Christian Snyder Family DNA Circle
  • John Johnson Carpenter Family DNA Circle
  • Susan Ann Sudduth Family DNA Circle
  • Elias Sudduth Family DNA Circle

Darius Brown provided my link to the correct Paine line and also introduced me to the Brown line that had intermarried with the Paines. As soon as I incorporated all of that information into my tree, I started receiving confirmations of matching DNA  on both Paine and Brown lines. So the issue is settled as far as I am concerned. (I will be talking about those lines in a later article.)

The Cline/Clyne line was the second one I tackled. It bothered me because I had little information about them, and yet they figured prominently in Dad’s Inman history. The line ended in New York. I poked around that state years ago and gave up when I could find nothing new.  And I was about to give up on them again recently until I discovered a death record for my third great-grandmother and discovered her maiden name: Chelson or Chilson. That discovery finally broke down the barrier. I started receiving DNA matches on the Chelson/Chilson line almost as soon as I entered the data on my tree. I’m still poking around somewhat with the Cline line, but Rome wasn’t built in a day. At least I am heading in the right direction.

The third problem on Dad’s Inman line centers upon the wife of Daniel Inman (1776-1848). There was one wife and only one wife whose first name was Sarah. (Over the years, some people have credited Daniel with three wives–all named Sarah. That didn’t happen! There was only one Sarah!)  Existing records suggest that she was either a Snow or a White. Years ago, I couldn’t find anything to justify either name, so I listed her as Sarah Snow for a while and then as Sarah Snow/White. In recent years, I played around with the White name, but I could find no resolution there either. Then I discovered people had added a third wife named Sarah Proctor/Procter, and I knew I had to reach a conclusion soon. (Daniel and Sarah’s youngest son was Nelson Proctor Inman (1822-1872).  Some of his descendants have decided that Sarah’s name was Proctor. I could find no record or other confirmation of that).

Back at the drawing board once again, I tore through existing records and finally concluded that my original assumption was correct: Sarah’s surname was Snow!  I will write about this experience in a later article. What I will note here is that when I incorporated the Snow name into my tree and after including the people I thought were her family, I began receiving DNA confirmations in that regard. So I’m satisfied I’m on the right path.

Meanwhile, I’m still stirring–

Update!!! (November 1, 2015)

I have an update to add to this article concerning the Snow line. My research has been confirmed concerning Sarah Snow and her parents. I received several DNA confirmations today. Will be writing an article on it in the future.

We Meet Again: William Miller (1782-1849)

William Miller (

William Miller (1782-1840)

 

I mentioned this man in my first book The Sum Total: William Miller (1782-1849)–the founder of the Millerite Movement or Millerism in the 1840s. It was during the time of the Great Awakening, and a number of revivals were underway at the time. Miller was a big item in Ohio in the 1840s when my Clay/Klee ancestors lived there. So I mentioned him briefly in my book along with other events taking place at the time, and then I went on from there. I forgot all about him until today.

I was working on Dad’s Cline/Clyne line–a line that has been very difficult to trace. My great-grandfather, Alonzo Inman (1842-1912), married Caroline Elizabeth Waiste (1842-1933). Caroline was the daughter of Uri Smith Waiste (1814-1873) and Polly Cline (1813-1886). And Polly Cline was the daughter of Jacob Cline/Clyne (1771-1853) and Polly Chelson/Chilson (1777-1865)–the Cline line I am currently researching.

My third great-grandparents, Jacob Cline/Clyne and Polly Chelson/Chilson, are buried in the William Miller Farm/Cemetery in Low Hampton, Washington County, New York! William Miller is buried there as well.

Okay–so who was William Miller? I wondered as I stared at the cemetery page. After all, five years had passed since I wrote that book. His Find-a-Grave Memorial jogged my memory, and when I discovered his photo on the internet, I knew I had visited him before. Only now, he had a direct connection with some of my ancestors!

Who Was William Miller?

After bumping into William Miller again–this time so closely associated with family members– I had to order a book about him. It has been shipped, but I may not receive it until sometime in late November or early December. For now, I will rely on a brief synopsis of from the Wikipedia site and expand it more fully after the book arrives:

William Miller was born on February 15, 1782, in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. His parents were Captain William Miller, a veteran of the American Revolution, and Paulina, the daughter of Elnathan Phelps. When he was four years old, his family moved to rural Low Hampton, New York. Miller was educated at home by his mother until the age of nine, when he attended the newly established East Poultney District School. Miller is not known to have undertaken any type of formal study after the age of eighteen, though he continued to read widely and voraciously.  As a youth, he had access to the private libraries of Judge James Witherell and Congressman Matthew Lyon in nearby Fair Haven, Vermont, as well as that of Alexander Cruikshanks of Whitehall, New York. In 1803, Miller married Lucy Smith and moved to her nearby hometown of Poultney, where he took up farming. While in Poultney, Miller was elected to a number of civil offices, starting with the office of Constable. In 1809 he was elected to the office of Deputy Sheriff and at an unknown date was elected Justice of the Peace. Miller served in the Vermont militia and was commissioned a lieutenant on July 21, 1810. He was reasonably well off, owning a house, land, and at least two horses.

Shortly after his move to Poultney, Miller rejected his Baptist heritage and became a Deist. In his biography Miller records his conversion: “I became acquainted with the principal men in that village [Poultney, Vermont], who were professedly Deists; but they were good citizens, and of a moral and serious deportment. They put into my hands the works of Voltaire, [David] Hume, Thomas Paine, Ethan Allen, and other deistical writers”(1)

To make a long story short, after Miller became a Deist, he joined the military and after he was discharged from his military service, he returned to Low Hampton, Washington County, New York. He bought a farm there, and the William Miller Cemetery where he and my ancestors are buried is located in the area. When he returned to Low Hampton, he attempted regaining his Baptist faith. But his early attempt failed when he tried  to regain his Baptist faith by remaining a Deist.

That didn’t work out too well.

In Miller’s words:

“Suddenly the character of a Savior was vividly impressed upon my mind. It seemed that there might be a Being so good and compassionate as to Himself atone for our transgressions, and thereby save us from suffering the penalty of sin. I immediately felt how lovely such a Being must be; and imagined that I could cast myself into the arms of, and trust in the mercy of, such a One”(2).

After  his conversion, his father (who was a Deist) challenged him to prove it. So Miller compiled a calculation of the exact date when Christ would return–the Second Coming. Some writers indicate that Miller did not actually release the date to the public himself. The announcement was made by a Congregational minister in Boston. The result was a religious fervor that got out of control, ending in The Great Disappointment:

After the failure of Miller’s expectations for October 22, 1844, the date became known as the Millerites’ Great Disappointment. Hiram Edson recorded that “Our fondest hopes and expectations were blasted, and such a spirit of weeping came over us as I never experienced before… We wept, and wept, till the day dawn.” Following the Great Disappointment most Millerites simply gave up their beliefs. Some did not and viewpoints and explanations proliferated. Miller initially seems to have thought that Christ’s Second Coming was still going to take place—that “the year of expectation was according to prophecy; but…that there might be an error in Bible chronology, which was of human origin, that could throw the date off somewhat and account for the discrepancy.” Miller never gave up his belief in the Second Coming of Christ; he died on December 20, 1849, still convinced that the Second Coming was imminent. Miller is buried near his home in Low Hampton, NY and his home is a registered National Historic Landmark and preserved as a museum: William Miller’s Home(3).

Repercussions followed The Great Disappointment:

The Millerites had to deal with their own shattered expectations, as well as considerable criticism and even violence from the public. Many followers had given up their possessions in expectation of Christ’s return. On November 18, 1844, Miller wrote to Himes about his experiences:

“Some are tauntingly enquiring, ‘Have you not gone up?’ Even little children in the streets are shouting continually to passersby, ‘Have you a ticket to go up?’ The public prints, of the most fashionable and popular kind…are caricaturing in the most shameful manner of the ‘white robes of the saints,’ Revelation 6:11, the ‘going up,’ and the great day of ‘burning.’ Even the pulpits are desecrated by the repetition of scandalous and false reports concerning the ‘ascension robes’, and priests are using their powers and pens to fill the catalogue of scoffing in the most scandalous periodicals of the day.”

There were also the instances of violence: a Millerite church was burned in Ithaca, and two were vandalized in Dansville and Scottsville. In Loraine, Illinois, a mob attacked the Millerite congregation with clubs and knives, while a group in Toronto was tarred and feathered. Shots were fired at another Canadian group meeting in a private house.

Both Millerite leaders and followers were left generally bewildered and disillusioned. Responses varied: some continued to look daily for Christ’s return, while others predicted different dates—among them April, July, and October 1845. Some theorized that the world had entered the seventh millennium—the “Great Sabbath”, and that therefore, the saved should not work. Others acted as children, basing their belief on Jesus’ words in Mark 10:15: “Truly, I say to you, whoever does not receive the kingdom of God like a child shall not enter it.” Millerite O. J. D. Pickands used Revelation to teach that Christ was now sitting on a white cloud and must be prayed down. Probably the majority, however, simply gave up their beliefs and attempted to rebuild their lives. Some members rejoined their previous denominations. A substantial number joined the Shakers(4).

A number of denominations emerged from this event including the Shakers, the Seventh-Day Adventists, and the Jehovah’s Witnesses. My third great grandparents were Millerite Baptists, and they remained loyal with the original group.

I just hope they weren’t sitting on top of their roof, dressed in white sheets!

 

References

(1) William Miller, Preacher. From the Wikipedia site. Last modified: 15 Sep 2015. Date Accessed: 25 Oct 2015. Available online at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Miller_%28preacher%29

(2) William Miller, Preacher. From the Wikipedia site. Last modified: 15 Sep 2015. Date Accessed: 25 Oct 2015. Available online at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Miller_%28preacher%29

(3) William Miller, Preacher. From the Wikipedia site. Last modified: 15 Sep 2015. Date Accessed: 25 Oct 2015. Available online at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Miller_%28preacher%29

(4) Great Disappointment. From the Wikipedia site. Last modified: 27 Jul 2015. Date Accessed: 25 Oct 2015. Available online at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Disappointment

 

 

 

From Spence to Inman: A Transition in Process

Sunrise October 21

Colorado sunrise October 19, 2015

 

Monday, October 19, 2015 marked a transition point in my research. I finished the major portion of my Spence research–something I started September 6, 2014! It took a little over a year to complete it. That doesn’t mean I will never write about the Spences again. From time to time I will do an article about them. But the major block of my Spence research is finished. Monday morning, I gathered up all the Spence research notebooks stacked beside my living room chair and carted them downstairs to my research bookcase. At least they are all together in one place so I can easily find them again.

It took me a while to decide what to do next. I have a number of family lines waiting on the sidelines, so I had to really think about the line to pursue next. The Spence family comprised my mother’s main family line. It seemed only fair to look at my father’s main Inman line, only I decided to arrange it differently this time. Instead of starting with the earliest Inman in the line, about whom I am still debating, I plan to start it with the present and move back into the past.  While pondering my decision, I received a notice from Ancestry.com regarding a possible ancestor match. From time to time, I receive notices about possible ancestor matches from Ancestry based upon DNA comparisons and in the past, those suggestions proved fruitful.  This one left me puzzled.

The man’s name was Darius Brown. According to the Ancestry descriptor:

Darius Brown was born on November 27, 1808. He married his first wife on April 6, 1834. On August 17, 1862, he married his second wife. He died on June 3, 1871, at the age of 62(1).

My reaction?  Who? Never heard of him! Yet four people who descended from Darius Brown and his wife, Leah Johnson, had my DNA!

I have a few Browns in my tree and checked those first. I could not find a connection. However, given the fact that Ancestry discovered a possible link as well as the fact that four people had the same DNA as mine linking us to this person–there had to be a connection somewhere. So I began looking into Darius Brown’s family history.

His parents were George P. Brown (1768-1843) and Sarah Kidder (1780-1875), and his wives were Leah Johnson (1814-1859) and Susannah Potter (1817-1867). Darius was born in Yates, New York. He married Leah Johnson in Benton, Yates, New York and by 1860, they resided in Homer, Calhoun, Michigan, where he died in 1871. Darius had nineteen children. Yet after reading all of this, I still could not find a connection. Some of my ancestors settled in Michigan; not many.  However, New York provided some possibilities. So I began following the Brown ancestors on Darius Brown’s line via his pedigree chart. When I arrived in Providence, Rhode Island, I thought Hey! Dad’s Inman ancestors started there!  That’s when I really became serious about the whole thing. And that’s when I found the connection: a common ancestor by the name of Jeremiah Brown!

I won’t discuss Jeremiah here until I arrive at his section. That is a long way out on the tree, so it will be some time before I complete the story about him. And by waiting until the right time, I avoid having to return here to update something. I tell this portion of the  story now as an introduction because it helped me focus on my Dad’s Inman line for my next research project.

As for Darius Brown–there was a connection. He turned out to be my fourth cousin four times removed. He and his wife Leah resulted in another Ancestry DNA Circle.

 

References

(1) Ancestry DNA Evidence about Darius Brown. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Oct. 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com