Who Killed John Bass Jones?–Part 2: The Odyssey of Mrs. Ady

 

Myra Maybelle Shirley--a/k/a Belle Starr--the way she looked when she lived in Carthage, Missouri. From my photo collection. Original source unknown.

Myra Maybelle Shirley–a/k/a Belle Starr–the way she looked when she lived in Carthage, Missouri. From my photo collection. Original source unknown.

Of the cast of characters emerging from the 1880 John Bass Jones grand jury murder investigation in Jasper Co., Missouri, one person stands out as an interesting question mark, inviting further examination. As I read through the Carthage Banner story appearing in Part 1 of this article, I wondered about Mrs. Ady and the extent of her involvement in the matter. Judging from the newspaper article, Mrs. Ady changed her testimony considerably between the time of the coroner’s inquest in 1867 and the grand jury investigation in 1880. Not only did her testimony change drastically, but her name appears in several households in the area throughout the period. After piecing the sections of her testimony together and comparing her testimony with available marriage, census, tax and death records, I finally came up with an answer to the question Who was Mrs. Ady?

Elizabeth A. Foster was born in November 1840 to Jarrett Foster (1795/1800-aft. 1875) and Dorcas Moseley (1803-aft. Aug. 8, 1865) in Bradley Co., Tennessee. She was born with a pedigree chart extending back to the Kings and Queens of England, with elements of Scarlet O’Hara (Gone With the Wind), Ashton Maine Huntoon (The North and the South), and Kate Trask (East of Eden) in her character. Her parents were born in South Carolina and lived in Union County. The family also had ties extending back to Goochland Co., Virginia, inhabited by the Spencer, Toney and Jones families, whose descendants later settled in Jasper Co., Missouri.

According to the Cunningham/Webster Family Tree on Ancestry.com, Jarrett and Dorcas Foster had the following children:

John Foster, (b. 1823, South Carolina; m. Jane [Surname Unknown] Feb. 9, 1860, Jasper Co., Missouri; d. aft. 1870, Jasper Co., Missouri.) A boy with an unknown name (b. 1825, South Carolina). Lucinda Foster (b. 1828, Tennessee). [No additional information.] Sarah Foster (b. 1830, Tennessee). [No additional information.] Martha Foster (b. 1836, Tennessee). [No additional information.] Elizabeth Foster (b. 1839/40, Tennessee). [Subject of this article]. Andrew J. Foster (b. Feb. 15, 1842, East Tennessee; m. Anna C. 1873; d. 1928, State Soldiers Home, Orting, Washington). Francis Marion Foster (b. Jan. 1846, Arkansas; m. Emily Jane Coffelt Aug. 5, 1866, Jasper Co., Missouri; d. February 7, 1928, Joplin, Missouri.)[1].

In 1850, the Jarrett Foster family appears in Jackson Tp., District 41, Jasper Co., Missouri, according to the census record for that year. The listing shows:

Jarrett Foster, age 55, engaged in farming, b. South Carolina Dorcas Foster, age 49, b. South Carolina (person over 20 unable to read or write) Lucinda J. Foster, age 22, b. Tennessee (reading/writing column left blank) Sarah Foster, age 20, b. Tennessee (attending school) Martha E. Foster, age 14, b. Tennessee (attending school) Elizabeth Foster, age 10, b. Tennessee (attending school) Andrew J. Foster, age 8, b. Tennessee (attending school) Francis M. Foster, age 4, b. Tennessee[2].

The 1850 Census also shows another family residing in District 41–a primarily rural area–listed as follows:

John Shirley, age 54, engaged in farming, b. Virginia Eliza Shirley, age 49, b. Virginia; Charlotte A. Shirley, age 12, b. Indiana; John A. M. Shirley, age 8, b. Missouri; Myra Shirley, age 2, b. Missouri; Benton Shirley, age 9 mos., b. Missouri[3].

Myra Maybelle Shirley grew up to become the Bandit Queen– Belle Starr.

John Shirley has often been labeled the “black sheep” of the family who eventually moved to Indiana and married and divorced twice in that state. His third wife, Eliza Pennington-sometimes referred to as Eliza Hatfield-came from the Hatfield-McCoy vendetta in West Virginia and Kentucky. They were married May 29, 1837 in Green Tp., Grant Co., Indiana. According to the Walters Family Tree at Ancestry.com, John Shirley’s oldest son was Preston Raymond Shirley, and he was born to John and his first wife, Nancy Fowler. John and his first wife were married April 6, 1818 in Clark Co., Indiana. John’s second wife was Fannie, whom he married in 1829. Preston married Mary A. Chelson on May 26, 1847, Jasper Co., Missouri and appears on the 1850 Census in a separate household in District 41[4].

Undoubtedly, the two families knew each other. The Foster and Shirley parents were in the same age group and came from the same region of the country. Martha and Elizabeth Foster may have associated with Charlotte Shirley and probably with Myra Maybelle as well. Despite John Shirley’s tendency toward the wild side, the Shirley line in Virginia extends back to some of the finest families in the region. Shirley and Foster ancestors intermarried over the years, so the girls were possibly distant cousins.

Fortune changed for the John Shirley family. In 1856, Shirley sold his farm and moved into the town of Carthage, the county seat of Jasper County, where he built an inn, tavern, livery stable and a blacksmith shop-an enterprise that took up a whole city block! This tavern eventually became a rendezvous for a number of Missouri outlaws including the James brothers, the Younger brothers, and others. Needless to say, the Shirleys  became quite wealthy and spoiled their daughter, Myra, with all the material things that money could buy[5]. According to American Legends: Old West Legends-Belle Starr-The Bandit Queen:

At first, Myra Belle lived the life of a spoiled, rich girl, attending the Carthage Female Academy, where in addition to the basics, she was taught music and classical languages. She was a bright student, with polite manners, and a talent for playing the piano. However, she also liked to flaunt her status a “rich girl” and liked having an audience. She also loved the outdoors, where she spent many a day roaming the countryside with her older brother Bud, who taught her how to ride a horse and handle a gun [6].

I remember reading an old newspaper account about Belle Starr years ago in The Cedar Rapids Gazette stating that the outlaws and bushwhackers who later frequented her father’s establishment taught her how to curse and swear! I may still have that article in an old scrapbook.

Elizabeth Foster no doubt witnessed young Myra’s activities. Quite possibly, she developed a feeling of envy.  Glamor, danger, and excitement appealed to young Elizabeth. And Myra Maybelle Shirley definitely had all of those “qualities.”

The balance of the 1850s passed quietly for these people. Then came the 1860s.

The 1860 Census for Jasper Co., Missouri shows the Jarrett Foster family still residing in Marion Tp., Jasper Co., Missouri (located north of Carthage), but with fewer members: 60 year-old Jarrett Foster; 57 year-old Dorcas; 19 year-old Elizabeth; 18 year-old Andrew J.; and, 14 year-old Francis M. The other children are gone, whether through marriage or death. The listing for the John Shirley family shows 66 year-old John Shirley; 45 year-old Eliza; 18 year-old Allison; 12 year-old Myra; 11 year-old Edwin; 8 year-old Mansfield; and, 2 year-old Cravens. The John Shirley Census record is dated June 28, 1860 while the Jarrett Foster Census record is dated July 3, 1860. But these two census records aren’t the only important records for 1860. 1860 was a banner year for marriages in the Foster family[7].

The 1860 Marriage Record Book for Jasper County shows the following:

John Foster to Julia Ann Coffelt. [The date is unreadable. This would be a second marriage for John’s wife since they are shown on the 1860 Census in the town of Jasper, Jasper Co., Missouri with a blended family of Fosters and Coffelts.]

Jeremiah Foster to Sarah Jane Keith. April 13, 1860. [As yet I do not know the relationship between Jeremiah Foster and Jarrett Foster.

Elizabeth Foster to John D. Jones December 20, 1860[8]

Thus began a new chapter in the life of Elizabeth Foster Jones.

A son of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence Jones, John David Jones was born in 1827 in Davidson Co., Tennessee. John David Jones and John Bass Jones were first cousins [See Part 1 of this article.] The Lewis Jones Family and the Daniel Spence Family left Tennessee for Jasper Co., Missouri in 1836. Daniel’s oldest brother, Samuel, followed them there the following year in 1837. In 1840, Samuel and Elizabeth Inman Spence donated land for the first church building in Southwest Missouri. Located at Moss Springs, the land became the location of the Freedom Baptist Church and a cemetery called Moss Springs. The church was organized in May 1840 and operated until it was disbanded in 1880. While the old church building was torn down in the late 1800s, the cemetery still exists and is currently well maintained.

Members and builders of the church in 1840 included Elder Greenville Spencer (1840-1853); Jetson M. Keith (Clerk) (1848); Samuel and Elizabeth Spence (donated land for the church); Daniel Spence, Woodson Angel, William Clow, Jeremiah Gilstrap, Jacob Hammer, Ephraim Jenkins, James Jones, John Jones, Lewis Jones, Captain Nelson Knight, Joseph Schultz, and William H. Farmer[9]

John Jones, who is listed on this monument, was the father of John Bass Jones. James Jones and Lewis Jones–the husband of Milly Catherine Spence–were brothers.

Lewis Jones died in September 1849 and his son, John David Jones, became head of the family. The Jones farm was located in District 41 (where the Fosters and Shirleys lived.) The Fosters and Shirleys were still living there in 1850 when the John D. Jones family appeared on the 1850 census in District 41 for Jasper County, as follows:

John D. Jones, age 22, born in Tennessee Milly Jones, age 48, born in North Carolina. (She was the widow of Lewis Jones and mother of John.) Nancy J, age 18, born in Tennessee. (Milly’s daughter and John D.’s sister) James R., age 15, born in Tennessee. (Milly’s son and John D.’s brother).

[Milly Spence Jones was a person over 20 who could not read or write. The others were able to do so][10].

By 1860, the family appears as follows:

Milly Jones, age 58 John D. Jones, age 31 James R. Jones, age 25 John L. Jones, age 14, b. Missouri George W. Jones, age 12, b. Missouri Laurlin Jones, age 7, b. Missouri Daniel Gill, age 19, b. Tennessee Norris F. Hood, age 28, b. Tennessee Nancy J. Hood, age 28, b. Tennessee Laura E. Hood, age 3, b. Missouri Alice A. Hood, age 3, b. Missouri Charles A. Hood, age 1, b. Missouri[11].

Milly Jones’ house became a sea of activity. Her daughter, Nancy, married Norris F. Hood, and the Hood children were theirs. Daniel Gill was a son of Michael and Rhoda Spence Gill (Rhoda was Milly’s sister). John L. Jones (age 14), George W. Jones (age 12), and Lurlin Jones (age 7), all born in Missouri, came from one of the Jones families in the area, but as yet, I haven’t identified that family. John D. Jones and Elizabeth Foster married December 20, 1860, and one more person entered the household. Then the Civil War erupted the following year, rendering a permanent impact on the lives of these people.

The Battle of Carthage was fought July 5, 1861 on a field nine to ten miles north of Carthage. Often labeled the first land battle of the Civil War, the fight ended in a victory for the South. According to the National Park Service:

“Brig. Gen. Nathaniel Lyon had chased Governor Claiborne Jackson and approximately 4,000 State Militia from the State Capital at Jefferson City and from Boonville, and pursued them. Col. Franz Sigel led another force of about 1,000 into southwest Missouri in search of the governor and his loyal troops.

“Upon learning that Sigel had encamped at Carthage, on the night of July 4, Jackson took command of the troops with him and formulated a plan to attack the much smaller Union force. The next morning, Jackson closed up to Sigel, established a battle line on a ridge ten miles north of Carthage, and induced Sigel to attack him.

“Opening with artillery fire, Sigel closed to the attack. Seeing a large Confederate force-actually unarmed recruits-moving into the woods on his left, he feared that they would turn his flank. He withdrew. The Confederates pursued, but Sigel conducted a successful rearguard action.

“By evening, Sigel was inside Carthage and under cover of darkness; he retreated to Sarcoxie. The battle had little meaning, but the pro-Southern elements in Missouri, anxious for any good news, championed their first victory.” Location of the Battle: Jasper County, Missouri

Purpose of Campaign: Operations to Control Missouri during 1861

Date of the battle: July 5, 1861

Principal Commanders: Col. Franz Sigel [US] Governor Claiborne Jackson [CSA]

Forces Engaged: Brigade [US] Missouri State Guard divisions [CSA]

Estimated Casualties: 244 total (US 44; CSA 200) (From the Awesome Stories Website)[12].

The Battle of Wilson’s Creek occurred the following month on August 10, 1861:

Brig. Gen. Nathaniel Lyon’s Army of the West was camped at Springfield, Missouri, with Confederate troops under the commands of Brig. Gen. Benjamin McCulloch approaching. On August 9, both sides formulated plans to attack the other. At about 5:00 a.m. on August 10, Lyon, in two columns commanded by himself and Col. Franz Sigel, attacked the Confederates on Wilson’s Creek about 12 miles (19 km) southwest of Springfield. Rebel cavalry received the first blow and fell back away from Bloody Hill. Confederate forces soon rushed up and stabilized their positions.

The Confederates attacked the Union forces three times that day but failed to break through the Union line. When General Lyon was killed during the battle and General Sweeny wounded, Major Samuel D. Sturgis assumed command. Meanwhile, the Confederates had routed Sigel’s column, south of Skegg’s Branch. Following the third Confederate attack, which ended at 11:00 a.m., the Confederates withdrew. Sturgis realized, however, that his men were exhausted and his ammunition was low, so he ordered a retreat to Springfield. The Confederates were too disorganized and ill-equipped to pursue. This Confederate victory buoyed southern sympathizers in Missouri and served as a springboard for a bold thrust north that carried Price and his Missouri State Guard as far as Lexington. In late October, a rump convention, convened by Governor Claiborne Fox Jackson, met in Neosho and passed out an ordinance of secession. Wilson’s Creek, the most significant 1861 battle in Missouri, gave the Confederates control of southwestern Missouri. (From CWSAC Battle Summaries Website, The American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, Available online at http://www.cr.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/mo004.htm[13].

Frank James, the brother of Jesse James, fought at Wilson’s Creek, and returned home to Clay County as the “conquering hero.” Young Jesse must have greeted him with a feeling of pride and envy. However, Frank’s victory was short-lived the following spring at the Battle of Pea Ridge in Arkansas. The Wikipedia site notes:

The Battle of Pea Ridge (also known as Elkhorn Tavern) was a land battle of the American Civil War, fought on March 6-8, 1862, at Pea Ridge in northwest Arkansas, near Garfield. In the battle, Union forces led by Brig. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis defeated Confederate troops under Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn. The outcome of the battle essentially cemented Union control of Missouri. The battle was one of the few during the war in which a Confederate army outnumbered its Union opponent[14].

Frank James was sick with the measles in Springfield, Missouri, where he was taken prisoner by the Union Army. At that stage in the war, both sides waited until they had a certain number of prisoners. Then they would exchange them. Frank James signed a promise not to fight any more. Perhaps he had his fingers crossed.

The people of Jasper Co., Missouri were caught up in the middle of the conflict, and feelings ran high. Families were divided in their allegiances. Bushwhacker activity was high in the area, targeting their attacks on Union sympathizers. There are many unmarked graves in the Moss Springs Cemetery of people who were killed during this time-a practice followed to keep enemies from digging up the graves and dumping bodies on top of the ground, or hauling them off to let them rot in a field.  Western Missouri was a scene of constant conflict during the Civil War. Highway 71, which runs north and south from Kansas City through Carthage to the Arkansas border, saw constant movement of Confederate troops while Highway 69 on the Kansas side-running north and south between Kansas City, Kansas and Fort Scott, Kansas down to the Oklahoma border–witnessed similar activity involving Union troops. John Shirley’s hotel in Carthage became a gathering point for Quantrill’s men. Shirley’s association with Clay County personalities dated back to the early 1850s when his name appeared on a deed in a land transaction involving Harry W. Younger (Henry [Harry] Washington Younger)-the father of Cole Younger-for 160 acres of land in Jasper County[15]. Shirley was Younger’s assignee in that transaction, which was dated June 1, 1850. In addition, John Shirley’s son, John (“Bud”) Alexander Shirley, and his future son-in-law James C. Reed both served with Quantrill. Bud was a captain in the outfit. Myra Maybelle Shirley (the future Belle Starr) assisted Quantrill by informing the guerillas of Union troop movements. The Shirley family was closely tied to the James and Younger families of Clay County. The Reed family lived in Bates and Vernon Counties, north of Jasper County.

The Quantrill raid and massacre at Lawrence, Kansas occurred August 21, 1863. Four days later, Order No. 11 was issued by Gen. Thomas Ewing on August 25. This order impacted the lives of southern sympathizers in four western Missouri counties: Bates, Cass, Jackson and Vernon. The Order mandated that all non-Union sympathizers be expelled from the county and ordered their homes burned. Many innocent people who were not involved in guerilla activities were impacted by this order. In addition, many of the enforcers were Kansas volunteers who were not especially fond of Missourians. Expelling pro-Southerners from the four counties greatly impacted neighboring counties and other areas throughout the region. And violence continued.

In 1864, the John Shirley family fled to Sycene, Texas shortly before Carthage was burned, a fire that destroyed his enterprise. John Shirley’s guerilla-fighting son “Bud” was killed in Sarcoxie that same year [16].

The Samuel Spence family was divided during the Civil War. Some pro-Union members of the family relocated to safer areas in Kansas for the duration of the war (Lazarus Spence and William David Spence–my second great-grandfather, for example). The pro-Southern side of the family split into two groups. The earliest group to leave Missouri settled in Benton Co., Arkansas while the rest of the family remained in Jasper County until they were no longer safe there. Then they fled to Grayson Co., Texas. Some of them remained in Grayson County, while others eventually relocated to Washington Co., Arkansas. One of Samuel’s sons, Newton Jasper Spence (1841-1882), fought with the Confederate Army at Helena, Arkansas, where he was wounded and taken prisoner. He was placed in Alton Prison in Illinois, and was later transferred to Fort Delaware. When he was finally paroled at the end of the war, he did not return to Jasper County. His life was in danger there. So he settled in Oklahoma, married and raised his family there[17].

The John David Jones family appears to have remained in Jasper County as long as they could. John and Elizabeth’s first child-a son-Thomas A. Jones-was born in 1862. A daughter-Hettie-was born in 1864. William H. Jones was born in 1866. 1880 Census records indicate that all three of these children were born in Missouri. In all likelihood, the family was largely pro-Southern, although they didn’t engage in guerilla activities. If they were forced to leave, they would have relocated to Benton Co., Arkansas (where a number of John’s Joneses had already settled).

By August 8, 1865, Jarrett Foster was living in Marmaton, Bourbon Co., Kansas with his wife Dorcas and their two sons: A. J. Foster (age 23), who served in the 2nd Kansas Battery, and Marion Foster (age 19), where they appear on the tax records. Jarrett Foster’s family is next shown on the 1870 Census for Westralia, Montgomery Co., Kansas, where G. Foster (age 73), D. Foster (age 67), A. J. Foster (age 27), A. Price (age 15), and W. H. Evilsizer (age 19) appear. Dorcas’s name does not appear on the 1875 tax record for Cherokee Tp., Montgomery Co., Kansas, so she would have died between 1870 and 1875. F. M. Foster (age 27), E. J. Foster (age 29), James ?? (age 7) appear on the record with 79-year old Jarrett. Jarrett Foster died between 1875 and 1880[18],[19]

The John David Jones family members were all at home the Spring of 1867 when John Bass Jones arrived in Jasper County and stayed with them. John Bass Jones was shot and killed early in the morning of April 17-a case that is still a mystery. Family members all participated in the coroner’s inquest in 1867, but no charges were filed at that time. There was not enough evidence to charge anyone. The Joneses remained in Jasper County and then on September 28, 1870, John David Jones died. He is buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery in the same row with John Bass Jones.

The prospects for a widow in the late nineteenth century were few and far between. Elizabeth Foster Jones was 29 years old when her husband died. She was also pregnant with their fourth child. John Charles Jones was born January 27, 1871 in Fidelity, Jasper Co., Missouri.

Elizabeth probably took stock of her life and her options during this period of time. She did not look forward to staying on the farm with a house full of in-laws. And there had to be more excitement in life than cleaning, cooking, and having babies. At some point, she made the determination to leave her children with her mother-in-law and visit her family in Kansas for a while. No doubt she told the Joneses that she might be gone for a month or two. She needed to get away for a while. So she left Jasper County and joined her family in Westralia, Montgomery Co., Kansas.

Undoubtedly, she was at a low point when she arrived in Kansas. But her family members no doubt cheered her up with stories. After all, she once knew so many people! Whatever happened to them? That’s when Belle Shirley’s name came up in the conversation with the year 1866 as a starting point. “1866?” Elizabeth must have wondered. “That was the year before John Bass Jones was murdered!”

In 1866, the James-Younger Gang is credited with robbing the bank in Liberty, Missouri. Jesse and Frank James and the Younger boys fled to Texas, where they met up with the Shirley family once again. On November 1, 1866, Belle married James C. Reed, her old flame from Missouri. A picture has recently surfaced on the internet from that wedding. [Stories about her love affair with Cole Younger are exaggerated.] Those in attendance included Jesse and Frank James (and their little half-brother, Perry Samuel), Confederate General Joseph Shelby, John Newman Edwards (the newspaper man who promoted the James Gang), Archie Clement, Jim Younger, William Gregg, and John “King” Fisher[20]. At the time of their marriage, Jim Reed had not committed any acts that would classify him as an outlaw-something that appealed to Belle’s family. By 1867, Jim and Belle Shirley Reed were living on the Reed farm in Missouri. According to the American Legends website:

“But, when the two moved to Missouri, Reed was a wanted man, allegedly for murdering a man named Shannon. The two fled to California with their young daughter Pearl and before long a second child came along who they named Edward. In 1869 Belle, Reed and two other outlaws rode to the North Canadian river country, where they tortured an old Creek Indian until he told them where he had hidden $30,000 in gold. With their share of the loot, Jim and Belle returned to Texas, where she played the role of “Bandit Queen” to the hilt”[21].

When Elizabeth began hearing stories concerning the activities of her childhood acquaintance, she no doubt fantasized about those stories. Belle was leading a dangerous lifestyle but to Elizabeth, that lifestyle was more preferable to her own allotment in life.

In her testimony given at the 1880 grand jury investigation into the death of John Bass Jones, Elizabeth Ady claims to have married William Spencer after the death of her husband, John David Jones -then “dumped” him and went to Galena, Kansas, where she lived on Red Hot Street, where she supposedly met A. J. Ady. I have yet to find a license for her marriage to either A. J. Ady or to William Spencer, so I don’t know where or exactly when they were married. And the town of Galena, Kansas did not “boom” until lead was discovered there in 1877. A problem exists with the timeline of her testimony. After piecing together census records, tax records and the births of her children, I may have found some of the answers.

Elizabeth no doubt divided her time between Jasper Co., Missouri-where her children were staying– and Montgomery Co., Kansas-where her family members lived. By 1873, she met A. J. Ady in Kansas. How or where is open to speculation.

According to the 1850 Census for Geneva, Jennings, Indiana, Andrew J. Ady was born in Ohio about 1842 to Loyd and Elizabeth M. Ady. The household includes: Loyd Ady (age 38); Elizabeth M. Ady (age 30); Loyd L. D. Ady (age 10); Andrew J. Ady (age 8); Nancy A. Ady (age 6); Isaac S. B. Ady (age 3); Lucinda Ady (age 1); Lovina C. Fola (age 19); Samuel Fola (age 3); William H. Fola (age 1) [22].

In 1862, Andrew J. Ady (spelled Adye) appears on the tax list for District 2, Bridgeport, Indiana as a retail liquor dealer. By 1865, he was in Clarke Tp., in District 2, Indiana, where he is listed as a retail dealer, and he is taxed for a carriage, a gold watch, and he is also taxed for his income[23]. In 1866, he is listed in Adyville, Indiana and is taxed as a retail dealer who has a carriage and a gold watch. In December 1866, he had moved to Illinois, where he was taxed for keeping a stallion. He next appears on the March 1, 1875 tax records for Wild Cat, Howard Co., Kansas with a wife and a daughter. When analyzed, this record becomes quite interesting and invites further speculation[24].

Andrew Ady no doubt arrived in Kansas as a whisky drummer. If Elizabeth Foster Jones was really looking for a life style similar to that of her old acquaintance (Belle Shirley), she may have started seeking companionship in nearby towns. She kept a low profile as she didn’t want to alert her family to her new enterprise. A flashy drummer with a line of gab, a stylish carriage, a stallion and a gold watch would have captured her interest almost immediately. I doubt there was much of a courtship. She would have married him immediately and sent word back to Missouri that she had remarried. No doubt she planned to return for her children as soon as possible. In all likelihood, she did not tell A.J. about the children from her first marriage.

Before she knew it, she was expecting. A. J. settled down in Howard County to become a farmer-something Elizabeth didn’t plan on or like. Their daughter (whose name is known only by the initials M.E.) was born in 1874 and was one year old by the 1875 tax record. Elizabeth appears to have been creative with her information on that tax record. It’s possible that she never used her real name with A.J. She knew that he had lived in Indiana, so she gave Decatur Co., Indiana as her place of birth. (She really didn’t want to advertise the fact that she was born in Tennessee while living in Kansas!) She also made herself 10 years younger when giving her age, claiming to have been born about 1853. And she is listed only as Mrs. A. J. Ady. The other females on the page list a regular full first name, or else they use their own initials [25].

The little daughter whose name is only listed as M.E. must have died within the year. She is not listed after that record. And in 1875, Elizabeth discovered that she was pregnant again. I doubt she shared this news with her husband. She was not happy living on the farm with A. J. Ady, and she wanted to return to Missouri where her children were living. She knew that Milly Catherine Spence Jones was aging, and she felt a desperate need to get back there. She managed to slip away at the first opportune moment and may have obtained her brother’s help in returning to Missouri.

Her son, Earl E. Jones, was born in 1875 or 1876, probably after her return to Missouri. I can only imagine the story that she told the Jasper County people-that she had married a man named Jones in Kansas, and that he had died or disappeared. She did not share the Ady name with the Jasper County people at that time. But she was identified as Mrs. A. J. Ady during the April 1880 Grand Jury investigation. A Mr. Ady supposedly accompanied her from Kansas. She may have returned to Kansas, reunited with A. J. Ady, and then returned to Missouri with him for the hearing. After the hearing was over, she left him again for good and returned to Missouri. And there is another possibility: she may have been living with another man who returned to Missouri with her, posing as A. J. Ady!

Meanwhile, back in Kansas, Andrew J. Ady had no idea what happened to his wife on either occasion. After the second time, he finally gave up looking for her. By 1885, he is shown on the tax list for Boulder Co., Colorado-single-where he is listed as a miner. But he later remarried[26] By 1895, he appears on the tax list for Richland Tp., Gray Co., Kansas. His wife Amelia was from Germany[27] The family appears on the 1900 Census for Hess Tp., Gray Co., Kansas (located in southwest Kansas) as follows: Andrew J. Ady (spelled Aday) (b. April 1842, Ohio); Amelia M. (b. October 1860, Germany); Esther H. (b. July 1891, Kansas); Lafayette J. (b. Dec. 1893, Kansas); Cora B. (b. April 1898, Kansas); Dora A. (b. April 1898, Kansas) [28]. Andrew J. Ady died between that 1900 Census and the 1920 Census, probably in Whatcom County, Washington. Amelia last appears on the 1920 census for Whatcom Co., Washington as a widow living with Esther and Lafayette[29].

Milly Catherine Spence Jones died either shortly before or shortly after Elizabeth’s first return to Jasper County. I have found two dates of death for her. One is November 30, 1875. The other is March 1876. Either way, Elizabeth arrived just in time to reclaim her children from her first marriage[30][31].

She wasn’t in Jasper County for very long before realizing that she was in another predicament. She now had five children and no place where any of them could live. That’s when she turned her attention to William Spencer.

William Spencer had been living in Jasper Co., Missouri since the 1840s. Elizabeth would have remembered him from childhood. By 1875/1876, she was ready to settle down for a while and become reacquainted with her children. More than anything else, however, she wanted a new last name. She probably used the Jones name when she returned to Jasper County. She didn’t dare use the Ady name for fear A.J. Ady would find her. And she decided that Spencer would suit her just fine. After all, Spencer was a fine old name.

William Spencer was born May 4, 1817 in Hardin Co., Kentucky to Sharp Spencer (1770-1834) and Jenny Trigger Crady (1790-1844). His grandparents were John Spencer (1732-1789) and Rosanna Graves/Greaves (1735-1782). This is the same Graves/Greaves line I am descended from. Rosanna Graves/Greaves is my 1st cousin 7xs removed. Her father was Thomas Greaves/Graves (1691-1767), and her grandfather was John Greaves/Graves, Sr. (1665-1747)–my 7th great-grandfather. I descend from him through his daughter, Elizabeth Greaves (1707-1755)  and her husband James Spence (1702-1753)–my sixth great-grandparents!. So that explains the cousin relationship between the Jasper County, Missouri Spences and William Spencer! In addition, there is a connection between this Spencer line with John Spencer (b. 1788) and his second wife Rachel Key (b. 1805). Rachel was the sister of Lucy Key–Adeline Elizabeth Bryant Spence’s mother–and John Spencer was the half brother of William Spencer, under discussion here!. John was the son of Sharp Spencer and his first wife Martha Elizabeth Crenshaw (1772-1809). As yet, I haven’t determined how this Spencer line connects with mine through Elisha Spence’s first wife Susanna Spencer. That is something I’m still working on. But according to the Ancestry calculator, William Spencer is my 3rd cousin 5xs removed on the Greaves line!

On September 7, 1835, William Spencer married Jane Angel in Putnam Co., Indiana. (Her brother, Woodson Angel, was an original member of the Freedom Baptist Church at Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper Co., Missouri. His name appears on the monument at the cemetery entrance.) Jane Angel was born September 3, 1811 in Virginia to John Angel (1770-1850) and Isabella Truelove (1770-1850). The children of William Spencer and Jane Angel follow:

James Harvey Spencer 1832 – 1921 Mary Catherine SPENCER 1837 – 1912 Dorcas Tabitha Spencer 1841 – 1918 John M SPENCER 1841 – John Norris Spencer 1843 – Minerva J Spencer 1844 – William D SPENCER 1845 – Millie Emoline Spencer 1851 – 1916 Ananias SPENCER 1855 – 1936 [33].

William and Jane appear on the 1850 Census for Sarcoxie, Jasper Co., Missouri[34]. Pro-Union in sympathy, they were forced to leave Jasper County and appear on the May 5, 1865 Census for Mound City, Linn Co., Kansas, about 59 miles from Kansas City[35]. They returned to Jasper County after the war and on November 10, 1870, Jane Angel Spencer died. She is buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery. In 1876, William and Elizabeth were married. Their son William Hayes Spencer was born in 1877[36]. And after their son was born Elizabeth acquired the roving eye once again and started thinking about her options.

She did not want to stay married to William Spencer and have any more children by him. She left the Spencer baby with William and taking her own children from her first and second marriages, she probably headed for her brother’s house in Kansas. Francis Marion Foster was living in Cherokee, Montgomery Co., Kansas in 1875 but by 1880, he was in Coffeyville, Montgomery Co., Kansas[37]. William Spencer’s daughter, Milly E. Spencer, was in William’s household, along with a hired girl by the name of Lillie F. Slavens in 1880[38].

The Elizabeth Foster Jones Ady Spencer saga becomes really strange at this point, as can be seen in the 1880 Census for Jasper Co., Missouri. Two census records exist:

Union Tp, Jasper County, Missouri, June 22 and 23, 1880:

William Spencer (age 62) Elizabeth (age 39) [William’s wife] William Hayes (age 3) Lilly F. Slavens (age 16)-the hired servant Milly E. Spencer (age 27)-William’s daughter 2 Baby Spencer Girls (1 month old)-William and Elizabeth are designated the parents[39].

Elizabeth is described as debilitated and unable to leave her bed. She is supposed to have dysentery (called “flux” on the record). Not only that, the person giving the information knew very little about Elizabeth. According to the census record, Elizabeth was born in Indiana–she was actually born in Tennessee. The census record indicates Elizabeth’s parents were born in North Carolina. Both of Elizabeth’s parents were born in South Carolina. I don’t believe Elizabeth was in the house at all, based on the second record.

The second record is for Elizabeth Ady in the City of Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri June 14, 1880:

Elizabeth Ady (age 39) Thomas A. Jones (age 18)-son Hettie D. Jones (age 16)-daughter William H. Jones (age 13)-son John C. Jones (age 8)-son Earl E. Jones (age 5)-son[40].

Her next door neighbor is Edward S. Pike, the deputy sheriff referred to in the newspaper account of the grand jury investigation. (See Part 1 of this article). J. B. Buchanan also appears on the same street.

Another curiosity about this situation centers around the two unnamed one-month-old twin baby girl Spencers in William Spencer’s household on the 1880 Census. They would have been born in May. The grand jury investigation was the month before that in early April. If Elizabeth had been the mother, she would have been pregnant when she testified before the grand jury. If they were her babies, then she had them delivered to William Spencer after they were born. She was already living in Carthage in early April and not at William Spencer’s farm. Perhaps they had an agreement between them. He would provide her with a house in town if she would give him the child after it was born and trouble him no further. (They probably didn’t know that two children were expected.) She appears to have gladly given them up. William Hayes Spencer (who was 3 years old in 1880) also stayed with William. I think she also agreed not to use the Spencer name. And perhaps the Jones family did not want her using their name either. So, she became Elizabeth Ady once again. Sources in Kansas may have informed her that A.J. Ady had left for Colorado and was no longer in the area.

William Spencer died December 23, 1888 in Jasper Co., Missouri and is buried next to his first wife, Jane Angel Spencer, in the Moss Springs Cemetery. The charges against him and the other men in the John Bass Jones murder were never filed because of the lack of evidence against them.

I do not know what happened to his daughter, Milly E. Spencer, who was taking care of the young children, or to the young children. The two infants may not have survived. William Hayes Spencer may have grown to maturity, but I don’t think he remained in the Jasper County area. And true to Elizabeth’s nature, she did not remain Elizabeth Ady very long.

According to the 1850 Census for Brandon Tp, Rensselaer Co., New York, William Beman was the son of Martin Beman (b. 1810, Vermont) and his wife Laura (b. 1813, Vermont). William appears on that census at age 20, and he is listed as a laborer. He also has a 16 year-old sister named Laura. Both William and his sister were born in New York [41].

By 1860, William resided in Wisconsin, where he appears on the 1860 Census for Farmington, Jefferson County, Wisconsin with a 22 year-old-wife named Mary. William is described as a railroad laborer. A Conner family resides with them, whose head, Migane Conner, also works for the railroad[42].

The Bemans next appear on the 1870 census for Washington, Daviess Co., Indiana, where William appears as a “roade master.” (He worked for the railroad.) His wife Mary, is still listed with him. William and Mary Beman do not have any children[43].

Finally, William Beman and his wife Mary appear on the 1880 Census for Boonville, Cooper Co., Missouri, where William is listed as a railroad track repairer[44]. Mary must have died by 1885, and William moved over to Jasper County, where he settled in Carl Junction, a town that is west of Carthage. And that’s where he met Elizabeth Foster Jones Spencer Ady.

By 1885, Elizabeth must have taken stock of herself once again. Many of the people she admired were now gone. Jesse James was killed in 1882. The Youngers were in prison. Frank James was “retired.” Her old childhood acquaintance, Belle Shirley (Belle Starr) had made quite a name for herself. In August 1874, her husband Jim Reed had been killed in a gunfight. Belle then took on a series of lovers beginning with Blue Duck and then marrying Sam Starr. By 1882, Belle Starr was celebrated as Queen of the Bandits by the popular press. She was caught trying to steal a neighbor’s horse. Judge Isaac Parker (the hanging judge) sentenced her to two consecutive six month terms in prison and her husband to one year in prison. After their release, the Starrs returned to Younger’s Bend in Arkansas, where they continued their rustling and bootlegging activities. [Sam Starr was eventually killed in a gunfight in 1886.] Belle then married Jim July–a marriage full of discord. She would eventually be killed when an unknown assailant shot her off her horse on February 3, 1889. Belle Starr died at the age of 41.][45]. I remember reading that after her death, her daughter Pearl had her buried with all her gold inside her coffin. Grave robbers knew that story, broke into the coffin and stole all the gold! (Doubt Belle would have had use for it by then!)

After establishing herself in Carthage, Elizabeth was probably seeking less excitement and more stability. At the same time, she didn’t want to marry another farmer. She liked city life and had no desire to move back to the country. Her children were growing up and more than anything else, she did not want to live alone. And that’s when she met William Beman.

Apparently, he was exactly the man she was seeking. He had the same gift of gab that attracted her originally to Andrew J. Ady and no ambitions for farming whatsoever-or so she thought! William had lived many places and experienced many things, and his stories could entertain her for hours. They were married August 11, 1886 in Carthage, Jasper Co., Missouri[46]. The 1900 Census finds them in Twin Grove, Jasper Co., Missouri, where William is listed as a farmer! The census record indicates that he was born in August 1829 in New York and that Elizabeth was born in November 1840 in Tennessee[47].

Elizabeth’s 16-year-old-grandson, Earl Jones, (who was born September 1883 in Missouri) was living with them in 1900. His parents were Thomas A. and Nancy Jones (Elizabeth’s oldest son). Thomas and Nancy were married May 7, 1881, although he seems to have had two marriages. His second wife was Mary Sabrit Thornhill. Thomas died in Carthage, Missouri October 12, 1942[48].

Concerning the rest of Elizabeth’s children:

Hettie D. Jones, (b. 1864) who appears on the 1880 Census in the Elizabeth Ady household. No further information. She may have died by 1900.

William H. Jones (age 33) and his wife Albirdia (age 30) appear on the 1900 Census, Twin Grove Tp., (Carl Junction), Jasper Co., Missouri with their children: Glen R. Jones (age 10) and Neal Jones (age 1)[49]. Some family records on Ancestry.com state that William had two marriages and that his first wife’s name was Amy. However, William and Alberta were married November 6, 1889 in Jasper County[50]. William H. and Alberta appear on the 1920 Census for Jackson Tp., Jasper Co., Missouri with their children: Neal C. Jones (Age 20) and Walter L. Jones (age 12)[51]. William H. Jones died in Jasper Co., Missouri in 1939[52].

John C. Jones (age 48) appears on the 1920 Census for Pineville, McDonald Co., Missouri with his wife Hattie (age 46) and their children: Ray Jones (age 24); William Jones (age 22); Charles Jones (age 19); Louis Jones (age 18); Grace Jones (age 15); Harold Jones (age 9)[53]. John Charles Jones died June 27, 1924 in Pineville, McDonald Co., Missouri[54].

Earl E. Jones, (b. 1875) who appears on the 1880 Census in the Elizabeth Ady household. No further information. He may have died young.

I believe William Beman died shortly after the 1900 Census since I could find nothing further about him.

Apparently the Bemans returned to Daviess Co., Indiana shortly after the 1900 census was taken. William had lived there previously. The July 3, 1902 issue of the Carthage Press notes the following: Fidelity–Elizabeth, wife of William Spencer, formerly of this place, but now of Indiana, died Sunday, June 22[55].

Thus ends the odyssey of Elizabeth Foster Jones Spencer Ady Beman. But the question still remains: Who killed John Bass Jones?

The whole grand jury investigation against the Jasper County men the Spring of 1880 was prompted by political motives on the part of certain individuals who wanted to take control of City Hall and eliminate potential challenges. The grand jury investigation occurred in April 1880. Elizabeth Ady significantly altered her testimony from that originally given at the coroner’s inquest shortly after the death of John Bass Jones. In 1867, she told the coroner’s jury and everyone else who would listen to her that she didn’t recognize any of the men who came to the door. They were all strangers and none of them wore masks. At the grand jury investigation in April 1880, however, she named names-although she didn’t name William Spencer–and she also threw in the information about living on Red Hot Street in Galena, Kansas.

I seriously doubt that she lived there at all. Galena didn’t become a boom town until 1877, and Red Hot Street was notorious. In describing the conflict between Galena and its rival Empire City, the Genuine Kansas website notes:

“The war between the towns became so bad that the main connecting link between the two cities became known as “Red Hot Street,” when feuding became so intense that doctors and undertakers began working nights and sleeping during the days. This feud, coupled with the countless miners, transients, and outlaws hiding within its midst provided a hotbed for violence.

In this section of the town were innumerable saloons and gambling halls that catered to murderers, outlaws, and gamblers. During this time, many hardworking miners were lured inside to lose their hard earned gold at the gaming tables and other questionable pastimes. Some were never seen again”[56].

Elizabeth tossed in her reference to “Red Hot Street” during her 1880 testimony as a taunt-and probably as a way of embarrassing and/or mortifying William Spencer! I am certain she found enough excitement in southeast Kansas to fill her day without visiting Red Hot Street!

The killing of John Bass Jones is a matter of speculation since identities of the perpetrators were never discovered. Bass was a Confederate sympathizer, who spent a considerable amount of time in Arkansas. He lived in Saline County with his wife (Note: they had just married prior to his death), and he spent time in Benton County with relatives and friends. Apparently, his visits to Jasper County were sporadic and caused concern that he planned to locate there permanently. Bass may have been aware of their concern, which would have led him to the statement described in the following segment of the testimony:

My name is D. S. Moss. I live on Jones Creek, seven miles southeast of Carthage; lived there since 1866. In 1867 Wm. Hood lived about two miles south of Mr. J. D. Jones, and one quarter of a mile from me, and Wm. Boss lived about three miles from me, and David Collins lived five and a half or six miles and James Greer about five miles, a little east of south. They all lived up Jones Creek from where I lived. Knew Wm. Spencer; he lived about one mile north and east of where I lived. I have seen John Bass Jones when he was a boy; saw him in 1867–in March 1867. John Bass and James Henry Jones stopped at my home; I did not see John Bass again till the morning of the 17th of April, 1867; he was laying in the road; he had been shot. Think there was eleven holes in his body. Think the shot in the head and the one in the heart would have produced death. Knew Boss; saw him first in 1866. Defendants all identified. Have known Wm. Spencer from my boyhood. I heard Wm. Boss say that John Bass Jones had made some remarkable threats against us blank Republicans that lived on Jones Creek; that he, Boss, had played off on Jones as a Democrat, and Jones had told him that he would go down to Arkansas and get a company of bushwhackers, and clean out all union men on Jones Creek. About the week after this conversation–Boss belonged to a society we had down there for mutual protection against thieves–we had a meeting, and Boss was there. I was chairman, and Boss said something about Jones. I don’t know who was vice president. ??? to Boss we were not attending to ??? Joneses then. Mr. Smith and Mr. Samuels made use of some abrupt language, and I got up and left[57].

The whole incident appears to have started with a rumor. John Bass Jones may or may not have actually made that statement, or he may have made a statement that was perceived by others as an actual threat. Someone took his threat seriously and hired a group of killers to kill him. No one recognized any of the men in the original coroner’s inquest of 1867. They were strangers from outside the community. They may have even been hired by someone from inside or outside the community who was either worried about John Bass Jones’ permanent residence in Jasper County or who was hoping to cause trouble in Jasper County.

Perhaps at some future date a deathbed confession will emerge from some dusty trunk that will solve the mystery.

 

References

[1] Jarrett B. Foster Overview, Cunningham/Webster Family Tree, Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[2] 1850 Census, Jackson Tp., District 41, Jasper Co., Missouri-Jarrett B. Foster. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[3] 1850 Census, District 41, Jasper Co., Missouri-John Shirley. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[4] John Shirley Overview-The Walters Family Tree. Available online at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[5] Belle Starr-The Bandit Queen. From the American Legends Website. Old West Legends. Available online at http://www.legendsofamerica.com/we-bellestarr.html

[6] 1860 Census Records, Jasper Co., Missouri: Jarrett B. Foster [Jackson Tp., District 41]-John Shirley [Marion Tp.]. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[7] Foster Marriage Records for 1860, Jasper Co., Missouri. Available online at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[8] List of Original Members and Builders of the Freedom Baptist Church, Entrance of the Moss Springs Cemetery, Moss Springs Cemetery Association, Jasper Co., Missouri

[9] 1850 Census, District 41, Jasper Co., Missouri, John D. Jones. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[10] 1860 Census, District 41, Jasper Co., Missouri, John D. Jones. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[11] “Battle of Carthage-Confederate Victory”-Awesome Stories: Story Place on the Web. Available online at http://www.awesomestories.com/assets/battle-of-carthage—confederate-victory

[12] CWSAC Battle Summaries Website, The American Battlefield Protection Program, Heritage Preservation Services, Available online at http://www.cr.nps.gov/hps/abpp/battles/mo004.htm

[13] “The Battle of Pea Ridge”-Available at the Wikipedia website: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Pea_Ridge

[14] U. S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management. The Official Land Records Site. John Shirley and Harry W. Younger Land Patent (1850). Available online at http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/

[15] Belle Starr-The Bandit Queen. From the American Legends Website. Old West Legends. Available online at http://www.legendsofamerica.com/we-bellestarr.html

[16] Newton Jasper Spence Family Records. Mora Spence. Ca. 1995.

[17] 1865 Tax List, Marmaton, Bourbon Co., Kansas, Jarrett B. Foster. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[18] 1870 Census for Westralia, Montgomery Co., Kansas, G. Foster. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[19] 1875 tax record for Cherokee Tp., Montgomery Co., Kansas. Jarrett B. Foster. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[20] “Wedding in the Woods”–Belle Starr Wedding Photo. Posted on Pinterest by Beverly Bauser, Found on theelliscollection.com

[21] Belle Starr-The Bandit Queen. From the American Legends Website. Old West Legends. Available online at http://www.legendsofamerica.com/we-bellestarr.html

[22] 1850 Census for Geneva, Jennings, Indiana, Andrew J. Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[23] 1865 Tax List, Clarke Tp., in District 2, Indiana, Andrew J. Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[24] 1875 Tax List, Wild Cat Tp., Howard Co., Kansas, Andrew J. Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[25] 1875 Tax List, Wild Cat Tp., Howard Co., Kansas, Andrew J. Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[26] 1885 Tax List, Boulder Co., Colorado. Andrew J. Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[27] 1895 Tax List for Richland Tp., Gray Co., Kansas, Andrew J. Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[28] 1900 Census for Hess Tp., Gray Co., Kansas, Andrew J. Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[29] 1920 Census, Whatcom Co., Washington, Amelia Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[30] Milly Catherine Spence Jones Overview, Forehand-Winslow Family Tree. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[31] Milly Catherine Spence Jones Overview, Henninger Family Tree. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[32] William Spencer Overview, Riddle Family Tree. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[33] William Spencer Overview, Riddle Family Tree. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[34] 1850 Census for Sarcoxie, Jasper Co., Missouri, William Spencer. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[35] 1880 Census, Union Tp., Jasper Co., Missouri, William Spencer. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[36] 1865 Census for Mound City, Linn Co., Kansas, William Spencer. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[37] 1880 Tax Records, Coffeyville, Montgomery Co., Kansas: Francis Marion Foster. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[38] 1880 Census for Union Tp., Jasper Co., Missouri, William Spencer. Available at Ancestry .com: http://www.ancestry.com

[39] 1880 Census for Union Tp., Jasper Co., Missouri, William Spencer. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[40] 1880 Census for Carthage, Jasper Co., Missouri, Elizabeth Ady. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[41] 1850 Census for Brandon Tp, Rensselaer Co., New York, William Beman. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[42] 1860 Census for Farmington, Jefferson County, Wisconsin, William Beman. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[43] 1870 Census, Washington, Daviess Co., Indiana, William Beman. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[44] 1880 Census, Boonville, Cooper Co., Missouri, William Beman. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[45] Belle Starr-The Bandit Queen. From the American Legends Website. Old West Legends. Available online at http://www.legendsofamerica.com/we-bellestarr.html

[46] William Beman Marriage Record; Jasper County Marriage Records; August 11, 1886

[47] 1900 Census, Twin Grove Tp., Jasper Co., Missouri; William Beman; Available at Ancestry.com; http://www.ancestry.com

[48] Thomas A. Jones Family Tree; Ancestry World Tree; Available at Ancestry.com; http://www.ancestry.com

[49] 1900 Census, Twin Grove Tp. (Carl Junction), Jasper Co., Missouri. William H. Jones. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[50] William H. Jones Marriage Record; Jasper County Marriage Records; November 6, 1889 [51] 1920 Census, Jackson Tp., Jasper Co., Missouri, William H. Jones. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[51] William H. Jones Family Tree; Ancestry World Tree; Available at Ancestry.com; http://www.ancestry.com

[52] 1920 Census, Pineville, McDonald Co., Missouri, John C. Jones. Available at Ancestry.com: http://www.ancestry.com

[53] John Charles Jones Family Tree; Ancestry World Tree; Available at http://www.ancestry.com

[54] Death Notice about Elizabeth Ady Spencer (Wife of William Spencer), Carthage Press, Carthage, Missouri. July 3, 1902

[55] Genuine Kansas: Galena; Available online at http://www.genuinekansas.com/city_galena_kansas.htm

[57] “The So-Called Murder Case” from The Carthage Banner, August 1, 1880. Microfilm. Jasper County Public Library

 

 

 

Who Killed John Bass Jones– Part 1

 

 

John Bass Jones (1838-1867). Grave at Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

John Bass Jones (1838-1867). Grave at Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

 

 

Jasper Co., Missouri was the scene of turmoil before, during, and after the Civil War. After Order No. 11 was issued, southern-sympathizing families were forced out of the State. As a result, many families fled Missouri to resettle in the South. Grayson Co., Texas was a popular area for resettlement. Some families remained in Texas and did not explore other locations. Some stayed there briefly, only to relocate to states such as Arkansas. Those who settled in Arkansas either remained there for the rest of their lives, or they relocated to southern counties in Missouri in the late 1880s or 1890s. Since Jasper Co., Missouri was a center of Union activity and sentiment, few southern supporters returned there. If they did, they risked their lives. Such was the case of John Bass Jones, who was shot and killed in the early morning hours of April 17, 1867 by unknown assailants in Jasper County.

Bass (as he was called) left Missouri with members of the Jones and Hood families and appears to have settled at Sulphur Springs, Benton Co., Arkansas. As reported in an earlier article written on him, he also settled in  Saline County, Arkansas, where he met and married his future wife. (Click HERE for the earlier story written about John Bass Jones, his family and his wife.)  He returned to Jasper County in 1867, apparently planning to stay there. Instead, his bullet-riddled body was found on the road. Unknown assailants took him from the house where he was staying and fired 11 bullets into him.

A coroner’s inquest was held immediately after the killing, but no one was charged. Then the whole case suddenly came to life again in 1880. A number of prominent men were charged with the murder, and prosecution of the murder case was detailed in the Carthage Banner. I have incorporated the newspaper account below.

 

The So-Called Murder Case

From “The Carthage Banner, August 1, 1880

The Democratic Prosecution of Innocent Men for Murder

The Evidence In Full as Taken By a Banner Reporter

Prosecution of this case was conducted by prosecuting attorney McIntyre, assisted by W. C. Robinson and A. L. Thomas. Defense of the case was in the hands of L. H. Waters. U.S. District Attorney for the Western District of Missouri, and T. B. Hanghawout and W. H. Phillips.

“The well known ability of the counsel for the defense guarantees that the true animus of the prosecution will be thoroughly shown up, and the rights of the defendants maintained and protected. Of the twenty-four men sworn this morning, fifteen were accepted and the sheriff was ordered to get twenty-five more jurors. It will perhaps require today and tomorrow to fill the panel, as the case has been much talked of and has excited a great deal of just indignation in the breasts of good citizens all over the county. The readers of the BANNER shall be kept fully posted in every detail of the trial which will be come one of the most celebrated that ever occurred in the county” (The Carthage Banner, Thursday, March 25, 1880)

 

————————————

STATE OF MISSOURI VS. D.A. COLLINS, ET AL

The state after the forty men were qualified, called Geo. Miller, and asked him whether he had said anything about the case after he was qualified. He said that Wm. Motherspaw said to him, that the case would be short, as one of the witnesses had a bad character; also, that he had no prejudice or bias for or against the defendants.

Jasper said that he talked with him and said he did not like to be kept away from home, that the case would not amount to anything, as one of the witnesses has a very bad character; that is all he said about the case. The court then excluded Miller and fined him ten dollars [for comments made] as to Smith and Flemming.

State of Missouri vs. D. S. Collins, et al. Witnesses for State:

JAMES H. JONES

I was at John D. Jones’, seven miles south of Carthage, in April, 1867. J. D. and his wife, James Jones was there on the night of April 16th. Knew John Bass Jones in his life time. He had been in the county but a short time prior to that time. He left this county in 1866 and came back in 1867; he remained a week and went to Arkansas, remained about a week and came back on the night he was killed, came to John D. Jones, a fact; came from the direction of Wm. Hood’s. I was awoke by some one calling out. J. D. Jones called out that John Bass was in the house. They said, tell him to get up  and come to the door. John Bass got up and asked them what they wanted. They said they wanted him to go to town; he said he had no horse; they said they would furnish him a horse. He then came back and dressed, went out, and the last I heard him say was, even if I had done anything to die for, I would not care. Did not know any of the parties. He went out the west door; about five minutes after he was taken out I heard shots; seemed to be two volleys; saw the body next morning. The body was lying on its back, was eleven bullet holes in it. The house is on the west side of the creek. We were all sleeping in the same room, about twenty feet square; it was a light night; I saw some parties pass the window on the east side of the house. Wm. Boss lived on the widow Jones’ [Note: Milly Catherine Spence Jones, wife of Lewis Jones] farm in Newton county. John Bass claimed one-fifth interest in the farm at that time. I stayed in bed all the time until I heard the guns fired; then I got up and left.

Cross-Examined:

The doors were in the center of the house, on the east and west side. John Bass and myself slept in the south east corner. John David Jones was the man that said we were in the house; don’t know whether John David Jones got up or not; can’t tell whether Mrs. Ady was up when the men were there or not; think she was after the men had started from the door. This was about twelve miles from Granby; the road where the body was found is the road to Granby. We had a stable. John Bass did not bring his horse; did not recognize any of the men that passed by window; don’t know how many men were there were.

DANIEL G. JONES

I am twenty eight years old in August; live in Jasper County; lived at John D. Jones’ April 1867. Saw John Bass Jones there in April of that year. John Bass came there the night he was killed. Went to bed early. I slept upstairs. Did not wake during the night; got up in the morning, before day; saw Jones dead in the road, about two hundred yards from the house in the road. There was eleven bullet holes in the body: two in the body, one in his ear, one in his chin, and several in his leg. Defendant Greer lived about four miles southeast of Jones’ at that time. Boss lived about three miles. I saw Mr. Boss pass by our house the next morning; he stopped a moment and then rode off. This happened in Jasper County.

Cross-Examined:

I was not awake that night; they called me the next morning. There was no one to bed when I went to bed. John Bass came there about a week before this, on a black horse, he went to Arkansas on said horse. He came there before  breakfast. Don’t know whether he had had his breakfast or not.

M. HICKEY

Live six miles south. I lived there in 1867; was acquainted with John Bass Jones in 1867. The last time I ever saw him alive was in April, 1866. I saw his body afterwards in 1867, at the house of John Davy Jones; died in 1867, April 17th. On the night of the 16th I was on the bottom of the forks of Jones and Center Creek, hunting turkeys. When I started down it was clear; when I went home, it was twelve or one o’clock and clear. I lived about two miles from the bottom; as I went home I heard shooting, toward Dr. Moss’s. I was then about two miles and a half from John D. Jones when I heard the shots. Saw only two shots; one went in the right ear and came out at his chin; the other in his wrist. John D Jones lived about three and a half miles southeast of me. Wm. Hood lived about one-half miles from Jones, south. There was a right smart yard around J. D. Jones at that time. On the west side of the house there was a locust tree. John Bass Jones was about twenty-eight years old.

Cross-examined:

I was friendly with the Joneses. I have lived at where I now live since the war, except two years.

[Still for the Prosecution]

C. MITCHELL

Reside in Newton county; have lived there since August, 1866, about three miles from Wm. Boss; two miles east and one south. I was introduced to John Bass Jones by Mr. Boss, in March, 1867, I think. I recollect he was killed in the spring of the year, the same spring I was introduced to him. Mr. Boss said he was interested in the place he, Boss, lived on. The day before Jones was killed I was in the timber, north of Mr. Boss’ home, sawing timber. On my way home, I passed along the north end of Mr. Boss’ home. Boss was close to the barn, leading a horse. We saw Mr. Boss and we went to the timber and  Boss said it was all right to cut the timber. Mr. Jones said it was all right. Mr. Jones asked Boss if Jones had left us a French Furlough. Boss said he had heard so. When we saw it was at the house as we went home, Haines said, Boss, I thought Jones had left the country. Boss said yes. Haines said, I saw him but a short time before going up to Hood’s to stay all night. I said Jones said he was moving to Carthage. Boss said he must be seen to. I think that was all that was said. After we got across the creek I saw someone ride up the creek south; think it was Boss. He was riding toward where Greer was living. I told Boss that Jones told me that he had the power of attorney to bring suit to set aside deeds where property had been sold on bogus attachments, where parties were out of the country. The amount he had to settle was about forty or fifty thousand dollars.

Cross-Examined:

I went over to Boss’s to buy corn when I was introduced to Jones. I next saw Bass when I went over after ??? took out tools. We stopped at Boss’s to get permission to cut a couple of trees. Boss said it was all right, that Jones had no objection. We saw Jones in the evening. Jones asked us if we knew whose timber we were cutting. I told him we had bought the timber of Boss. Jones said it was all right. I did not know it was John Bass Jones until two days after. Jones was riding a horse. He went north when he left. The horse was a bay or sorrel. When I went to Boss’ house in the evening, Boss  was just leading a horse in the barn yard. I told Boss that Jones said he had the power to attorney to bring a number of suits for land in Jasper county that had been sold out on bogus attachment suits for damages against parties who had left the county.

JAMES H. JONES was by the court recalled for the purpose of permitting a juror to ask him a question. H. C. Warner, juror, asked him: What relation was John Bass Jones to you? My uncle. I went to Buckingham’s that night, and told them what I thought had occurred. State asked him what trees were on the west side of the house? Two–one locust tree and apple tree.

ELIZABETH ADY

My name is Elizabeth Ady. Live in Carthage. Lived on Jones Creek in 1867. My name was Jones.

S. MOSS

My name is D. S. Moss. I live on Jones Creek, seven miles southeast of Carthage; lived there since 1866. In 1867 Wm. Hood lived about two miles south of Mr. J. D. Jones, and one quarter of a mile from me, and Wm. Boss lived about three miles from me, and David Collins lived five and a half or six miles and James Greer about five miles, a little east of south. They all  lived up Jones Creek from where I lived. Knew Wm. Spencer; he lived about one mile north and east of where I lived. I have seen John Bass Jones when he was a boy; saw him in 1867–in March 1867. John Bass and James Henry Jones stopped at my home; I did not see John Bass again till the morning of the 17th of April, 1867; he was laying in the road; he had been shot. Think there was eleven holes in his body. Think the shot in the head and the one in the heart would have produced death. Knew Boss; saw him first in 1866. Defendants all identified. Have known Wm. Spencer from my boyhood. I heard  Wm. Boss say that John Bass Jones had made some remarkable threats against us blank Republicans that lived on Jones Creek; that he, Boss, had played off on Jones as a Democrat, and Jones had told him that he would go down to Arkansas and get a company of bushwhackers, and clean out all union men on Jones Creek. About the week after this conversation–Boss belonged to a society we had down there for mutual protection against thieves–we had a meeting, and Boss was there. I was chairman, and Boss said something about Jones. I don’t know who was vice president. ??? to Boss we were not attending to ??? Joneses then. Mr. Smith and Mr. Samuels made use of some abrupt language, and I got up and left.

Question: Did not Wm. Boss make a motion while you was setting–make a motion at that meeting–some time in March or April that John Bass Jones should be killed. Excluded.

Don’t know whether Boss said anything more. Samuels and Smith said something about running Jones out of county and killing him, etc.

There seemed to be considerable animosity against someone; don’t know who it was against. I told Boss that I would see Jones about it and he said nothing. Don’t know who took the chair when I left. Don’t think there was any motion or proposition to kill Jones that night. All that I know about it, I have stated. There was considerable excitement. I don’t know whether Collins or Greer was there or not. Don’t think there was a motion or even a proposition for a motion to run John Bass Jones out of the county, or to kill him. We had another meeting about two weeks after that. We organized in April, 1866. We had a meeting on the night of the 16th of April, 1867; lasted until after 9 o’clock; it was at the school house about one-half mile from my house. Wm. Spencer was there; don’t think David Collins was there, or James Greer; heard someone speak; thought it was Boss; it was at the door; I was in the back of the house; don’t know whether it was Boss’ voice or not; after the conversation had passed, heard a horse going up the hill.

Cross-Examined:

Our society was called the Union League; about one hundred members. We let everybody in who wanted to join. The organization was not to do anybody any harm, but to protect our property. Boss asked me whether John Bass Jones had not better be arrested. The business we wanted attended to was to petition the Legislature to remit interest on some older debts for which I was security. Think this is why I left the chair. I know Nathan Smith and Lee Burlingame.

Did you not say in presence of Mr. Burlingame and Smith that you heard Jones’ name mentioned in the Union League?

No.

Did you not state in presence of Thos. Wakefield yesterday that Bass was not at the meeting and that he did not ride up to the door?

I held the inquest over the body of Jones. I was J. P. at the time.

Boss’ wife was sick at that time; he came after medicine on the 16th of April, 1867. William Spencer’s wife was sick also.

Mrs. Ady and Mrs. William Hood were witnesses at the inquest. I knew all about this matter then that I know now. Mrs. Hood was a sister of John Bass Jones; Amos Buchannan’s wife and John Bass Jones’ wife were brother and sister; also Mrs. Hood and John Bass Jones.

(still for the prosecution)

J. HAMRY

I reside in Cherokee county, Kansas since 1874. Know Dr. Moss, know Wm. Spencer, knew them first in the summer of 1867. I joined the organization in 1867 after the killing. Know Wm. Boss and David Collins. I attended two meetings in July or August, 1866; we took an oath that did not amount to much; we signed a constitution for mutual protection.

Spencer told me during august, 1879, on Dave Spence’s [Note: William David Spence–my second great-grandfather]] fence. I was talking about the killing of this man. He said, “Are you a member. I can tell you.” He said, “We had a meeting. Dr. Moss was president, and would not put the motion to kill Jones; and after the crowd had gone out of doors, some one came up, and he, Spencer, said as Moss would not give the order to kill Jones, that he, Spencer, would have your men ready; I say as vice-president, to go on and do it. I don’t know who it was that Spencer said asked for the order.

Cross-Examined:

I first came to the country in June, 1867. Soon after joining the league; I was a Democrat at that time, but they did not know it. I recollect of seeing Smith, Gibbens and Dr. Moss at the meetings. I told the conversation I had with Spencer; to Laz Spence and Dave Spence and all over the country. They met at Moss’ spring; when I met with them. I wrote the conversation down a few days after. Bro. Boss, Mr. Buchanan, Nathan Smith, and Mr. Boss asked me who had told me, I said I would not tell. I did not deny knowing anything about it when they came to see me.

Re-examined:

Some of the men came armed; some one says Boss was the spokesman, and wanted my authority, but I told them I would permit my right arm to be cut off  first.

ELIZABETH ADY

I was living on Jones’ Creek in 1867, about one mile from Wm. Hood’s; knew James Greer, David Collins and Wm. Boss; had known them but a short time. Knew John Bass Jones; saw him last on the 16th day of April, 1867; come a foot from the direction of Wm. Hood’s. Think Dan Jones went to bed first; can’t say what time the men-folks retired that night. The beds were in the south end of the house–one in the west and the other in the east corner. The first thing I heard was a rapping on the house. I spoke to my husband, who spoke, and asked what they wanted; they said we want you to come out. I did not want him to go out. They said if you come out and act like a man you shall not be hurt. He opened the door; they asked who was there, and he said John Bass and J. H. Jones. John Bass went to the door. They said we want  you to go to town; he said he had no horse; they said we will furnish you one. He put his clothes on and went out and they surrounded him. I heard him say that if he had ever done anything to be killed for he would not care. They started off with him and I soon heard what I supposed to be fifteen or twenty shots; afterwards I thought I heard horses going east and south. Wm. Buchannan was standing at the door. I recognized Nathan Boss, Wm. Boss, James Greer and David Collins; David Collins at that time wore his mustache blacked. They had small arms in their hands.

Cross-Examined:

Hood’s wife was a cousin to John Bass Jones. I married Davy Jones in 1860; it was about two weeks after John Bass Jones came back before he was killed. He went to Arkansas. John Bass Jones did not make his home anywhere after he came back. I had got asleep before I was aroused by the men. John B. Jones had a great many relatives in the neighborhood. He went out the west door. I was getting out the side of the bed; and saw Wm Buchannan through the window; I had my dress on when I went to the door; I saw seven men in all; don’t know who the others were; can’t give any description of them; can’t tell how the men were dressed. I was present at the inquest next day, and swore that I did not know any of the men.

Question: Did you not tell Mrs. Furggason that you did not know any of the men that killed Jones?

Answer: No.

Ques. Did you not tell Ruban Dall the same thing?

Ans. No.

Ques. Did you not tell Mrs. Southerland the same thing?

Ans. No.

The first time I told any body who the men were was last fall; I told Pike, who was at that time detective and deputy sheriff. After Jones was killed my husband died, I married Spencer; after I parted with Spencer I went to Galena in 1877, and went by the name of Jones, though my name was Spencer. I lived on Red Hot Street, Galena. When I lived in Galena I married A. J. Ady; I went to Elk county, Kansas, from Galena. I saw David Collins at our house; he was with his brother who was hung near Lamar. Pike was at my house when I first told him this. He spoke to me several times about making the affidavit.

Did you not refuse to sign the affidavit against these men when you went to Squire Brown’s office, and did not Pike take you in a private room and talk with you before you would sign it.

Objected to and objection sustained.

I said I was afraid to tell, but no one threatened me. I don’t know why I was not afraid to tell Pike.

J. ROBERTSON

Know defendants; live eight miles southeast of here, two and one-half miles from Jones Creek; came there in April, 1866; Greer and Collins pointed out to me day before yesterday; never saw Greer before; saw Collins once before; didn’t know Jones; two days after killing heard of it in town. I was not acquainted with any of the defendants but Spencer; did not get acquainted with Boss till 1870. I met Spencer some time in 1867 or 1868 on the prairie, and we had a conversation in relation to my membership in a certain organization. He wanted to know whether I was loyal. I told him I was loyal  to the United States, but not to the organization. All the conversation was about my allegiance to the organization. It was called the Advanced Guards of America, and held their meetings at the Moss School House. Don’t know whether Spencer was a member or not.

Cross-Examined:

I belonged to that organization. I did not know any member in the order.

J. HAMRY RECALLED

Mr. Spencer said Jones was killed because he was kicking about the cutting of  timber on his land; that he did not allow rebs to come back and make threats.

WILLIAM HOOD

I resided on Jones’ Creek in April 1867; lived there until the 16th of April; knew John Bass Jones; he left that county in April, 1866; the next I saw him was March, 1867; stayed a week and went to Arkansas to see his brothers, and come back April 16th, 1867, about three o’clock that day was on horse back; stayed till dark; left his horse and went I don’t know where. His horse was in my lot; know Boss, Collins and Greer; saw Collins and Greer pass my house that evening; they passed close to where the horse was; Jones had left before they came back. I saw two persons going toward J. D. Jones’; after that I heard the dogs bark and got up and went to the door; some one knocked at the door. I opened the door; saw pistols cocked. They said “Come out.” I did; three men went in and one guarded me; the men that asked me to come out and turned and asked me who was in the house. They went in, searched the house, came out and went away. They then came back and asked me where John Bass Jones was. My wife said they had gone down to John Davy Jones’s. They turned and walked off; I went back in; they came back again, called me out and asked me to come round the house; saw four men; was getting over the fence, and Collins came up to me and asked me whether I had ever ordered any Union men out of this county or took Union men’s property. I said no. He then said he did not want me to run around any more; that is, unnecessary running around. My wife came to the door, and he then told me not to leave the house until daylight. I only recognized Greer, Collins and Buchannan.

They had been gone about one-half hour. I heard pistols a little while after I heard horses’ feet on the road going south; thought the pistol shots were down the creek. the men were not disguised; they had pistols; did not see Collins have any pistols. I saw seven men in all; only recognized three. The two men that were with Collins when he talked to me I did not know. The moon was a little west that night.

Cross Examined;

Live in Texas; northwest Texas; I left Texas last Monday week to come here; was here last court; stayed at Pike’s house and McBride’s house–went out some and mostly after night. Mr. McAntyre sent me money to come here–was in Weatherford, Texas, when I got the money. John B. Jones was riding on a black or brown horse when he came to my house. Got to my house on the 16th, about three o’clock. The men came to my house at about 12 o’clock or after, at night. I went to Jones’ next morning and stayed until night. It is one mile from my house to Boss’. I did not go to Boss’ next morning and tell them that Jones was dead. I did not tell Boss ??? that I did not know the men  that were there that night.

Witnesses for Defense

W. STEWART

Lived on Jones Creek on Laz Spence’s place in 1867; was one of the jurors before the inquest. Wm. Hood was sworn as a witness.

Question: Did not Mr. Hood swear before the Coroner’s jury that he did not know who the men were that was at his house?

Answer: Yes

Ques: Did not Hood swear before said jury that the men were all strangers to him?

Ans: yes.

LAZERUS [SIC] SPENCE

I was one of the Coroner’s jury that held the inquest over the body of John Bass Jones. Wm. Hood was sworn as a witness, and testified that the men who were at his house that night were all strangers to him.

Have known William Spencer since 1841; Mr. Spencer always had a good reputation; also Boss and Greer.

Cross Examined: There was a large crowd at the inquest.

I was at the meeting of the League the night Jones was killed. Collins or Greer was there.

The League lasted till two minutes after nine o’clock; after the meeting was over, myself, Dr. Moss and William Spencer went home together as far as Moss’, then I went a short distance from Moss’ and Spencer went on home.

NATHAN SMITH

I lived in 1866 at my father’s on Jones Creek; I remember of the killing of J. B. Jones. I was north of Hood’s or John D. Jones that night. I was at my uncle’s that night shelling corn. I was a member of the League. I understood it to be a general organization gotten up by members of the local area to protect property and enforce the law. I was at the meeting of the League at Moss Spring, when Major Baney was an applicant and he was rejected. He never was a member of that order.

Cross Examined: My uncle lived about two and a half miles from where John B. Jones was killed. I never heard the name of Jones mentioned in the League and I know it was not the murder of Jones that caused the League to disband. I never was at Major Baney’s for the purpose of driving him out of the county.

Re-examined: I was at the foot of the stairs when Moss said he had never heard the name of Jones mentioned in the league and had never heard any motion or proposition in the League to kill Jones or run him out of the  country.

D. BURLINGAME:

Testified as above

A. WAKEFIELD

Yesterday and the day before, D. Moss told me he was not at the meeting of the League the night Jones was killed. Swears to the good character of all of the defendants. Baney never was a member of the League. His name was rejected at a meeting at Moss Spring, while I was a member.

NATHAN SMITH

My recollection is that I said I could not positively tell where I was the night Jones was killed, at the time I gave bail.

MRS. SOUTHERLAND

Know Mrs. Ady, her and her husband were at my house last harvest, and she, Mrs. Ady, told me she did not know who killed J. B. Jones; that she did not recognize any of them and that the killing of Jones was a mystery.

Cross-Examined: She said that three of the men came in the house and she did not recognize any of them; that they were strangers and not disguised.

CHRISTIAN FINGERLY

I came to this county on the 1st of March, 1867; know Mrs. Ady. The morning of the 17th I went to Jones’ house and helped to carry the body in the home and Mrs. Ady told me she did not know any of the men that killed Jones.

RUBEN DALL

Know Mrs. Ady; knew her in 1869, in the summer of 1869. Mrs. Ady said in my presence that she did not recognize any of the men who killed Bass Jones. She said the men were out in the yard southwest of the house under an apple  tree. Know where Boss lived in 1868; there was no lane on the northwest of Boss’ house at that time.

SOLOMON GOUCHER

Came to this state in the fall of 1867; know where Boss live; am acquainted with the country. The lane Mitchell spoke of was built in the spring of 1869.

MRS. FERGUSSON

Am a sister of defendant Collins; know Mrs. Ady; she and her husband were at my house visiting, and Mrs. Ady said she did not know the men that killed Jones; that they were black and strangers; I was living at home, and my brother was at home the night Jones was killed; also James Greer was there, and my brother was sick. I know it was that night because my sister was confined. My brother and Greer slept upstairs; the stairs were in the room where we slept. My brother and Mr. Greer went to bed early, and did not come down during the night.

Cross Examined: I have been married seven years; think I was about sixteen or seventeen; think I was older at that time. James Greer stayed at our house lots of nights. The night Jones was killed I think they went to bed at the proper time. My brother and Mr. Greer went to bed first.

MRS. STENSON

Am a sister of defendant Collins; lived in Newton County in 1867; I remember the night Jones was killed; my brother was at home that night; Greer was there; I slept in the room where the stairs went up and my brother and Greer went upstairs to bed that night. I went to my sister’s next day to see my sister, and Mrs. Ward told me Jones was killed. My sister had been confined.

S. COLLINS

Am one of the defendants; was at home the night John Bass Jones was killed; Greer slept with me. My sister told Greer that Jones was killed. I was not at J. D. Jones’ the night Jones was killed; was not at Hood’s that night. I  was at home, sick.

WILLIAM SPENCER

Am one of the defendants; am sixty-one; knew Jones. The night Jones was killed I went to Dr. Moss’ for medicine and went to the meeting, and went home about nine o’clock. I was a member of the Union League; had nothing to do with the killing of Jones; never gave orders to kill him and never heard his name mentioned in the League; never told Baney what he swore to.

JAMES GREER

Am one of the defendants; was not at Wm. Hood’s the night Jones was killed; did not go to John D. Jones’ the night he was killed; did not help kill him, and don’t know anything about it.

WILLIAM BOSS

Am one of the defendants; knew John Jones; first found out he was killed on the morning of the 17th of April, 1867. Wm. Hood came to my house that morning and told me that Jones was killed. I was at home all night the night Jones was killed. I never suggested to the League to kill Jones, and never said anything about him. My wife was sick the night Jones was killed. John Bass Jones and I was always friendly; never saw him but twice in his life time, once when Buchanan introduced him to me, and once when he came to measure his mother’s corn.

Cross Examined: Never had any such conversation with Mitchell, as he has sworn to. I did not see Mitchell all the day before Jones was killed.

MRS. BOSS

Am the wife of Wm. Boss. I recollect of the killing of John Bass Jones. My husband was at home that night. I recollect my husband was at home, because I was sick and he gave me medicine, and Wm. Hood came over next morning and told us Jones was killed.

Cross Examined: I had been sick for nearly one year.

PHILLIP BOSS

Am a son of the defendant Boss. Am twenty-nine years old in August. I recollect of the time John Bass Jones was killed: The next morning after he was killed, Wm. Hood came to our house and told us Jones was killed. My father was at home all of the night Jones was killed. I know he was because my mother was sick, and father was up and down during the night to give her medicine, and Wm. Hood came over the next morning and told us of the killing of Jones.

Cross Examined: Hood told us that morning that he had no idea who killed Jones. My father asked him if he wanted anyone to go and help hunt the ones that killed John Bass Jones. Mrs. Allen was living in the room adjoining us, and Mrs. Seanures was living in the kitchen.

HIRAM BOSS

Am twenty four, February 26. Am a son of Wm. Boss. I recollect of hearing of the killing of John Bass Jones. Wm. Hood told us the next morning that John Bass Jones was killed; he also said that he did not know who killed him, and had no idea who killed him. I recollect my father was at home all the  night of the 16ths.

REBUTTAL OF STATE

STEPHEN HOOD

I live about six miles from Moss, and the same from W. Hood. In 1867 I lived on the head of Jenkins Creek about three miles from Wm. Hood.

Question: Was Major Baney a member of that order in 1867.

Objected to by the defendant. Over ruled.

Ans. I think he was

Cross-Examined. I think I have been to meetings when Baney was there, am not satisfied or positive; was not a member of the League at Moss Spring.

JOHN ONSTOTT

Quest: Was you agent for the farm Boss lived on in 1867?

Ans. I was.

Ques. Did you give Boss any authority to sell any timber?

Ans. I did not.

Objected to by the State. Overruled.

DANIEL JONES

I was present at the coroner’s inquest; don’t recollect whether Wm. Hood testified or not at the inquest.

JACOB GILL

Live in Newton county; know Wm. Hood. I recollect the circumstances of Jones being killed. Hood left the day Jones was buried. I saw Hood start; the evening he left, he was at my house. I was present at the Coroner’s Inquest. Didn’t hear Wm. Hood testify; I think Mrs. Jones and husband were all that testified.

Cross-Examined; If Noah Moon testified, I did not know it.

M. BUCKINGHAM

I lived three-fourth miles west from where Jones was killed; was at the inquest. Hood left the day Jones was buried.

Cross-Examined: I think John D. Jones and wife and Wm. Hood and wife testified at the Coroner’s inquest.

JUDGE HOWELL

Live in Joplin. Know W. S. Norton; he lives in Empire City, Kansas. He formerly lived in Joplin. Knew his general moral character. It was bad.

JAMES H. JONES

I was present at the Coroner’s inquest. Could not say whether Wm. Hood was sworn or not.

 

***

The newspaper account ends here. I did not find any additional articles about the murder trial. The case was referred to once again in the press when William Spencer died December 23, 1888, and his obituary mentioned that he had been one of the defendants in the case. As far as I know, the defendants were all acquitted by the jury and the case against the defendants was closed. The real killers of John Bass Jones were never found.

My interest in the case has not waned however. And recently, while going through the old newspaper account, I made an interesting discovery that has taken me in a new direction. I will cover that in Part Two.

References

“The So-Called Murder Case” from The Carthage Banner, August 1, 1880. Microfilm. Jasper County Public Library, Carthage, Missouri.

 

 

 

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Eight: The Family of John Bass Jones (1838-1867)

John Jones (1794-1843)--Photo taken at the Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri, May 2001

John Jones (1794-1843)–Photo taken at the Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri, May 2001

Permilia/Parmelia "Milly" Greer Jones (1795-1875). Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri.

Permilia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer Jones (1795-1875). Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri.

So–who was John Bass Jones?

A connecting link to many individuals portrayed in this series, John Bass Jones suddenly emerges on the scene and captures everyone’s attention. He stands at the crossroads of a number of connections. And because of his surname “Jones”, I feel as though I need to introduce him here and then place him aside until I arrive at the story of his murder two years after the Civil War. I think he would like that. He was a scoundrel, a rascal, a varmint, a “twerp” and a host of other names. So it is time to introduce him here in order to show how his family weaves in and out of the other family groups.

The youngest son of John Jones (1794-1843) and Parmelia/Permilia “Melly” Greer, John Bass Jones was born in Sarcoxie, Newton County, Missouri March 10, 1838, and he died in a hail of bullets April 16, 1867 in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri. He came from a good family. His parents were among the earliest settlers in Jasper County, and his father’s name is on the Moss Springs Pioneer Monument.

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

This Jones family history is sketchy. For years, people have recorded the wrong information about them. I bought into that information until I started digging into the records because I wasn’t satisfied with the information I had. There seemed to be no connection between John Bass Jones’ father and the people purported to be siblings. The information I present here is what I have to date. And the first problem centers around a tombstone inscription: John Jones’ tombstone–the father of John Bass Jones.

John Jones Tombstone.

John Jones Tombstone.

The Father of John Bass Jones: John Jones (1794-1843)

According to the inscription on John Jones’ tombstone, he died October 3, 1843 in Jasper County, Missouri at the age of “43 yrs 4 mo 14 d”(1). Based upon this inscription, people have placed his date of birth as May 30, 1800. However, a problem arises with this interpretation. According to a copy of the original marriage record, John Jones and “Milly” Greer were married September 30, 1813 in Davidson County, Tennessee(2). Melly would have been 16 to 18 years of age, but John would have been 13. In all likelihood, the tombstone carver made a mistake and the “43” should have been “49”, making John’s year of birth 1794 and not 1800! The rest of the problem with his date of birth centers around calculations. Four months from October places the birth month as June. 14 days from October 3 places the date of birth as the 20th. John’s date of birth was June 20, 1794. What follows was a huge surprise.

I always considered it strange that John Jones and his son John Bass Jones were buried in the same plot or area of the Moss Springs Cemetery with the Lewis Jones family. It is true that the two families intermarried, so I thought they were buried there for that reason. Then came a real shocker. They were buried there because they were family! John Jones (1794-1843) was a brother of Lewis Jones (1795-1849)–the husband of Milly Catherine Spence–and James B. Jones (1797-1870)–the husband of Charlotte T. Greer. John Jones was the oldest surviving son of Daniel Jones (1767-1815) and Sarah “Sallie” Basset (1769-1837). So there is no separate third line of Joneses! Furthermore, this John Jones was the John Jones appointed as administrator of David Spence’s estate in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1815(3) John Jones filed an inventory in David Spence’s Estate in November 1817 (4). As noted in an earlier section in the William Spence series, David Spence was a younger half-brother of Elisha Spence (1776-1835), and was the son of David Spence (1735-1790) and Elisha Spence’s mother Judha Perry (1748-1795). David Spence died in camp while serving in the War of 1812!

The Daniel Jones family is set out in Part Seven of this series. However, since I just made my discovery about John Jones’ relationship with Daniel and Sallie, I’ll provide a brief outline here with the emphasis on John. The children of Daniel Jones and Sarah “Sallie” Basset were:

1. John Jones (1788-1794). No additional information. He was the first-born and he died young–the reason why I could find no additional information about him. Had he lived, he would have moved to Missouri with his brothers! He is not John Jones (1794-1843), who is buried in Moss Springs Cemetery!

2. Ollie Basset Jones (1789-1873). Her family is set out in Part Seven. She and her husband Samuel Smith settled in Fernvale, Williamson County, Tennessee.

3. John Jones (1794-1843)–the subject under discussion here. John was born June 20, 1794 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died October 3, 1843 in Sarcoxie, Newton, Missouri. His tombstone is the oldest in the Moss Springs Cemetery, and he is buried in the Jones plot. On September 30, 1813, John married Permelia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer (1795-1875) in Davidson County, Tennessee(5). (A full discussion of Melly Greer appears in the following section.) Their children are listed below. I have already talked about some of them in Part Seven, but I have some updates to note:

a. Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859). Daniel was born in Davidson County, Tennessee and he died in 1859 in Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas. Apparently, he was making plans to move his family there. I originally thought his middle name was associated with a specific family member. His middle name stood for Andrew Jackson. These people were Jacksonian Democrats. His first name would have been for his grandfather, Daniel Jones. Daniel married his first cousin, Rebecca Jones (1820-1867). Rebecca was the daughter of his uncle and aunt, Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence. Their children are discussed in Part Seven, but I will relist them here: (i) James H. Jones (1844-1920)–his wife was Rosa “Rosie” McKelby (1850-1920); (ii) John Lewis Jones (1846-1929)–his wife was Henrietta Andrus (1856-1945); (iii) George Washington Jones (1848-1887)–his wife was Amanda Elizabeth Murphy (1853-1935); (iv) Daniel Greenberry Jones (1851-1924)–his wife was Mary Margaret “Martha” Hicks (1856-1900). [I now understand the origin of the name “Greenberry.” Melly Greer’s father’s name was Greenberry (Green Berry) Greer!]

b. James Greenberry Jones (1824-1884). James was born December 19, 1824 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died January 1, 1884 in Lincoln, Atchison, Missouri. His wife was Susan Jane Hammer (1825-1904), the daughter of Jacob Hammer (1793-1855) and Mary Polly Onstott (1793-1870)–another pioneer family of Jasper/Newton Counties. Their children were: (i) Sarah E. Jones (b. 1844); (ii) John David Jones (1847-1880); (iii) Joseph Greenberry Jones (1849-1933); (iv) George T. Jones (b. 1851); (v) Martha J. Jones (1854-1928); (vi) Mary Adaline Jones (1856-1934); (vii) Bluford Jacob Jones (1858-1917); (viii) Warren P. Jones (1860-1926); (ix) James Price Jones (1863-1933).

c. Joseph Lewis Jones (1827-1880). Joseph was born in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died in Benton County, Arkansas. His first wife was Nancy Thompson Hazelwood (1829-1860). Their children were: (i) John Cass Jones (1849-1920); (ii) Greenberry “Green Berry” Jones (1852-1936); (iii) Mary M. Jones (b. 1854); (iv) Martha Jones (1856-1880); (v) William Craig Jones (1861-1935). His second wife was Elizabeth (maiden name unknown) (1845-1874). Their children were: (i) Amanda Jones, born 1865; (ii) Margaret Jones, born 1869; (iii) James R. Jones, born 1871; (iv) Wilson R. Jones, born 1872; (v) Sarah A. Jones, born 1874.

d. Nancy Frances Tennessee Jones (1828-1890). I talked about Nancy in Part Seven, but I did not talk about her first marriage. So I’ll do that here. Nancy was born November 23, 1828 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died November 18, 1890 in Village Creek, Johnson, Texas. Her first husband was Harrison Hammer (1822-1862)–a son of Jacob and Mary Onstott Hammer, and a brother of Susan Jane Hammer who married James Greenberry Jones. (While I am thinking about it, I should mention that the majority of the John Jones/Melly Greer family supported the South during the Civil War.) Harrison Hammer died about 1862 during Civil War Service. He served with the 5th Missouri Cavalry, Company E (Confederate)(6). After his death, Nancy lived on a farm near Sarcoxie with her mother and her children. The 1860 Census for Nancy T. Hammer lists the following people:

Nancy T. Hammer (age 32)
Jarvis J. Hammer (age 11)
John J. Hammer (age 7)
Corilla Hammer (age 4)
George B. Hammer (age 2)
Permelia J. Hammer (age 65)
Daniel J. Hammer (age 8)(7).

I’m not sure whether Daniel is Nancy’s son, or whether he is a member of another Hammer family. Permelia J. Hammer is Nancy’s mother, Melly Greer Jones. I have not found a marriage record for her with a Hammer. This may have been a census taker’s error in assuming that everyone in the household was a Hammer.

After her husband’s death, Nancy married her first cousin’s husband, Capt. William Newton Warren (1829-1883). Her first cousin was Sarah Zane Jones (1823-1862), a daughter of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence. The story of her flight to Texas when the Union Army entered Missouri is told in Part Seven. Her mother, Melly Greer Jones, remained in Missouri. The children of Capt. William Newton Warren and Nancy Tennessee Jones follow: (i) Amelia Warren, born 1863; (ii) Gustavos Ericson Warren (1866-1947); and (iii) Effie Warren (1868-1936).

e. Margaret Martha Ann Jones (1834-1918). Margaret was born in January 1834 in Sarcoxie, Newton, Missouri, and she died December 25, 1918 in Oneta, Wagner, Oklahoma. Her husband was George Washington Hammer (1829-1875)–another son of Jacob and Mary Onstott Hammer, and a brother of Harrison and Susan Jane. Their children were: (i) Permelia J. Hammer (1851-1880); (ii) James Emery Hammer (1853-1925); (iii) Francis Marion Hammer (1856-1901); (iv) Hezekiah Houston Hammer (1858-1913); (v) Sterling Richard Hammer (1861-1929); (vi) John B. Hammer (1863-1929); (vii) Mary T. Hammer (1866-1891); (viii) William Dudley Hammer (1868-1947); (ix) Joseph T. Hammer (1871-1885); and (x) Jesse Wade Hammer (1875-1969). An Elias Reece Porter (1850-1901) is listed with this family. I’m not sure who he is–whether he is an orphan who was being raised by the family, or whether he was a relative who was living with them.

f. John Bass Jones (1838-1867). John gets his own special section below.

Permelia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer (1797-1875): The Mother of John Bass Jones

Permelia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1797, and she died in Jasper County, Missouri November 30, 1875. Her parents were Greenberry (Green Berry) Greer (1764-1842) and Charlotte DeMoss (1767-1849). The children of Greenberry Greer and Charlotte DeMoss follow:

1. Nancy Greer (1785-1842). Nancy was born in Franklin County, Virginia in 1785, and she died after 1842 in Davidson County, Tennessee. Her first husband was John Lamb Goodwin (1775-1824), whom she married in Davidson County, Tennessee April 24, 1809(8). They had six children, whose names are unknown. Her second husband was Jacob Tennison (born 1789.) Nothing else is known.

2. Isaac D. Greer (1788-1860). Isaac was born in 1788 in Bedford County, Virginia, and he died in 1860 in Davidson County, Tennessee. Isaac also has two marriages. His first wife was Tabitha Goodwin (1789-1829), whom he married March 18, 1808 in Davidson County, Tennessee(9). They had two children: (a) Henry E. Greer (1811-1882). Henry was born in 1811 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died in 1882 in District 8, Perry County, Tennessee. His first wife was Harriet P. Henry (1819-1859), whom he married in Davidson County December 6, 1834(10). Their children were (i) Thomas Greer, born 1836; (ii) Joseph A. Greer (1837-1909); (iii) Margaret Greer (1839-1884). His second wife was Cordelia Cain (b. 1840). Their children were: (i) Mary Izora Greer (1863-1896; (ii) Martha A. Greer (1865-1928); and Sarah C. Greer, born 1868. (b) Charlotte Greer (1816-1879). Charlotte was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1816, and she died March 22, 1879 in Humphreys County, Tennessee. On November 4, 1830, she married William McIllwain (1808-1870) in Davidson County, Tennessee)(11). Their children were: (i) Mary Elizabeth McIllwain (1834-1876); and (ii) Henry Martin McIllwain (1837-1913). Isaac’s second wife was Margaret “Peggy” Richardson (1791-1872), whom he married July 25, 1831 in Davidson County, Tennessee(12).

3. Susannah Louzania Luzany Greer (1793-1875). Luzany Greer was born November 8, 1793 in Bedford County, Virginia, and she died September 28, 1875 in Paris, Henry, Tennessee. On February 8, 1812, Luzany married William D. Dillahunty (1793-1838) in Davidson County, Tennessee(13). William was the son of Dillahunty, Jr. and Rachel Koonce (1758-1826), and a grandson of the Rev. John Dilahunty, Sr. (1728-1816) and Hannah Neal (1732-1816). The Rev. John was born in Havre de Grace, Maryland, and he died at Belle Meade, Davidson County, Tennessee. The Rev. John was instrumental in establishing the Baptist faith in Davidson County. The Dillahunty family left Maryland for North Carolina, where John Jr. was born in Dobbs County. And from there they went to Davidson County, Tennessee.

The children of Luzany Greer and John Dilahunty, Jr. follow: (a) James D. Dillahunty (1813-1893); (b) John G. Dillahunty (1815-1880); (c) Elizabeth “Betsey” Dillahunty (1816-1891); (d) William Louis Dillahunty (1818-1876) (e) Greenberry D. Dillahunty (1820-1891); (f) Charlotte Marinda Dillahunty (1821-1903); (g) Francis Marion “Locke” Dillahunty (1823-1910); (h) Joseph Henry Dillahunty (1826-1897); (i) Oliver Cromwell Dillahunty (1823-1852); (j) Helen Rachel Dilahunty (1830-1882); (k) Martha Luzany Dilahunty (1832-1858). Martha was born December 15, 1832 in Henry County, Tennessee, and she died September 9, 1858 in Mineral Wells, Palo Pinto, Texas. Her husband was John Dillard Love (1822-1889). They had one daughter named Mary Willy Zane Love (1852-1823);(l) Tabitha Dillahunty (1834-1835). Tabitha was born November 30, 1834 in Henry County, Tennessee.

4. Tabitha Greer (1794-1850). Tabitha was born in Davidson County Tennessee in 1794, and she died in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1850. Her husband was Houston Cooper (1790-1860). I know nothing more about them.

5. Permelia/Parmelia “Melly” Greer (1795-1875)–John Bass Jones’ mother. Under discussion here.

6. Mahulda/Huldah Greer (1804-bef. 1860). Huldah was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1804, and she died before 1860 in Cheatham County, Tennessee. Her husband was Benjamin Franklin Hannah (1800-1860). Their children were: (a) Louisa Hannah (1824-1880); (b) Joseph Henry Hannah (1832-1904); (c) James Hannah (born 1832); (d) George Woodward or Woodard H. Hannah (1840-1900); (e) Benjamin Franklin Hannah, Jr (1843-1930).

7. James Lowe Greer (1806-1869). James was born in Davidson County, Tennessee November 25, 1806, and he died August 5, 1869 in Davidson County. His first wife was Hannah Dillahunty (1806-1849). Hannah was a daughter of Silas Dillahunty (1780-1829) and Sarah “Sallie” DeMoss (1783-1829). Sallie DeMoss was daughter of James DeMoss (1758-1813) and Luzany Taylor (1764-1786). James DeMoss was a brother of Charlotte DeMoss, James Lowe Greer’s mother. On the Dillahunty side, Silas Dillahunty was a son of John Dillahunty, Jr. and Rachel Koonce, and a brother of William D. Dillahunty, who married James Lowe Greer’s sister, Luzaney Greer! The children of James Lowe Greer and Hannah Dillahunty were: (a) Green Berry (Greenberry) Greer (1835-1855); (b) Joseph Silas Greer (1838-1921); (c) John Taylor Greer (b. 1843); (d) James Lowe Greer, Jr. (1848-1910). James Lowe Greer’s second wife was Louzanie P. “Zaney” DeMoss (1821-1900). Zaney was the daughter of Thomas Washington DeMoss (1789-1863) and Elizabeth “Betsy” Shelton (1799-1850). Thomas was the son of Abraham Louis DeMoss (1753-1820) and Hannah Greer (1755-1839). Hannah was the daughter of John G. Greer (1714-1782) and Nancy Ann “Nancy” Walker (1716-1804). The story takes an interesting turn here.

Hannah Greer (daughter of John and Nancy) had a brother named Joseph Greer (1767-1834). This Joseph Greer was born in Bedford County, Virginia in 1767, and he died in Franklin County, Virginia in 1834. His wife was Frances “Fanny” Lyon (1768-1830). Their children were: (a) John Greer (1796-1857); (b) Lucy Greer (1801-1838); (c) Charlotte T. Greer (1803-1877); (d) Peter B. Greer (1808-1875). My interest here is on Charlotte T. Greer. Charlotte was born in Tennessee in 1803 and she died February 22, 1877 in Newton County, Missouri. On September 8, 1821, Charlotte married James B. Jones (1797-1870)–a younger brother of Lewis Jones (1795-1849) and John Jones (1794-1843(14). Lewis was the husband of Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875)–the oldest daughter of Elisha Spence (1776-1835) and Susannah Spencer (1785-1810). John was the older brother of Lewis and James B., whose wife was Melly Greer. So this is another connection between the two Jones families. James B. Jones and Charlotte T. Greer had two children: (a) Rachel Emeline Jones (1824-1861); and (b) George Jones (1831-1850). Now for another interesting twist to the story–this one centering upon Rachel Emiline Jones!

Rachel Emeline Jones was born February 20, 1824 in Tennessee and she died June 1, 1861 in Newton County, Missouri. About 1840, Rachel Emeline Jones married Madison Shelby Greer (1820-1908) in Newton County, Missouri. Madison Shelby Greer was born January 13, 1820 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died March 5, 1908 in Diamond, Newton County, Missouri. (My grandfather, William Franklin Spence (1884-1973), was born in Diamond!) Madison Shelby Greer was the son of Moses Greer (1795-1860) and Catherine Pollard (1795-1856), and grandson of a Moses C. Greer, Jr. (1768-1848) and Susannah Wood (1776-1848). Moses C. Greer was the son of Moses Greer, Sr., who was born June 2, 1744 at Gunpowder River, Baltimore, Maryland, and who died May 10, 1834 in Franklin County, Virginia and Mary Ann Fitch (1716-1786). And Moses, Sr was the son of John Greer, Sr. (1688-1752) and Sarah Day (1686-1746). Three children of interest are found in the John Greer, Sr.-Sarah Day generation which connect some of these links: William Greer, Sr. (1710-1785)–ancestor of Madison Shelby Greer–husband of Rachel Emeline Jones–daughter of James B. Jones and Charlotte T. Greer; John G. Greer, Jr. (1714-1782)–ancestor of Charlotte T. Greer–wife of James B. Jones and mother of Rachel Emeline Jones; and Joseph Greer (1727-1781)–the father of Greenberry (Green Berry) Greer (1764-1842) and grandfather of John Bass Jones (1838-1867)! [The point is, all the Greers and DeMosses and the Joneses portrayed in this narrative are related!]

Now–where was I?

8. Joseph H. Greer (1810-1835). Joseph was born December 23, 1810 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died August 22, 1835 in Davidson County. I have no information additional information about him.

There is a Green Berry Greer Cemetery in Davidson County, Tennessee where many members of the Greer family are buried(15). Likewise, the Dillahuntys had a Dillahunty Family Cemetery in Henry County, Tennessee(16). Those graves are all posted on Find-a-Grave.

John Jones and Permelia Greer are both buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri.

John Bass Jones (1838-1867). Grave at Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

John Bass Jones (1838-1867). Grave at Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Photo taken May 2002.

John Bass Jones (1838-1867)

According to my Ancestry calculator, John Bass Jones is a brother-in-law of my first cousin four times removed. That relationship may possibly change after Ancestry catches up with all the changes I have made today!

John Bass Jones was born March 10, 1838 in Sarcoxie, Newton, Missouri, and he died April 16, 1867 in a hail of bullets in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri at his first cousin’s farm. That cousin was John David Jones (1827-1870), a son of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence. People called him “Bass”. Presently, I have no idea how he obtained his middle name.

John Bass Jones and his sister, Martha, were the only two children born in Missouri. They were well aware of their family’s close association with the Spence family in Tennessee and in Missouri. John was only five years old when his father died. But his mother and other family members kept him informed of these stories. In addition to Milly Catherine Spence Jones, John knew Samuel and Daniel Spence, Milly Catherine’s brothers. He sometimes accompanied his cousin, John David Jones, to the Spence farms. On one such excursion, Samuel Spence (my third great grandfather), told him how his father, John Jones, was the administrator of Samuel’s uncle’s estate. John didn’t know what an administrator or an estate was, but he listened to the story.

“What was his name–your uncle?” John asked.

“Uncle Davey–David Spence. He died in the War of 1812. That’s where John Davey here gets his name?”

There was another attraction that secured young John’s interest at the Samuel Spence farm. His name was Newton Jasper Spence (1841-1882), a younger son of Samuel and Elizabeth Inman Spence. Three years younger than John, Newt Spence had more ideas for adventure than anyone John Bass Jones had ever known. And the two would become a plague in Jasper County in the early stages of the Civil War.

John Bass Jones became engrossed in secession talk that was sweeping the region. When he was younger, he and Newton Jasper fought invisible Yankees in the cornfields. As they grew older, the pair became associated with men with a dangerous eye for trouble. And Newton County (where John Bass lived) was definitely a “Little Dixie.” John Bass Jones grew up to despise the Union men living on Jones Creek. Keeping his opinions to himself was not part of his makeup. He did a great deal of spouting off and sometimes picked himself up off the ground as a result of it!

Only two census records bear his name. The 1850 Census record for Sarcoxie Twp., Jasper, Missouri shows twelve-year old John residing in his mother’s house. The census taker identified Permelia as Phoebe Jones and gave her year of birth as 1808 (she was born in 1795). The rest of the record is fairly correct(17). John also appears on the 1860 Census for Granby, Newton County, Missouri at the age of twenty-two in the Asa Scott household(18). His occupation is listed as a miner. Granby is important to this narrative. Some known bushwhackers resided in the area, and they definitely had an influence on John. He and Newton Jasper Spence formed their own little hoodlum group. They rode through the farms in Jasper County “whooping and hurrahing” and tearing up fencing along with other property structures. Bullets flew in all directions.

Newton Jasper Spence could hardly wait until he was twenty-one to join the Confederate Army. Several of John Bass Jones’ brothers-in-law also joined the Confederate Army. John Bass Jones went to Arkansas to let things cool down in Jasper County. His mother sent him down there. A number of her family members were in the Confederate Army. She decided the Army didn’t need John! And a number of her family members living in Arkansas would keep John out of trouble. So John went to Arkansas. It is unknown how much trouble he got into. But he met his future wife while there.

When I first began this research a few years ago, I discovered the wife of John Bass Jones was a Pipkin, but I focused on the wrong one. John’s wife was from the same Pipkin family, but she was a distant cousin of the woman I originally identified. John’s wife was a Baptist; the woman I originally focused on was a member of the LDS Church. And that was another reason why Permelia chose Saline County, Arkansas relatives for John. A Henderson family founded the Baptist Church there where her relatives were members. Some of their relatives were living in Missouri with his aunt Charlotte T. Greer Jones (James B. Jones’ wife). His uncle Jim had to go away on business in 1850, so the Hendersons moved into the household, where they appear on the 1850 Census(19). John Bass Jones didn’t mind the younger three children from Arkansas: Mary Ann Henderson (age 15); James Henderson (age 12); and William Henderson (age 10). Their parents were Abner B. Henderson, who was born in 1807 in Dearborn County, Indiana, and who died in 1840 in White River, Independence County, Arkansas, and Mary Adaline Hawkins, who was born in 1816 in New Jersey and who would die in Benton County, Arkansas after 1880. But he did mind the other Henderson living there–Otey Henderson–who was seventeen years old at the time and from a completely different Henderson line. His father was Joseph R. Henderson, Jr. (1802-1868) and Agnes Nancy Minnis (1804-1883). They were from Overton County, Tennessee. Otey’s uncle, Gideon B. Henderson (1808-1857), also lived in Newton County with his wife Jane and son, Abel(20).

“I know why he’s here!” John blasted, referring to Otey. “He’s friends with that Davey K. Hood family! A bunch of damn Yankees!”

“Don’t talk like that, John!”

“Why ain’t they loyal to the South!” John thundered to his mother

“Oh, John, you know southern people who are not loyal to the south!”

John Bass Jones and Otey Henderson engaged in a few dust-ups over the matter.

By 1860, Uncle James B. Jones was home and the Hendersons returned to their respective places. Otey was the first to go and returned to his family in Carroll County, Missouri, for which John was glad. By 1863, John learned Otey was Capt. William Moses “Otis/Otey” Henderson of the Union Army(21). John had plenty comments to make about that!

So, it is just as well, Permelia decided, not to tell John about the Hendersons who founded the Baptist Church he will be attending in Saline County, Arkansas!

John’s future wife was Mary Jane Pipkin. She was born November 3, 1836 in Arkansas, and she was the daughter of Willis Stephen Pipkin (1808-1848) and Mary Couch (1812-1890). The Pipkins came from North Carolina and settled in Saline County, Arkansas by 1838. John probably met Mary Jane in church; his mother’s relatives never missed a Sunday. By the time John met Mary, she was already a widow.

The children of Willis Stephen Pipkin and Mary Couch follow:

1. Ann Pipkin, who was born in 1829. Nothing else is known.

2. Martha Nancy Pipkin (1831-1908). Martha was born August 8, 1831 in St. Clair, Alabama and she died January 8, 1903 in Saline County, Arkansas. Her husband was James Monroe Kesterson (1828-1862). Their children were: (i) Sarah Jane Kesterson (1851-1908); (ii) Wilma Emaline Kesterson (1856-1882); (iii) Samuel L. Kesterson (1857-1927).

3. Sarah Pipkin (1833-1860). Sarah born 1833 in St. Clair, Alabama, and she died in 1860 in Saline County, Arkansas. Her husband was Jerome Bonaparte Kesterson (1829-1862). Their children were: (i) Mary Catherine Kesterson (1856-1924); (ii) Willis Vincent Kesterson (1858-1901); (iii) Martha Ann Kesterson (1860-1920).

Mary Jane Pipkin McFerrin/McFerren Find-a-Grave Photo.

Mary Jane Pipkin McFerrin/McFerren Find-a-Grave Photo.

4. Mary Jane Pipkin (1836-1870)–the subject here. Mary Jane was born in Arkansas November 3, 1836 in Arkansas, and she died November 4, 1870 in Saline County, Arkansas. On June 19, 1851 when she was fourteen years old, she married John McFerrin (1832-1863)(22). John was born 1832 in Alabama, and he died before August 1863 at Okolona, Chickasaw, Mississippi. He was serving in the Confederate Army. The following is from his military records:

John McFerrin, enlisted Feb 20, 1862, Betnon, Arkansas, Colonel Crawford, 2 years, has not been paid anything, absent from muster, Dropped from muster roll by order of Colonel Colquitt, sent to hospital 5 May 1862, has not been heard from, supposed to be dead(23).

Her husband was not killed in battle; he was sick and died from his illness. As far as I can confirm from the records, they did not have any children.

5. Adeline Pipkin (1838-1903). Adeline was born September 18, 1838 in Saline County, Arkansas, and she died June 24, 1903 in Saline County, Arkansas. Her husband was Daniel Allen Cameron (1833-1896). Their children were: (i) Willis James Cameron (1857-1825); (ii) Mary Elizabeth Cameron (1860-1945); (iii) Mary Elizabeth Cameron (1860-1945); (iv) Laura Josephine Cameron (1865-1869); (v) Louise Catherine “Katie” Cameron (1870-1936); (vi) Emma Sue Cameron (1871-1977); (vii) John Littleton Cameron (1874-1934); (viii) Samuel Burns Cameron (1877-1965)

6. Catherine Pipkin (1840-1883). Catherine was born in 1840 in Saline County, Arkansas, and she died October 1883 in Saline County, Arkansas. She had five marriages. The first was February 25, 1847 to John J. Johnson. The second was July 19, 1857 to Littleton H. Johnson (1830-1862). They had one child: William L. Johnson (b. 1860). The third was to John M. Jacobs (1816-1875). Their children were: (i) Joseph C. Jacobs (1865-1891); (ii) Mary Jacobs (1869-1920); (iii) Emma Jacobs (1871-1956). The fourth was to William J. Winston Wakefield (1814-1877). They had one child: Lillie Wakefield, born 1877. The fifth was to Robert P. Ware, born 1828. Their son was Horace Jewell Ware (1882-1859).

7. William Pipkin (1842-1862). William was born April 1842 in Saline County, Arkansas, and he died in the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee on April 6, 1862.

8. James Milton Pipkin (1846-1921). James was born April 30, 1846 in Saline County, Arkansas, and he died in Little Rock, Pulaski, Arkansas on February 12, 1921. His wife was Martha “Mattie” Tennessee Crawford (1849-1942). Their son was Dr. John Willis Pipkin (1869-1914).

9. A daughter (name unknown) who was born before 1848 in Arkansas, and who died before 1854.

When John Bass Jones met his future wife at church, she was still wearing her widow’s garment. He thought she looked so young, so he had to ask his mother’s relatives about her. They told him the story–and the story intrigued him all the more. Some time passed before he actually spoke with her, and it was probably at a church ice cream social. They were married either in late 1866 or very early in 1867. Then John made a fatal mistake. He decided to return to Missouri and settle near what was left of his family. Most of them had fled to Arkansas or to Texas. His mother still lived in Missouri; he and his wife could help her on her farm.

There is something about the return of a disliked individual to a region where that person once raised a lot of Cain. John’s return to Jasper and Newton Counties sent out an alarm that rippled throughout the area. He made the claim that he would round up a group of bushwhackers in Arkansas and wipe out all the Union men living on Jones Creek! He was staying with his cousin, John David Jones, on April 16, 1867 when he was killed. Masked men arrived at the farmhouse, ordered John out in the darkness, and shot him full of holes on the road. His wife was a widow once again. The story of an 1880 murder trial concerning his death will appear later.

John Bass Jones is buried in the Jones plot at the Moss Springs Cemetery in Jasper County. His wife returned to her family in Arkansas and never married again. She resumed using the McFerrin/McFerren name since she was married to her first husband much longer than she was to John Bass Jones. She appears on the 1870 Census Record for Saline County, Arkansas as follows:

Mary J Mcferren
[Mary J Pipkin McFerren]
Age in 1870:
33
Birth Year:
abt 1837
Birthplace:
Arkansas
Home in 1870:
Saline, Saline, Arkansas
Race:
White
Gender:
Female
Post Office:
Benton
Household Members:
Name/Age
Mary J Mcferren 33
Mary Kesterson 14
William V Kesterson 12
Dinah Etherly 16
Jane Etherly 5(23)

[Note: The Kestersons are probably a niece and nephew. Mary Jane had also taken in a young black woman (Dinath Etherly and her daughter (or another relative), five-year old Jane Etherly.]

Mary Jane died November 4, 1870, and she is buried with her family in the Pipkin Cemetery in Saline County, Arkansas. Her Find-a-Grave Memorial follows:

Birth: Nov. 3, 1836
Death: Nov. 4, 1870

Daughter of Willis and Mary Couch Pipkin.

Wife of John McFerrin, Married on June 19, 1851 in Saline County.

Note: Headstone spelled McFeren, marriage license is McFerrin. Her husband’s Civil War records list the spelling as McFerrin and McFerin.

Her husband,John McFerrin, enlisted in the Civil war on February 20, 1862 in Benton, Arkansas. He was sent to the hospital on May 5, 1862 in Okolona, Mississippi. His regiment, Colquitt’s Company E Arkansas Infantry, never heard from him again. He was removed from the muster rolls on August 1863, “Supposed to be dead”.

No children were listed in any records.

Family links:
Parents:
Willis Pipkin (1808 – 1848)
Mary Couch Pipkin (1813 – 1890)

Siblings:
Martha Nancy Pipkin Kesterson (1831 – 1903)*
Sarah Pipkin Kesterson (1833 – 1861)*
Mary Jane Pipkin McFeren (1836 – 1870)
Adeline Pipkin Cameron (1838 – 1903)*
William Pipkin (1842 – 1862)*
James M Pipkin (1846 – 1921)*

Note: Pipkin Family Plot, Pipkin Cemetery, Old Congo Road, Saline County, Arkansas. Willis Pipkin on left obscured by cedar tree, wife Mary Pipkin in unmarked grave in center, daughter Mary Jane McFeren on right. Both stones are broken.

Burial:
Pipkin Cemetery
Salem
Saline County
Arkansas, USA

Created by: LouJane Adams Wills
Record added: Apr 01, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 67764121(24)

References

(1) Inscription on John Jones Tombstone, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri
(2) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about John Jones and “Milly” Greer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 13 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) First Regiment (Pipkin’s) West Tennessee Militia, War of 1812 about David Spence. Tennessee State Library and Archives. Nashville, Tennessee
(4) First Regiment (Pipkin’s) West Tennessee Militia, War of 1812 about David Spence. Tennessee State Library and Archives. Nashville, Tennessee
(5) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about John Jones and “Milly” Greer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Civil War Service and Profiles about Harrison Hammer, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) 1860 Census for Nancy T. Hammer, Fidelity, Jasper County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Nancy Greer and John Goodwin. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Isaac Greer and Tabitha Goodwin. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Henry Greer and Harriet Henry. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Charlotte Greer and William McIllwain. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12)Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Isaac Greer and Margaret “Peggy” Richardson. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13)Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Luzany Greer and William Dillahunty. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14)Tennessee State Marriage, 1780-2002 about Charlotte T. Green and James B. Jones. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15)Green Berry Greer Family Cemetery. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16)Dillahunty Family Cemetery. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17)1850 Census about “Phoebe” Jones, Newton County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18)1860 Census about Asa Scott, Granby, Newton, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19)1850 Census about Charlotte T. Jones, Sarcoxie, Newton, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20)1850 Census about Gideon B. Jones, Newton County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(21) U.S. Civil War Soldiers Profiles and Pension Papers about Capt. William Moses Henderson. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(22) Arkansas Marriage Records for Mary J. Pipkin and John McFerrin. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(23)John McFerrin Muster Papers, Civil War. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(24)1870 Census for Mary J. Pipkin McFerren, Saline County, Arkansas. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(25)Mary J. McFerren Find-a-Grave Memorial #6776412. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

To Be Continued in Part Nine: Daniel Spence (1806-1857) and Mary Ann “Polly” Pewitt (1810-1859)

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Seven: Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) and Lewis Jones (1795-1849)

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Pioneer Monument, Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

Milly Catherine Spence was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, and she died at Fidelity, Jasper County, Missouri November 30, 1875. On February 2, 1820, Milly Catherine Spence married Lewis Jones (1795-1849) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Lewis was a son of Daniel Jones (1767-1815) and Sarah “Sallie” Bassett (1769-1837). He was born December 25, 1795 in Franklin County, Virginia, and he died in 1849 in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri. I have already detailed the connection of the Daniel Jones family line with the Pasquotank County, North Carolina Jones families in “Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part One: Setting the Stage”. So I won’t repeat it here. However, a third Jones family will connect with the marriage of Lewis and Milly Catherine’s oldest daughter.

The children of Daniel Jones and Sallie Bassett follow:

1. John Jones (1788-aft.1817). As noted in an earlier article, John was appointed administrator of David Spence’s estate in October 1815 in Davidson County, Tennessee(1). David Spence (1786-1814) was a half brother of Elisha Spence and the son of David Spence (1735-1790) and Judah Perry (1748-1795). David Spence’s estate closed November 16, 1817(2). After that, John Jones disappears from the records. I do not know whether he ever married.

2. Ollie Bassett Jones (1789-1873). Ollie was born in 1797 in North Carolina, and she died July 10, 1873 in Fernvale, Williamson County, Tennessee. On November 28, 1809, Ollie married Samuel Smith (1786-1850) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Their children were: (a) James L. Smith (1810-1868); (b) Sarah “Sallie” Smith (1812-1895); (c) Nancy Smith (b. 1816)–she may not have survived; (d) Daniel Jones Smith (1816-1868); (e)Samuel Smith (1823-1892); (f) Abraham “Abram” Smith (1826-1914); (g) Amelia “Millie” Ann Smith (1828-1902); (h) James Smith (1829-1850); (i)Ollie Emaline Smith (1832-1917); (j) George Smith (b. 1836); (k) Willie Smith–no additional information. A portion of a road sign commemorating Fernvale reads as follows:

“In 1819, Samuel and Ollie Jones Smith settled along the South Harpeth River near the sulphur springs… Other historic families include Allen, Beasely, Givens, Harrison, Hughes, Inman, Ivy, Jones, King, Kirby, Page, Pewitt, Sullivan and White.”

3. Lewis Jones (1795-1849). Under discussion here.

4. James B. Jones (1797-1870). James was born November 21, 1797 in Tennessee, and he died January 20, 1870 in Newton County, Missouri. On September 8, 1821, he married Charlotte T. Greer (1803-1877) in Davidson County, Tennessee. This marriage is another connection to the third Jones family. Their children were: (a) Rachel Emeline Jones (1824-1861); (b) George Jones (b. 1831); (c) Mary Ann Jones (b. 1835); James Jones (b. 1838); and William Jones (1840-1882).

5. Nancy Jones (1801-1879). Nancy was born January 20, 1801 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died June 1879 in Davidson County, Tennessee. On March 4, 1820, she married Christopher Butts (1788-1870) in Davidson County, Tennessee. Their children were: (a) Lyda Butts, b.1817–Christopher may have had an earlier marriage; (b) James M. Butts (1828-1870); (c) Ollie E. Butts (1828-1899); (d) Parmelia Butts, b. 1831; (e) Daniel Butts, b. 1834; (f) Elizabeth Butts (1838-1913); (g) Christopher M. Butts, b. 1841.

6. Elizabeth Jones, b. 1808 in Tennessee. She may have died young.

***

The Family of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Jones

Lewis Jones appears on the 1820 Census for Perry County, Tennessee, dated January 4, 1820(1). A woman his mother’s age appears in the household along with some younger brothers and sisters. He lives in the same neighborhood as John David Spencer where Samuel and Daniel Spence lived. Lewis and Milly were married in Davidson County, Tennessee on February 2, 1820(2). A woman Milly Catherine’s age appears in the Elisha Spence household in 1820(3). The enumeration date is August 7, 1820. That would have been after her marriage. She may have returned home to help her step-mother with the children for a while, especially if Lewis was away or if there was an illness in the family. By 1830, the Lewis Jones family had returned to Davidson County(4).

The children of Lewis and Milly Catherine Spence Jones were:

1. Rebecca Jones (1820-1867). Rebecca was born in 1820 in Tennessee, and she died in 1867, probably in Sarcoxie, Jasper, Missouri. I haven’t found the exact location of her death as yet. She married Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859) on January 17, 1839 in Barry County, Missouri(5). This is marriage united two Jones families, thus connecting a third Jones family into this lineage. I will discuss that family in a separate section. Their children follow:

a. James H. Jones (1844-1920). James was born in January 1844 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died after 1920 in Philipsburg, Granite, Montana. His wife was Rosa “Rosie” McKelby (1850-1920), whom he married in Jasper County, Missouri January 14, 1880. They had one daughter: Sarah Alice Jones, born 1896.

b. John Lewis Jones (1846-1929). John was born February 12, 1846 in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri, and he died October 7, 1929 in Missoula, Montana. He married Henrietta Andrus (1846-1945) in 1874 in Washinton, Utah. They had a number of children: (a) Louis Henry Jones (1876-1880); (b) Lillie May Jones (1877-1900); (c) George Wilford Jones (1878-1955); (d) James Andrew Jones (1880-1909); (e) Emma Jones (1886-1900); (f) Anna “Annie” Rebecca Jones (1886-1965); (g) Myrtle Jones (1888-1900); (h) Nellie Irma “Oma” Jones (1889-1978); (i) Grover Cleveland Jones (1891-1963); (j) Randolph Jones (1892-1900); (k) Thomas Lewis Jones (1899-1908); (l) Irma Jones–no information.

c. George Washington Jones (1848-1887). George was born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1848, and he died after 1887 in Jasper County, Missouri. His wife was Armanda Elizabeth Murphy (1853-1935), whom he married March 20, 1887 in Carterville, Jasper, Missouri.

d. Daniel Greenbury Jones (1851-1924). Daniel was born August 17, 1851 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died October 4, 1924 in Covina, Los Angeles County, California. His wife’s name appears on the records both as Mary Margaret Hicks (1856-1900) and as Martha M. Hicks. They were married March 27, 1873 in Jasper County, Missouri. There children were: (i) Arthur Alvin Jones (1874-1966); (ii) Oliver Wendell Jones (1875-1961); (iii) Elsie Pearl Jones (1877-1880); (iv) Newell Elton Jones (1879-1914); (v) Tillie Lois Jones (1880-1961); (vi) William Jack Jones (1885-1919); (vii) James W. Jones (b. 1888); (viii) Beulah Hester Jones (1893-2000); (ix) Olive Marie Jones (1896-1924).

Some people have suggested a Lorella Jones as a member of this family. She appears to have been born in Illinois, so she would not have been a member of this family. Her date of birth was 1851, so she would have been a twin of Daniel Greenbury Jones. He was born in Jasper County, Missouri.

***

2. Sarah Zane Jones (1823-1862). Sarah was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1823, and she died April 5, 1862 in Jasper County, Missouri. She married William Newton Warren (1820-1883) at Jones Creek, Jasper County, Missouri. He would become Captain William Newton Warren, C.S.A. during the Civil War. Their children were:

a. Lewis E. Warren (1842-1902). Lewis was born December 2, 1842 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died February 28, 1902 in Texas. He is buried with family members in the Prairie Springs Cemetery, Cross Timber, Johnson County, Texas. He appears to have never married.

b. Daniel Columbus Warren (1844-1926). Daniel was born March 28, 1844 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died June 22, 1926 in Joshua, Johnson County, Texas. In Summer 1862, Daniel enlisted in the Missouri Troop Infantry, Company A, 11th Regiment, Parson’s Brigade, Confederate Army in Neosho, Newton County, Missouri, and he served until the end of the war(6). He married Mary Etter (b. 1857) in Johnson County, Texas on July 3, 1876. She had a son named Neil, and it appears that Daniel adopted him.

c. Thomas Benton Warren (1846-1922). (Thomas Benton Warren has been confused with a John Thomas Warren (1844-1922) with the Benton name inserted. This is the correct Thomas!) Thomas was born February 25, 1846 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died December 25, 1922 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas. He did not fight in the Civil War. His wife was Rosanna Catherine Josephine Gant (1855-1911), whom he married in 1873, probably in Texas. Their children were: (i) James Edward Warren (1875-1956); (ii) Ninetta Warren (b. 1877); (iii) Pettie Warren (b. 1878); (iv) William Newton Warren (1880-1962); (v) Perna/Capurnia Z. Warren (1883-1961); (vi) Bessie Warren (b. 1885); (vii) Millie Olya Warren (1888-1975).

d. Elizabeth J. Warren (1848-1913). Elizabeth was born August 12, 1848 in Sarcoxie, Jasper County, Missouri, and she died August 24, 1913 in Johnson County, Texas. She married George Washington Bransom in 1870 in Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas. Their children were: (i) Benjamin W. Bransom (1871-1894); (ii) Mary T. Bransom (1873-1892); (iii) James Allen Bransom (1876-1963); (iv) Samuel H. Bransom (1878-1891); (v) Mittie M. Bransom (1879-1912); (vi) Ida Daisy Bransom (1879-1964); (vii) Charles Otis Bransom (1882-1883); (viii) Effie I. Bransom (b. 1884); (ix) Robert Gus Bransom (1886-1976); (x) George Edward Bransom (1886-1976); (xi) WK Bransom–no information.

e. Melinda Ann “Millie” Warren (1850-1938). Millie was born October 23, 1850 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died February 14, 1938 in Joshua, Johnson County, Texas. On September 10, 1868, she married Asbury Franklin Eddleman (1843-1932) in Johnson County, Texas. He was a private Company C, 10th Texas Regiment, C.S.A.(7). Their children were: (i) William D. Eddleman (1869-1869); (ii) James Franklin Eddleman (1871-1957); (iii) Thomas Wesley Eddleman (1872-1947); (iv) Columbus Edward Eddleman (1875-1963); (v) Grace Edith Eddleman (1878-1921); (vi) Ettie Zane Eddleman (1883-1966); (vii) Reginald Newton Eddleman (1885-1980); (viii) Earl Homer Eddleman (1891-1974).

f. Ketirah or Keturah Warren (b. 1853, Jasper County, Missouri.) Nothing else is known.

g. Robert Newton Warren (1855-1929). Robert was born March 15, 1855 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died January 29, 1929 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas. His wife was Adelia Pearce (1873-1964), whom he married June 29, 1898. They had one daughter: Mable Warren (1899-1989).

h. Mary Ann Warren (1857-1938). Mary Ann was born January 24, 1857 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died September 30, 1938 in Mineral Well, Palo Pinto, Texas. She married Matthew Russell Birdwell (1854-1932) in 1875 or early 1876. They had two children: (i) John William Birdwell (1876-1953); and Bessie Ethel Birdwell (1877-1953).

i. Henry C. Warren (b. 1859, Jasper County, Missouri). He may have died young. I could find nothing more.

j. Sarah L. Warren. I have no more information other than her name(8).

Sarah Zane Jones Warren died in Jasper County, Missouri in 1862 and was probably buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery. Shortly after her death, her husband married Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890) in Jasper County, Missouri. Nancy’s brother was Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859), the husband of Sarah Jane’s older sister, Rebecca. The third Jones family will be discussed in the next article.

Some people place a Lewis M. Warren (1841-1875) in this family as the oldest son. He was born in 1841 in Missouri, and he died in 1875 in Christian County, Missouri. If this were true, the Warrens would have had two sons named Lewis in the first and second position. After researching the matter, I believe I have discovered the identity of Lewis M. Warren. His surname was originally Park. His widowed mother, Nancy Warren, appears on the 1850 Census for Franklin County, Missouri with the following children: Robert Warren (b. 1835); Jane Warren (b. 1837); Ephraim Warren (b. 1839); Lewis Warren (1842-1875); Martha Warren (b. 1846)(9). Further inspection of the records shows that on September 16, 1847, Nelson Warren married Mrs. Nancy Park in Franklin County, Missouri(10). Nelson Warren may have died before the 1850 Census. I don’t know what happened to Nancy Park Warren. She may have remarried, or she may have died after the 1850 Census. Lewis M. Warren served in the Union Army for three years during the Civil War–another factor disconnecting him from the William Newton Warren family(11),(12). The William Newton Warren family–solidly Confederate–relocated to Texas in 1865 after the Union Army entered Missouri. This story is found in Mary Ann Warren’s Obituary:

Mrs. Mary Birdwell, 81, who as a child fled with her mother to Texas on an ox-drawn wagon when invading Yankee troops drove families of Confederate soldiers out of her native Missouri in 1865, died here early early Friday night, following an extended illness.

The wife of the late Matthew R. Birdwell, former cattleman who halped drive marauding Indians from this section, Mrs. Birdwell lived here more than fifty years.

She was the daughter of the late William N. Warren, a former State Representative in Missouri, who served in the Confederate Army as a Captain. Twenty-seven wagons crowded with wives and children of Confederate soldiers, were in the train in which she rode to Texas. Her family stopped in Grayson County, where they remained until the war ended and Captain Warren could join them and in the spring of 1866 they moved to Johnson County where her father settled on a tract of land near Burleson…(13).

Lewis M. Warren did not go to Texas. On February 13, 1866, he married Sarah Jane Adams (1836-1916) in Lincoln County, Kentucky(14). By 1870, he and his family settled in Clay, Greene County, Missouri(15). Lewis died in Christian County, Missouri May 4, 1875(16). His children were: James Charles Warren (1866-1943); Rebecca Frances Warren (1869-1951); Sarah Jane “Sadie” Warren (1871-1957); Mary “Mollie” Warren (1873-1944); Lewis Thomas Warren (1876-1951). He was not a child of William Newton Warren and Sarah Zane Jones.

William Newton Warren and Tennessee Jones had the following children:

a. Amelia Warren, who was born about 1863 in Jasper County, Missouri. Nothing else is known.
b. Gustavos Ericson Warren (1866-1947). Gustavos was born April 13, 1866 in Johnson County, Texas, and he died July 21, 1947 in Sinton, San Patricio, Texas. His wife was Dove Maltsberger (1874-1957), whom he married in Texas in 1899. Their children were: (i) Margaret Warren, born 1902; (ii) Gus E. Warren, Born 1903; (iii) Eric Warren, born 1904; and (iv) George William Warren (1905-1997).
c. Effie Warren (1868-1936). Effie was born October 25, 1868 in Burleson, Johnson County, Texas, and she died June 8, 1936 in Abernethy, Hale County, Texas. Her husband was Richard Marion Hardesty (1870-1944), whom she married in 1894 in Texas. Their children were: (i) Aubrey Newton Hardesty (1896-1968); (ii) Thomas Edwin Hardesty (b. 1897); (iii) Anna May Hardesty (1899-1971); (iv) James Marion Hardesty (b. 1901); (v) Wesley Warren Hardesty (1905-1982); (vi) Rudd E. Hardesty (1907-1975).

***

John David Jones (1827-1870)--Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

John David Jones (1827-1870)–Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri

3. John David Jones (1827-1870). John David Jones was born in Tennessee in 1827, and he died September 28, 1870 in Jasper County, Missouri. He will reappear in later a later article concerning the murder of John Bass Jones (1838-1867). John Bass Jones was a brother of Daniel Jackson Jones (1818-1859) and Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890)–the third Jones family. John David Jones’ wife was Elizabeth Foster (1840-1902). She will also reappear in the John Bass Jones murder article. John David Jones and Elizabeth Foster were married December 20, 1860 in Jasper County, Missouri. Their children were:

a. Thomas Allen Jones (1861-1942). Thomas was born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1861, and he died October 12, 1942 in Southwest City, McDonald County, Missouri. He married Mary Sabrit Thornhill (1874-1944) in Benton County, Arkansas. Their children were: (i) Oliga Jones, born 1891; (ii) Victor H. Jones, born 1897); (iii) Clarence Lloyd Jones, born 1906; (iv) Lucy Helen Jones (1910-1972); (v) Daisy Belle Jones (born 1912).

b. Hettie D. Jones, born in Jasper County, Missouri in 1864. She disappears after the 1880 Census, where she appears in her mother’s household(17). I have no additional information.

c. William H. Jones (1866-1939). William was born in Jasper County, Missouri in July 1866, and he died in 1939 in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri. He married Alberta V. (Birdie) Kessler (1868-1961) in 1889. She was the daughter of Benjamin Franklin Kessler (1832-1919) and Amanda Grace Wing (1844-1915)–my second great grandparents–and a sister of Josephine Virginia Kessler (1865-1925), wife of Salathiel Monroe Spence (1854-1921)–my great grandparents. Alberta was my second great aunt. According to the Ancestry calculator, William H. Jones is my second cousin three times removed. Their children were (i) W. Glenn Jones, born March 1890 in Arkansas; (ii) Neal C. Jones, who was born September 1898 in Missouri; and (iii) Walter Leroy Jones (1906-1964).

d. John D. (Charles) Jones (1871-1924). John was born after his father’s death on January 2, 1871 in Fidelity, Jasper, Missouri, and he died June 27, 1924 in Pineville, McDonald County, Missouri. On March 23, 1893, he married Hattie Rebinah Crocker (1873-1957) in Neosho, Newton, Missouri. They had a son: Raymond Gerald Jones (1895-1967).

***

4. Luvina McClellan Jones (1830-1878) Luvina was born March 28, 1830 in Franklin, Williamson, Tennessee, and she died February 9, 1878 in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho. On March 17, 1850, she married Amos Buchanan (1826-1907) in Jasper County, Missouri. He was a farmer and a minister or an evangelist. The family traveled frequently. By 1859, the Buchanans relocated to Missouri City, Texas. They were in Drakesville, Iowa in 1863. They returned to Missouri for a while and then relocated to Idaho. Their children follow:

a. Rebecca Jane Buchanan (1851-1932). Rebecca was born March 23, 1851 in Neosho, Newton, Missouri, and she died January 1932 in Glendale, Douglas, Oregon. Her husband was Daniel Peter Greninger (1847-1925). Their children were: (i) Minnie Greninger, b. 1871; (ii) Mary Lu Greninger (1875-1946); (iii) Ira L. Greninger (1878-1960; (iv) Audrey A. Greninger (1880-1957); (v) Cora Greninger (1882-1956); (vi) Winifred Freginger (1885-1970); (vii) Bonita Greninger (1892-1892); (viii) Juanity Margerite Greninger (1892-1979).

b. Maryetta Lorella Buchanan (1852-1871). Maryetta was born November 10, 1852 in Missouri, and she died September 10, 1871 in Missouri. I have no additional information.

c. Millie Ann Buchanan (1855-1920). Millie was born March 3, 1855 in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, and she died May 13, 1920 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. She may or may not have married a Ben Wilson. I have no information about him. On May 12, 1878, she married Hiram Buckley Cole (1836-1918) in Moscow, Latah, Idaho. Their children were: (i) Sarah Lorene Cole (b. 1881); (ii) Alta Rebecca Cole (1882-1922); (iii) Hyrum Louis Cole (1884-1947); (iv) Ollie Annice Cole (1887-1962); (v) June Cole (b. 1888); (vi) Constance Mable Cole (1891-1951); (vii) Tressie Abigail Cole (1893-1981); (viii) Millard Donald Cole (1895-1963); (ix) Mildred Dorothy Cole (1895-1972).

d. Levi Perry Buchanan (1856-1857). Levi was born August 23, 1956 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died the following year on September 25, 1857 in Jasper County, Missouri.

e. Mark Lemuel Buchanan (1858-1932). Mark was born March 12, 1858 in Joplin, Jasper County, Missouri, and he died July 13, 1932 in Sedro-Woolley, Skagkit, Washington. On November 20, 1881, he married Sarah Emma Ellis (1864-1934) in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho. Their children were: (i) Myrtle Levina Buchanan (b. 1884); (ii) Oscar Henry Buchanan (b. 1887); (iii) Ollie Viola Buchanan (b. 1894); (iv) Ina Margaret Buchanan (b. 1897); (v) Henry Ellis Buchanan (1899-1938); (vi) Lorna May Buchanan (b. 1901).

f. Ira Samuel Buchanan (1859-1925). Ira was born November 5, 1859 in Missouri City, Fort Bend, Texas, and he died March 31, 1925 in Portland, Multnomah, Oregon. He married Lurana Holden (b. 1869) in 1883. Their children were: (i) William A. Buchanan, born 1884; (ii) Ira R. Buchanan, born 1886; (iii) Charles F. Buchanan, born 1890; (iv) Ashley Buchanan, born 1892; (v) Lawrence Buchanan, born 1894; (vi) Oscar Buchanan, born 1895; (vii) Lillie L. Buchanan, born 1897; (viii) Elmer C. Buchanan, born 1901.

g. Amos Newton Buchanan (1861-1863). Amos was born in 1861, and he died in 1863. I don’t have any additional details.

h. John Andrew Buchanan (1863-1936). John was born October 2, 1863 in Drakesville, Davis County, Iowa, and he died December 22, 1935 in Astoria, Clatsop, Oregon. He married his first wife Nellie Wells August 11, 1889 in Yamhill, Yamhill, Oregon. They had one child: Bonnie B. Buchanan, born about 1891 in Oregon. He married his second wife Madge Belle Bond (1863-1951) on January 16, 1901 in Roseburg, Douglas County, Oregon. Their children were: (i) Mary Maurine Buchanan, born in 1903; and (ii) Louise L. Buchanan, born in 1906.

i. Amos J. Buchanan (1866-1942). Amos was born February 12, 1865 in Missouri, and he died March 3, 1942 in Los Angeles. His wife was Lilly B. Cloyd, who was born in 1876 in Los Angeles. Amos and his wife appear in her mother’s household on the 1920 Census for Julia Mariah Bottom Cloyd(18). A Dale Miller, born about 1914, lives with them. He is listed as Julia’s grandson. I believe he may have been the son of one of Lilly’s sisters–but I haven’t found a Miller married to any of them as yet. He could have been Lilly’s son by a previous marriage, but I haven’t found evidence of that either. He may be the Dale Miller, born about 1914, who died in Los Angelis California June 24, 1921(19). Dale Miller does not appear on subsequent census records for Amos and Lilly Buchanan.

j. Luvina Buchanan (1866-1866). Luvina was born February 13, 1866, and she died November 10, 1866.

k. Dora Belle Buchanan (1868-1955). Dora Belle was born August 1, 1868 in Missouri and she died July 23, 1955. Her husband was George H. Lynch (b. 1856), whom she married in 1894. They had two children: (i) Verna G. Lynch, who was born in 1896, and (ii) Verda Zell Lynch (1898-1990)

l. Cora Buchanan (1870-1968). Cora was born September 3, 1870 in Missouri, and she died May 5, 1968 in Toppenish, Washington. She married William Arthur Jones (1860-1945) on May 10, 1897 in Spokane, Washington. He was born in Rochelle, Ogle, Illinois and his parents were Joseph Henry Jones (1831-1891) and Mary Jane Morgan (1834-1921). This Jones line came from Canada. The children of Cora Alice Buchanan and William Arthur Jones were: (i) Joseph Arthur Jones (1898-1980); (ii) Harold Arthur Jones (1898-1980); (iii) Millicent B. Jones (b. 1903); Miriam Livina Jones (1905-1998); (iv) Clay Buchanan Jones (1909-1993).

m. Margaret “Maggie” May Buchanan (1874-1890). Maggie was born August 17, 1874 in Missouri and she died at the age of sixteen on October 7, 1890 in Yanhill, Oregon.

Luvina McClellan Jones died February 9, 1878 in Moscow, Nez Perz, Idaho. Amos Buchanan married Chlore Isabelle Cole (1853-1933) on June 30, 1878 in Nez Perce, Idaho. They had three children.

a. Pearlie Minerva Buchanan (1880-1963). Pearlie was born October 13, 1880 Near Moscow, Latah, Idaho, and she died July 10, 1963 in Independence, Jackson, Missouri. She married Henry Austin Moriarity (1875-1942). Their children were: Lete B. Moriarity (b. 1905) and Henry Austin Moriarity, Jr. (b. 1908).

b. Fredrick Garfield Buchanan (1882-1953). Fredrick was born March 30, 1882 in Moscow, Nez Perce, Idaho, and he died August 18, 1953 in Columbus, Cherokee, Kansas. His wife was Mary Elsie Nichols (1887-1971). Their children were: (i) Gladys Irene Buchanan (1908-1971); (ii) Della May Buchanan (1909-1971); (iii) Rosa Unis Buchanan (1910-1912); (iv) Julia Onis Buchanan (1912-1975); (v) Ruby Inez Buchanan (1914-1965); (vi) Leonard (Onis) Green Buchanan (1915-1915); (vii) Juanita Louise Buchanan (1916-1971); (viii) Lewis Edward Buchanan (1918-1918); (ix) Cora Alberta Buchanan (1920-1971); (x) Twyla Marie Buchanan (1923-2001); (xi) Cleta Jane Buchanan (1925-1971).

c. Martha Fairchild Buchanan (1887-1932). Martha was born February 2, 1887 in Idaho, and she died June 17, 1932. She appears to have never married. I have no additional information about her.

Amos Buchanan and his wife Chloe Isabelle Cole divorced about 1889. He left for Oregon shortly after the divorce, which was probably the reason for the discord. He wanted to go to Oregon and Chloe didn’t! The children of his first marriage went to Oregon with him, and Chloe’s children remained with her. She relocated to Crestline, Cherokee, Kansas, where she married Henry Wiggins (1841-1910) on November 15, 1892. Their children follow: (i) Ledori Tecoma Wiggins (1892-1895); (ii) Loretti Seattle Wiggins (1893-1981); (iii) Columbia Cole Wiggins (1894-1929); (iv) Unknown Child Wiggins (1888-1889).

Amos Buchanan also remarried in 1889. His third wife was Amanda Frazier (1853-1904). Amanda was born in Missouri, and she died in Oregon. Amanda died in 1904; Amos died May 2, 1907. They are buried together in Roseburg Memorial Gardens, Roseburg, Douglas, Oregon.

***

5. Nancy Jane Jones (1832-1929) Nancy Jane Jones’ records have been confused with Nancy Tennessee Jones (1828-1890). When I first started working on the Jones line, I thought they were one and the same. That isn’t the case. Nancy Tennessee Jones (1818-1890) (already discussed earlier in this article) was a sister of Daniel Jackson Jones and of John Bass Jones (the third Jones line). Nancy Jane Jones was a daughter of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence, and she is under discussion here. She was born February 19, 1832 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died March 19, 1929 in Claude, Armstrong, Texas. Her nickname was “Maxie”, so she appears on some records as Nancy Jane “Maxie” Jones/Hood.

Nancy had two husbands. They were brothers and sons of Joel Owensby Hood (1803-1891) and Nancy Haskins (1807-1876)–my third great grandparents. Their daughter and sister of the two brothers–Manerva Caroline Hood (1824-1901)–my second great grandmother–married my second great grandfather–William David Spence (1827-1907. William David was the second oldest son of Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859)> and Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872). (This whole thing keeps traveling around in a circle!).

On November 20, 1853, Nancy Jane Jones married Norris Franklin Hood (1832-1863) in Jasper County, Missouri. Their children follows:

a. Laura “Laurie” Elmira Hood (1854-1927). Laurie was born October 25, 1854 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died September 8, 1927 in Lockney, Floyd County, Texas. She married Thomas Jefferson Thornton (1847-1929) on January 14, 1874 in Johnson County, Texas. Their children were: (i) William Newton Thornton (1874-1971); (ii) Exander Dudley Thornton (1876-1961); (iii) Walter Thornton (1878-1884); (iv) Charles Fredrick Thornton (1880-1956); (v) Margaret “Maggie” May Thornton (1882-1966); (vi) Minnie Gertrude Thornton (1884-1962); (vii) Lida M. Thornton (b. 1886); (viii) Edwin W. Thornton (1888-1971); (ix) James Claude Thornton (1890-1958); (x) Burton Norris “Pete” Thornton (1894-1970); (xi) Bertie Jane Thornton (1894-1989).

b. Alice Almina Hood (1856-1932). Alice was born August 26, 1856 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died April 1, 1932 in Alamogordo, Otero, New Mexico. On April 24, 1881, she married Joseph Lucas Hudman (1853-1909) in Palo Pinto County, Texas. Their children were: (i) Bessie Lee Hudman (1883-1955); (ii) Willie Norris Hudman (1884-1919); (iii) Donnie Nora Hudman (1885-1980); (iv) Etta Cordelia Hudman (1888-1891); (v) Charles T. Hudman (1889-1947); (vi) Maud V. Hudman (1891-1958); (vii) Olen Warren Hudman (1898-1918); (viii) Glenn Fields Hudman (1898-1966).

c. Charles A. “Charlie” Hood (1859-1861). Charles was born in 1859 in Jasper County, Missouri, and he died in 1861 in Jasper County, Missouri.

d. Eva Lourella Hood (1861-1944). Eva was born January 1, 1861 in Jasper County, Missouri, and she died October 8, 1944 in Vernon, Texas. In August 1881, she married Richard Berry Richardson (1857-1937) in Palo Pinto County, Texas. Their children were: (i) Neppie Mae Richardson (1882-1918); (ii) Maude E. Richardson (1884-1974); (iii) Essie Ollie Richardson (1886-1888); (iv) Willie Glenn Richardson (1888-1963); (v) Richard Norris Richardson (1894-1960); (vi) Nancy J. Richardson (b. 1897); (vii) Eva Louise Richardson (1910-1990).

e. Norris F. “Bud” Hood (1863-1930). Bud Hood was born in Jasper County, Missouri on April 16, 1863, and he died October 24, 1930 in Claude, Armstrong, Texas. According to his death certificate, he was hit by a freight train. There is a question as to whether he ever married. The consensus is that he did not. However, a 1910 Census record for a Norris Hood suggests the following:


Name:
Norris Hood
Age in 1910:
49
Birth Year:
abt 1861
Birthplace:
Missouri
Home in 1910:
Sarcoxie, Jasper, Missouri
Race:
White
Gender:
Male
Relation to Head of House:
Head
Marital Status:
Married
Spouse’s Name:
Maud Hood
Father’s Birthplace:
Tennessee
Mother’s Birthplace:
Illinois
Household Members:
Norris Hood 49
Maud Hood 37
Roy Hood 21
Charley Hood 19
Harrie Hood 17
Rubie Hood 16
John Hood 14
Maggie Hood 12
Mary Hood 6
(20)

Norris Hood–1910 Jasper County–is not Bud Hood. Both of Bud’s parents were born in Tennessee, and 1910 Norris’s mother’s birthplaceis identified as Illinois. I have an idea that Norris Hood (1910 Census) is probably a member of the David K. Hood family, who remained in Jasper County. Will save that for a later article. Additionally, Bud Hood was born in Jasper County, Missouri April 16, 1863. Norris Hood of the 1910 entry was born in Jasper County, Missouri in August 1860.

When the Civil War intensified, Norris Franklin Hood, Sr. signed up to fight. He joined the Confederate 11th Missouri Infantry 11th Regiment, Missouri Infantry Company A. Some people think this was a Union regiment. According to his military papers, the Missouri 11th was Confederate(21). The Joel Owensby Hood branch of the Hood family retained southern sympathies and left Jasper County, Missouri. After leaving Missouri, they did not return–especially after John Bass Jones’ murder!

Norris died February 17, 1863 in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas. I don’t know whether he was killed in a skirmish or whether he died of an illness. Three years later, Nancy Jane married William Washington Hood (1837-1902), a brother of Norris. They remained in Jasper County, Missouri, and left after the John Bass Jones murder. They were in Arkansas and McDonald County, Missouri for a while, and then moved on to Texas, settling first in Johnson County and next in Palo Pinto. They returned to Benton County, Arkansas by 1900, where William Hood died November 20, 1902. Nancy Jane returned to Texas, and she died in Claude, Armstrong, Texas on March 15, 1929. The children of Nancy Jane Jones and William Washington Hood follow:

a. Joel Augustus “Gus” Hood (1868-1953). Joel Augustus Hood was born in Arkansas December 2, 1868, and he died April 10, 1953 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas. He is buried in the Claude Cemetery. His wife was Lurena Bell (1874-1943). Their children were: (i) Myrtle Lee Hood (1895-1982); (ii) Charles Franklin Hood (1898-1948); and (iii) Dessie B. Hood (1902-1994).

b. William Warren Hood (1869-1944). William Warren Hood was born November 1, 1869 in McDonald County, Missouri, and he died May 26, 1944 in Claude, Armstrong County, Texas. His wife was Claudine Brunell Chauveneau (1880-1961). She was born in St. Etienne, France. Their children were: (i) Paul Hood (1899-1985); (ii) Mamie Hood (1900-1942); (iii) Ruth Hood (1901-1984); (iv) Francis “Fat” Hood (1903-1963); (v) Leona Rebecca Hood (1907-1992); (vi) Joe Hood (1912-1968).

c. Hugh Anderson Hood (1875-1930). Hugh Anderson Hood was born July 1, 1875 in Johnson County, Texas, and he died after 1930 possibly in Vernon, Willbarger, Texas. His wife was Anna Arabella Stafford, who was born in 1874. Their children were: (i) Hugh Franklin “Frank” Hood (1897-1961); (ii) Irene Hood, born 1899; (iii) Ethel Hood, born 1902; (iv) Jack Hood (1911-1991; (v) Edith Hood (1913-1914)

d. Finis Abel “Coon” Hood (1878-1938). Finis Abel Hood was born February 8, 1878 in Palo Pinto, Texas, and he died October 2, 1938 in Armstrong County, Texas. His wife was Jesse Mason, born 1882. Their children were: (i) Lonnie Hood, born 1902; (ii) Willie Hood, born 1904; (iii) Robert Hood, born 1908; (iv) Edwin Hood (b. 1912); (v) Owen Hood (b. 1915); Floy Hood (b. 1919.

***

7. James Riley Jones (1835-1868). James Riley Jones was born about 1835 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died before November 21, 1868 in Jasper County, Missouri. He appears on the 1850 and 1860 Census records for Jasper County, Missouri.

A Mystery: Mary Jane Jones (1832-1910)

I found Mary Jane Jones (1832-1910) listed as a child of Lewis Jones and Milly Catherine Spence on a number of Ancestry trees. To date, I do not know whether she should be listed with them. Her parents are identified on her death certificate as L and Unknown Jones(22). She was born October 11, 1832 in Greenville, Green County, Tennessee, which is in the southeastern part of the state. To my knowledge, Lewis Spence and Milly Catherine Jones never lived in Greenville. So I am inclined to believe that she was not one of their children. She married Jotham Franklin Weston (1827-1865) in Greenville. The family relocated to Sullivan County, Missouri, where they appear to have had no connection with the Jasper County people. A summary of her Find-a-Grave Memorial follows:

Birth: Oct. 11, 1832
Greeneville
Greene County
Tennessee, USA
Death: Aug. 25, 1910
Sullivan County
Missouri, USA

Daughter of L and (Unknown) Jones

Mo. Death Cert. #26203

Family links:
Spouse:
Jotham F Weston (____ – 1865)*

Children:
Columbus Page Weston (1852 – 1931)*
William Barton Weston (1856 – 1943)*
Lucinda Catherine Weston West (1859 – 1945)*
Leroy F Weston (1862 – 1913)*
Eliza Ann Weston Stringer (1864 – 1917)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Campground Cemetery
Osgood
Sullivan County
Missouri, USA

Created by: Theron Dowell
Record added: Oct 05, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 21979397(23)

To Be Continued in Part Eight With The Third Jones Family

References

(1) 1820 Census about Lewis Jones for Perry County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) Davidson County, Tennessee Marriage Records, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) 1820 Census for Elisha Spence, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(4) 1830 Census for Lewis Jones, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) Missouri Marriage Records for Daniel Jones and Rebecca Jones, Barry County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jul 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958 about Daniel Columbus Warren, dated March 10, 1931. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958 about Asbury Franklin Eddleman, dated September 17, 1925. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) 1850 Census for Nancy Warren, Franklin County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Franklin County, Missouri Records about Nelson Warren and Mrs. Nancy Park. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles about Lewis M. Warren. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) U.S., Union Soldiers Compiled Service Records, 1861-1865 about Lewis M. Warren. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13) Mary Warren Birdwell Obituary, Dallas News (1938). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14) Kentucky Marriages, 1851-1900 about Lewis M. Jones and Sarah Jane Adams. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) 1870 Census, Greene County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) Gravestone Photo for Louis M. Warren, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17) 1880 Census for Elizabeth Ady, Jasper County, Missouri, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18) 1920 Census for Julia Maria Cloyd. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 9 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19) California Death Index for Dale Miller. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 9 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20) 1910 Federal Census for Norris Hood, Jasper County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(21) U.S. Soldiers Compiled Service Records and Profile, 1861-1865 about Norris F. Hood. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(22) Mo. Death Cert. #26203 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Cited in Find-a-Grave Memorial 21979397 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com
(23) Find-a-Grave Memorial #21979397 about Mary Jane Jones Weston. Find-a-Grave.com. Date Accessed: 11 July 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Six: Playing the Naming Game: Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) and the Roden/Wroughton Factor

Chester County, South Carolina Courthouse

Chester County, South Carolina Courthouse

Elisha Spence, his ancestors and their descendants possessed a common habit: whenever someone had a child, he or she would be assigned a name for someone else in the family. I noticed this in my research and as a result, began looking for possible namesakes in the family. And then I hit a stumbling block with Elisha and Susanna Spence’s oldest daughter. Milly Catherine Spence? Was she named for one person or for two? When I could find no Milly or Catherine or Milly Catherine who would qualify in the Spence families, I turned my attention to the Spencer line where I recently discovered my answer.

Sheer frustration drove me downstairs to my collection of research notebooks early last week. I couldn’t write about Milly Catherine Spence until finding the person she was named for! Approximately thirty to forty notebooks line the shelves of my writing bookcase. They even spill out onto the floor beside the case where they are piled high. These notebooks comprise all of my research notes dating back to the early 1990s. I taught morning classes back in those early days. My afternoons were spent in the Denver Public Library or in our campus library looking for answers. I saved all my notes, right or wrong. It is amusing now to look over those notes and see how many directions I undertook before charting a definite course. Such is the case with my old South Carolina notebook. I found it wedged behind other notebooks on the case. And I also found the answer I was seeking. Milly Catherine Spence was named after John Spencer’s first wife!

I’ve already recounted my failed attempts in identifying John Spencer’s first wife. I encountered significant problems in identifying both wives until DNA matches settled the matter concerning the second. The first wife remained a dilemma. At one time, I thought she was Milly Catherine Duncan, John Duncan’s daughter. But that Milly Catherine married Isaac Farmer. They moved to another part of South Carolina, and she lived until 1837. I found another record indicating that a John Spencer married a Sarah (last name unknown)–but then that John Spencer wasn’t mine. So I was back at the drawing board once again. Then in my South Carolina notebook, I found some interesting clues. The first is a passage from South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) regarding the early Baptist Churches in Chester County, South Carolina:

One of the ministers in Sandy River congregation in 1791 was Rev. William Woodward, who, because of the distance from the old church, gathered a distinct group on Lower or Little Sandy River in 1789; this body received separate constitution in 1792. Mr. Woodward then became the minister of the new church and remained in that position until his death. He was assisted for a time after 1793 by Mr. Vandiver, a candidate for the ministry. f643 The church tried Amos Layard’s gift but refused to license him: it extended “Brother Gents’ license of exhortation to preach any place where a door may be opened.” Brother Simonton was apparently treasurer, but it was later decided that this function should belong to the deacon’s office, and Brother Redmond replaced Mr. Simonton. Cases for discipline brought up in the early years include two for joining the Masons, and the authority of the church was strong enough to cause the offending brethren to promise either not to meet with the Masons or to leave the order entirely. The church insisted upon strict observance of the Sabbath, James Hand should have started to market on Monday or Tuesday and thus have avoided traveling and working his horses and slaves on Sunday, as he was forced to do by starting on Friday; other members were reprimanded for walking or riding over their farms on Sunday. A resolution to allow grievances to be laid before the deacons prior to being submitted to the church was soon rescinded. In an interesting trial of a woman accused of knowingly marrying a man already married, the woman’s opinion that the trial committee was prejudiced caused the church to allow her to choose the majority of a new committee which reported in her favor. f644 The membership of Lower Sandy River rose from fifty in 1792 to fifty-five in 1794, but when it entered the Bethel Association in 1803, it numbered thirtytwo. f645 The church is said to have had three buildings, the first on land of Eli Cornwell on Sandy River. About 1800 it was decided to remove the church to a more convenient location. A group of trustees consisting of Elder William Woodward, Richard Evans, James Huey, Daniel Tressels, Henry Carter, Mason Huey, Jacob Dungan, Nobley Coates, and Neguens Whitted bought on October 11, 1802, a lot for three hundred dollars upon which a second wooden building “was erected beyond the cemetery in the direction of Chester” five miles from Chester on the Ashford ferry road. f646 The branch of Pacolet on Fishing Creek, which claims to have been organized in 1792, was so well established in 1793 and 1794 as to have supplies appointed for it by the Bethel Association. Its separate constitution must have taken place in 1795, as in that year Pacolet dismissed nineteen members, and a new church on Fishing Creek called Hopewell entered the Bethel Association. The new church had no minister until 1801 or 1802, when Rev. Samuel Eccles took up the work. He probably remained with the church only through 1803, after which Samuel McCreary, who was at that time a licensed minister, must have preached for them. Hopewell had few members until stirred by the great revival. f647(1)

From South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) by Leah Townsend:
Ahimaas Spencer, 189n, 193, 224+
John Roden, 141+
William Roden, 141n, 147, 147n
William a member of Pacolet, which became Skull Shoals in 1787(2),(3)

I had forgotten all about the Roden family. When I discovered this item in my notebook, I remember writing the name down.

Then came another discovery! While searching into their records, I discovered that I had “danced” with them before!

“Roden” was originally “Wroughton”–a family discussed in my third book: Chasing the Wild Bunch: One Woman’s Journey. The Wroughtens resided in Dorchester County, Maryland. While researching them several years ago, I had no idea that a line of their descendants eventually settled in Chester County, South Carolina!

The Roden/Wroughton Factor

Mary Catherine (“Milly” Catherine) Roden was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and she died in 1784 in Greenville County, South Carolina. It was still 96 District at the time of her death and did not become Greenville County until 1786(4). She was the daughter of Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807) and Mary Potts (1720-1785), the granddaughter of John Roden, Sr. (1685-1720) and Elizabeth Jane Winman (1687-1721), and the great granddaughter of William Wroughton (1663-1746) and Hannah Meredith (1663-1689). It appears that the elder William had three wives: Hannah Meredith (1663-1689), Hannah Susannah “Anna” Mace (1660-1702), and Rachel Wingate (1668-1746). William Wroughton comprised a small section of the book I previously mentioned, so I’ll deal with him first.

A Quaker, William Wroughton was a prominent individual in Dorchester County. When he died May 18, 1746, he left his estate to his oldest son Thomas, provided for his beloved wife, Rachel, and also provided for her daughter Rachel Wroughton, who subsequently married a Pritchett(5). When I conducted my original research on William Wroughton several years ago, I lamented that many of the records were jumbled. It was difficult finding two people who agreed on anything since original Dorchester County, Maryland records were destroyed over time. Based upon my earlier research and the research I have recently completed, the following is an outline for his family:

The children of William Wroughton and Hannah Meredith:
1. Thomas Wroughton (1684-1765)–his father’s chief heir. Thomas was born in 1684 in Dorchester County, Maryland, and he died May 4, 1765. I have no additional information about him.
2. John Wroughton/Roden, Sr. (1685-1720)–Mary “Milly Catherine Roden’s grandfather. John was born in 1685 in Dorchester County, and he died April 24, 1720 in Calvert County, Maryland. His wife was Elizabeth Jane Winman (1687-1721), the daughter of Edward Winman (1640-1702) and Mary (last name unknown). A story about John and his wife follows:

Notes:
John was apparently brought up in Dorchester County, Maryland. He met Elizabeth Winman, who was also being courted by George Wade, Jr. Apparently John was the more persistent of the two in his pursuit of Elizabeth, for they were married in May of 1706(6).

It is possible that John learned a lesson from his brother, Henry, which I will discuss later. It is also interesting to note that shortly after John died in 1720, his wife married George Wade.(7)

The children of John and Elizabeth Wroughton/Roden follow:

(a) John Roden (1707-1787). John was christened March 7, 1707 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(8), and he died in 1787 in South Carolina. I have no additional information about him.
(b) William Roden (1710-1770William was christened October 11, 1710 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(9), and he died in 1770 in Chester County, South Carolina. His wife has been identified as Jane Winman (1712-1762), who may have been a cousin. Their children were: (i) Thomas Roden (1731-1793); (ii) Jeremiah Roden (1737-1821); (iii) William Roden (1738-1799); (iv) John Roden (1739-1821); (v) George Roden (1743-1836); (vi) Zadock Roden (1745-1794). William’s second wife was Mary Willifield.
(c) Sarah Roden, who was christened November 16, 1713 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(10). I have no additional information about her.
(d) Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807)–Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden’s father. I will detail her family separately.
(e) Ann Roden–I only have her name
(f) Susannah Roden–I only have her name.

What I have learned from these names is that Susannah/Susanna was as much of a Roden/Wroughton name as it was a Toney name! John Roden settled in Frederick County, Maryland. John’s sons moved to South Carolina.

3. William Wroughton (1686-1738). William was born in Dorchester County and died there. He died before his father. I have no information about him.

The children of William Wroughton and Hannah Mace:

1. Dorcas Wroughton (b. 1690). I have no additional information.
2. Henry Wroughton (1695-1747). The note on my ancestral tree reads: “Betrothal to 2nd cousin, Mary Meredith, but the marriage did not take place. Mary married James Robert Ingram”(11).

Mary Meredith (1695-1712) and James Robert Ingram (1692-1757) were my my sixth great grandparents on my father’s Inghram line and James Robert Ingram is my fifth great grandfather on my father’s Stillians line–hence my earlier comment concerning John Roden’s wooing of his wife Elizabeth Winman! (I know nothing else about Henry Wroughton).

3. Josias Wroughton (1695-1761). [He may have been Henry’s twin.] Josias lived his life in Dorchester County. I know nothing more about him, although he did acquire a property in Dorchester County called Lazy Hill on November 15, 1728(12).
4. Ambrose Wroughton (1700-1747). Ambrose lived his life in Dorchester County. I know nothing else about him.

As already noted, William Wroughten and his third wife Rachel Wingate had one daughter: Rachel Wroughten, who was born about 1703 and who married a Pritchett.

The Family of Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807)

Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden’s father Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. was born in 1715 in Calvert County, Maryland, and he died July 7, 1807 in Chester County, South Carolina. His wife was Mary Potts (1720-1785). According to an paragraph attached to my ancestral tree (original author unknown):

Thomas was one of the earliest Roden’s in Chester County, S.C. and he probably came with his brothers Zadoc, John Sr., William, and Jeremiah. Thomas owned 1,172 acres in Camden County. This grant received of the Rt. Hon. Charles Gercil Montagu, the governor of Normandon and Chief of the Province of S.C. Thomas’ estate was administerd 7-17-1809 by Richard Wilkes, with Wm. Wilkes and Alex Wilson. He was in Chester County as of 1764, purchasing land to which his brother, John Sr. was a witness.(13)

Thomas’s brother William had a son named Zadock, so that may be the reference here. The important thing about this paragraph is that it provides a Chester County entry date of 1764 for Thomas.

Thomas married Mary Potts in Anne Arundel County in 1732. A discussion of their family follows:

1. John Roden (1740-1807) John Roden was born in 1740 in Maryland and he died October 6, 1821 in Chester County, South Carolina. I have no additional information for him.

2. George Roden (b. 1743) George was born March 25, 1743 in Calvert County, Maryland, and he died in Kentucky. The date of his death is unknown but it would have been after February 27, 1834 in Graves County, Kentucky George’s story unfolds in his Application for a Pension for Service in the Revolutionary War:

State of Kentucky Graves County: On this 27th day of February 1834 personally appeared before the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County and state aforesaid George Rowdon aged ninety years and eleven months a resident of the said County of Graves and State aforesaid who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated (to wit) he states that he was born in the County of Calvert and State of Maryland on the 25th day of March 1743 (he once had a record of his age but it is now lost out of his possession) — this declarant’s father moved with him from Calvert County Maryland where he deponent was a child said 4 or 5 years old & settled in Frederick County Virginia on the Shenandoah River where this declarant lived with his father until about the year 1763 when he with his father migrated to Camden district in the State of South Carolina. That he first entered the service of the United States in the said district of Camden in State of South Carolina in the month of May in the year 1778 as a private drafted militia man and was placed under the command of Captain John Winn with whom he marched on an expedition against Saint Augustine in East Florida he joined (near Augusta in Georgia) a large corps of troops under the command of General Robert Howe — with whom he marched as far as the Oconee River where he was ordered to stop & stayed with a sick man by Captain Winn and gave him a written order for that purpose he stayed with this sick man (who was afflicted with a swelling in his groin) until the month of September 1778 when he returned home with him where he arrived in the latter part of September 1778 he states that he was in the service of the United States 4 months and 2 weeks this tour to wit under Captain John Winn & General Robert Howe – in the year 1778 and that he received no written discharge. This declarant states that he entered the service of the United States the 2nd time in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina in the month of April 1779 Savannah in Georgia was at this time occupied by the British which caused the Tory population of South Carolina to be troublesome to quell which mounted companies of militia man were kept in continual motion this declarant joined one of these mounted companies at the time and place above stated as a volunteer private furnishing his own horse he states that he entered for 6 months & that the said company was raised by order of General Richard Winn of the South Carolina militia and that said company was placed under the command of Captain __ Threewitts [sic, Threewits] with whom this declarant marched to the plantation of Ankram [sic, Ancrum] on the Congaree [River] where they kept their head quarters about 3 months ranging over & protecting the country from Ancrum’s this declarant with Captain Threewits marched to Orangeburg where they remained stationed 3 months after which this declarant was discharged by Captain Threewits he states that he served 6 months this tour under Captain Threewits and that he was the commanding officer on the expedition. This declarant states that he entered the service of the United States the 3rd time in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina as a drafted private militia man he was drafted for a 6 months tour of duty and was placed in a company commanded by Captain John James he marched with Captain James in the month of March 1782 a place called the four holes not far from Charleston at which place he joined a considerable corps of drafted militia under the command of Colonel Hopkins he remained in the service under these officers stationed occasionally at the four holes until the month of September 1780 in which months he was discharged by Captain James he states that he served 6 months under the above named officers at the time above stated. He states that he entered the service of the United States the 4th time as a mounted volunteer private militia man furnishing his own horse he entered in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina in the month of January 1781 under Captain John McCool & marched with Captain McCool & his company in pursuit of the Tory Colonel Will Cunningham [“Bloody Bill” Cunningham] date pursued the Tories to the Congaree & down that River some distance and after scouring the country for some time we returned home when your declarant was disbanded with the rest of the company by Captain McCool in the month of February 1781 he states he served one month under Captain McCool & that he was the commanding officer on the expedition. He states that he entered the service of the United States the 5th time immediately after his return from the expedition under Captain McCool in the month of February 1781 he was drafted as a private this time by order of General Richard Winn for 4 months in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina he entered under Captain Lyles & marched to Orangeburg where we joined a Regiment under Colonel Hopkins he states that he remained with Colonel Hopkins at Orangeburg 4 months when he was discharged by Captain Lyles he states that he served 4 months this time under Captain Lyles & Colonel Hopkins he was discharged in the month of June 1781. This declarant served his 6th tour of duty as a private in the year 1781 he was drafted in the said district of Camden and State of South Carolina for a 3 months tour of duty he entered in the month of July 1781 and was placed in a company commanded by Captain __ Martin he marched with Captain Martin to join General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] but did not reach General Green in consequence of some misconduct of Captain Martin who these are did his company in the beginning of September 1781 just before the battle of the Eutaw Springs. In consequence of which desertion the whole company returned home he states that he served 2 months this tour under Captain Martin. Thus your declarant served 4 months and 2 weeks in the year 1778 under Captain John Winn & General Howe; 6 months under Captain Threewits in the year 1779 — 6 months under Captain John James & Colonel Hopkins in the year 1780 — one month in the same year under Captain John McCool — 4 months under Captain Lyles and Colonel Hopkins in the year 1781 and 2 months in the same year under Captain Martin making in the whole one year and 11 months and 2 weeks besides a variety of small scouting tours which she has not enumerated. He states that he has long since lost all his discharges and that he has no documentary evidence of his services and that he knows of no living witness by whom he can prove his services he states that Asa Dodson, Talbot E. Slaydon, John Clapp, Adam Clapp and Henderson Gregory etc. all his neighbors who will bear ample testimony to his character for veracity and as to his reputation of having been a soldier of the revolution. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state or Territory whatever. This declarant states that he moved from Camden district South Carolina to Warren County Tennessee in the year 1817 & from thence he moved to Madison County Alabama in the year 1821 & from thence he moved to Graves County Kentucky in the year 1830 where he has resided ever since & where he at present resides.
S/ George Rowdon Subscribed & sworn to before the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County & state aforesaid S/ Matthias Travis, JP [William Holifield, a clergyman, and Ervin Anderson gave the standard supporting affidavit.](14)

I find it interesting that George Roden and Levi Spence (Elisha Spence’s second son) were in Graves County, Kentucky about the same period of time. Levi Spence is the subject of Part 5 of this series.

3. William Roden (1745-1800). A copy of William’s will follows. He was born in 1745 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died September 5, 1800 at Brushy Fork, Chester County, South Carolina. His wife was Mary Margaret (1745-1805), by whom he had a son–Jonathan Roden (1775-1854). A copy of the will follows. To view it, click on the image:

William Roden 1800 Will

William Roden 1800 Will(15)

***

4. MARY CATHERINE (“MILLY CATHERINE”) RODEN (1754-1784). Mary was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and she died in 1784 in 96 District, South Carolina (what would become Greenville County in 1786). Judging from available Ancestry trees, a number of family researchers believed a child named Mary was in this family, but they knew nothing else about her. Mary’s name is listed as either Mary?? or as Unknown Daughter.

There is an interesting story about Mary. When she was little and people asked her about her name, she would pronounce it “Miwy Catrin!” The family began calling her “Milly!” And so she became known as Milly Catherine from that day forward. And there is something else quite interesting about Milly Catherine Roden. She was probably some degree of cousin with Caroline Toney, although I haven’t discovered that connection as yet. Milly married John Spencer (1750-1801) in Chester County, South Carolina in 1769, and returned with him to 96 District. Milly Catherine and John would have three sons. I’ve already discussed them earlier, so I will not go into detail here. However, I will list them separately and add additional information I have discovered about them:

Levi Spencer (1770-1844). (A Levi Roden will appear in one of the family groups listed below. They were born about the same period of time. One of them was named for the other. And, of course and as already noted, Levi Spence was named after Levi Spencer). I have figured out why Levi Spencer opted to go to Georgia. A number of his Roden cousins went from South Carolina to Alabama first and then to Georgia. Some of those cousins also went to Alabama and to Georgia by way of Tennessee.

John David Spencer (1775-1820). I’m beginning to think that this was the father’s full time: John David Spencer, Sr.! The argument is well-founded because John David’s grandfather’s full name was William David Spencer. The elder William used his middle name for two sons: William David Spencer and John David Spencer. Young John David was named for his father and his grandfather.

Thomas Spencer (1784-1810). Milly died giving birth to Thomas. He is named for her father: Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. I don’t know his middle name as yet, but his full name may be Thomas Roden Spencer!

John Spencer married Caroline Toney after Milly’s death. This wasn’t a chance meeting. He went to Virginia where he married her. They stayed in Virginia for a couple of years and then returned to Greenville County. He met her through his first wife. I think the two women were closely connected. I also believe Caroline went to 96 District to help Milly with the boys. Two children were born of John Spencer’s second marriage:

Susanna Roden/Rhoda “Susie” Spencer (1785-1810).–my fifth great grandmother! The name Susanna is both a Toney name and a Roden name. Her middle name was Roden and was eventually changed to Rhoda. That is a Toney, Roden, and a Spence name. She became Elisha Spence’s first wife. I also now believe she was specifically named for Jeremiah Roden’s wife. [See below.] [ALSO SEE LINK TO UPDATE AT THE END OF THIS ARTICLE.]

Abraham Spencer (1788-1865). I don’t know the source for Abraham Spencer. I would say it is a Spencer name. It may have also been a Roden name.

***

5. Jeremiah Roden (1754-1851). Jeremiah was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died January 1, 1851 in DeKalb County, Alabama. He would have been Milly’s twin. Jeremiah fought in the Revolutionary War, but his pension application was eventually rejected the year after his death(16). His wife was Susanna Kirkland (1755-1855), whom he married April 28, 1784 in Fairfield County, South Carolina. Susanna Spencer, daughter of John Spencer and Caroline Toney, may well have been named for her since Susanna Spencer was born the following year! And Jeremiah was Milly Catherine’s twin! Jeremiah and Susannah Roden had the following children: (a) Margaret Roden (1784-1874); (b) John B. Roden (1787-1876); (c) Jeremiah Roden (1792-1836); (d) Benjamin Roden (1795-1851); (e) Nancy Roden (1801-1880).

6. Thomas Winman Roden, Jr. (1758-1793). Thomas was born in 1758 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died in June 1793 in Chester County, South Carolina. Thomas is rather unique in the Thomas Sr. family. While his brothers fought on the side of the Patriots in the American Revolution, Thomas Jr. remained a loyalist. I believe his loyalty to England did not arise out of any great love for the Monarchy. For the most part, the Rodens were Baptists and according to Leah Townsend, some Baptist groups were “nonresistant” or pacifistic in sentiment(17). Thomas Jr. may have belonged to a pacifist Baptist group. I don’t know how this issue settled with the rest of his family, but I believe that he and the John Spencer family were close. I say this because of the “naming game” played out when Thomas and his sister Milly named their children. Thomas married Mary Brown (1758-1790) in Anne Arundel County, Maryland in 1732. Their children follow. [Note: I will expound on some of them because of their names.]

a. Thomas Roden, born 1774. He may have died young. I know nothing else about him.
b. Alice Roden (1776-1855). Alice was born in 1776 in Chester County, South Carolina, and she died in Chester County July 28, 1855. She married Richard Wilkes (1769-1840). Their children were: (i) Mary Wilkes (1795-1851); (ii) Thomas Wilkes (1796-1838); (iii) Martha Wilkes (1798-1859); (iv) Lydia Wilkes (1802-1842); (v) Nancy Wilkes, b. 1803; (vi) Regina Wilkes, b. 1805; (vii) John Wesley Wilkes (1809-1825)

c. LEVI RODEN (1779-1852). Levi was born nine years after Levi Spencer. He was born in Chester County, South Carolina in 1779, and he died in Tippah, Mississippi on April 15, 1852. His wife was Malvina Selina Blank (1780-1842). Their children were: (a) Sarah Roden (1799-1870); (b) Allisee Frances Roden (1801-1880); (c) Spencer William Roden (1801-1856); (d) Elizabeth Frances Roden (1808-1878); (e) Polly Roden (1809-1850); (f) Joshua Emory Roden (1810-1894); (g) Lavinia Roden (1816-1866); (h) Savilla Roden (1820-1866); (i) Levicy Roden (b. 1822). His second wife was Elizabeth “Betty” Isbell (1799-1856). I believe she may well connect with the Isbell family I wrote about in my third book referenced above, but I haven’t confirmed that as yet.

d. John B. Franklin Roden (1785-1870). John was born in Chester County, South Carolina in 1785, and he died in 1870 in DeKalb County, Alabama. His wife was Catherine Jane (Roden) (1796-1870). Their children were (a) Sarah “Sallie” Roden (1815-1865); (b) George Washington Roden (1821-1916); (c) John Harrison Roden (1826-1900); (d) Archibald C. Rodden (b. 1833); (e) Mary E. Roden (b. 1835).

e. WILLIAM SPENCER RODEN (1790-1850). William was born in 1790 in South Carolina, and he died in 1850 in Blount County, Alabama. He married Mary Catherine Mayfield (1792-1834) in 1810 in Alabama. Their children were: (i) William Brassell Roden (1812-1884); (ii) Malinda Roden (b. 1827); (iii) Miller Roden (b. 1834).

7. Savilla Roden (1759-1854).Savilla was born in Frederick County, Maryland in 1759, and she died July 23, 1844 in Clinton, Greene County, Alabama. She married Moses Hill about 1780 in Chester County, South Carolina. He died in 1821. Their children were: (a) Thomas Hill, born 1780; (b) James Hill, born 1782; (c) Elizabeth Harrison Hill (1793-1838); (d) Moses Berry Hill (1795-1824); (e) Harriet Windham Hill (b. 1801); (f)George Washington Hill (b. 1803); (g) Rebecca Carlisle Hill (1807-1842); (h) Littleton Hill; and (I) Sarah Hill.

***

After reviewing all my evidence, I have come to one conclusion!

John Spencer’s first wife was Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden.

I still have a lot of work to do on this. I hope to find the connecting link between the Toney family and the Wroughton/Roden family. All of that could take some time. (Well, look how long it has taken me to reach this point!)

The Wroughten/Roden family will be put on hold for a while. Now, I need to catch my breath and then turn my attention once again to the Spences.

This article has been updated. Click here for the update!

To Be Continued in Part Seven with Milly Catherine Spence and Lewis Jones

References

(1) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.
(2) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.
(3) Beall, Barbara Inman, Notebook of South Carolina Research (Collection of Published Sources), (1994-2015).
(4) Beall, Barbara Inman, Notebook of South Carolina Research (Collection of Published Sources), (1994-2015)
(4) William Wroughton Will, May 1746. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(5) “Rivers Through Time; The History of the Roden and Milwee Families” by Johnnie Geneva Roden Dole Gambel, Chap IV, Page 1. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(6) U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Elizabeth Winman Roden and George Wade. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about John Roden (Rhodin). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about William Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about Sarah Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches about Henry Wroughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) Settlers of Maryland (1679-1783) about Josias Wroughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) Paragraph titled “Land” about Thomas Winman Roden, Sr., Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13) George Roden (Rowden) Revolutionary War Application for Pension, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2014. Available online at: http://www.ancestry.com
(14) William Roden 1800 Will (Image of Transcription), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Dated Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900 about Jeremiah Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part One: Setting the Stage

Scene from Perry County, Tennessee--Photo taken May 2005

Scene from Perry County, Tennessee–Photo taken May 2005

So–just who was Elisha Spence?”

This question has plagued me more than once over the years. Elisha Spence was my fourth great-grandfather!

A younger son of William and Judah Spence, Elisha became inflicted with wandering–a condition I commonly label “The Itchy Foot Syndrome”. I have yet to discover his middle name. Elisha may well have been his second name. If so, his first name is unknown. He also appears to have used a nickname Li or Lisha on numerous occasions, depending upon the user. His parents both named him for Elisha McBride (the Spence family) and Elisha Hunter (the Perry/Hunter Family). If so, his full name may have been Elisha McBride Spence or Elisha Hunter Spence. Because Judah’s mother was a Hunter, I tend to favor the second suggestion.

Born in Pasquotank, North Carolina in approximately 1776, Elisha Spence was nine years old when his father died. His mother married William’s brother, David Spence, shortly thereafter. David’s property joined William’s, and so the two families were closely aligned. David had two sons by his first wife: Lewis Spence (1775-1811) and John David Spence (1776-1830)–both of whom would later appear on early Tennessee records with Elisha.(1) After David and Judah’s marriage in 1785, Elisha acquired two additional brothers, both of whom would also relocate to Davidson County, Tennessee: David Spence (1786-1814) and William Spence (1787-1873).(2)

For the next five years, the blended families resided in what was then called Camden County, North Carolina. Another brother, James Spence (1730-1804), was the sole executor of William’s estate but by 1787 after William’s estate settled and closed, James and his family moved to Randolph County, North Carolina.(3) Elisha may have traveled back and forth between Camden County and Randolph, spending time with both families. One of James Spence’s sons, Robert Spence (1767-1825) and Elisha became close friends. A century later, one of Robert’s lines would reconnect with several of Elisha’s lines in Missouri.

Yes, Elisha Spence was a wanderer!

David Spence last appears on the 1790 Census for Camden County, North Carolina.(4) He died sometime between that census record and the end of the year. In 1790 or 1791, Judah remarried again, this time to David Jones (1735-1795)–a son of Capt. Nehemiah Jones (1718-1775), grandson of John Jones (1675-1723), and great-grandson of John Jones (1650-1708). And this is where the Jones story takes an interesting twist beginning with the great-grandfather.

John Jones was born in Wales in 1650, and he died in Pasquotank, North Carolina before January 20, 1708. As noted in a previous article concerning the Jones connection with the Spence line, John had two marriages. His first wife’s name is unknown, but they had a son: Evan Jones (1670-1709). John’s first wife died in childbirth and between 1673 and 1675, John married Elizabeth. Their son, John, was born in 1675 in Albemarle, Virginia. Their other two sons were Isaac Jones (1684-1734) and James Jones (1685-1734). John, b. 1675, was the father of Nehemiah and grandfather of David. The target of interest here is Evan Jones (1670-1709), who arrived in Virginia in 1692.(5) Evan and Nehemiah were half-brothers.

In 1696, Evan married Margaret Sharpe (1670-1747) in Virginia. They had at least one son: James Jones, who was born May 2, 1698 in King George, Virginia. Evan appears to have traveled back and forth between Virginia and England, so he may have been in the merchant business. He died in April 1709 in Stafford County, Virginia. The records become clearer about his son James.

James was born in 1724 in Albemarle, Virginia. He married Frances Mason (1727-1790) on January 8, 1747 in Overwharton Parish, Albemarle, Virginia.(6) Their children were:

1. Jane Jones (1740-1834)
2. Mason Jones (1748-1820)
3. Hannah Jones, b. 1750
4. John Jones (1750-1841)–he would later settle in Giles County, Tennessee
5. Samuel Jones, b. 1752
6. William Jones, b. 1756
7. Mary Jones, b. 1758
8. Sarah Jones b. 1760
9. DANIEL JONES (1767-1815)

Daniel Jones is important to the narrative here. His son, Lewis Jones (1795-1849) would later marry Elisha Spence’s daughter, Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) in Davidson County, Tennessee. And there is another important connection here. Nehemiah Jones’s wife died in childbirth with David Jones (1735-1795)–Judah Perry Spence’s third husband. Nehemiah may have remarried shortly after his wife’s death, and David lived with him at least until 1747 and after his cousin James Jones’ marriage to Frances Mason. David returned to Pasquotank later and served in his father’s militia company, but he retained a close bond with the James Jones children. In later years, he was able to return the favor.

As noted in the earlier article, David relocated to Chowan, North Carolina in 1758, where he appears on tax records.(7) That area became Gates County in 1779. His first wife was Sarah Ellegood (1737-1790), whom he married in Northampton County, Virginia August 24, 1758. Their children were:

1. Pheraba Jones (1763-1838)
2. James Jones (1769-1796)
3. Hezekiah Jones (1768-1827)
4. David Jones (1770-1806)

Daniel Jones was born in 1767 in North Carolina, only his father passed away in Virginia in 1771. David Jones and his wife Sarah Ellegood took young Daniel into their household. He was raised with their children.

By 1787, young Daniel married Sarah “Sallie” Bassett (1779-1837) in Wilkes County, North Carolina. Their children were:

1. John Jones (1788-1817)–He would later become the administrator of the David Spence estate in Davidson County, Tennessee. David (1786-1814) was the son of David Spence (1735-1790) and Judah Perry Spence (1748-1795).
2. Lewis Jones (1795-1849)–He would later marry Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875), a daughter of Elisha Spence.
3. Ollie Bassett Jones (1797-1873)
4. James B. Jones (1797-1870)
5. Nancy Jones (1801-1879)
6. Elizabeth Jones, b. 1808.

The Daniel Jones family remained in North Carolina until approximately 1800 when they moved to Davidson County, Tennessee. David Jones (1770-1806)–the son of David Jones, Sr. (1735-1795) and Judah Perry Spence (1748-1795)–and Jonathan Jones (1785-1847)–the son of Hezekiah Jones (1768-1827) and Nancy Ann Carter (1766-1848) and the grandson of David Jones, Sr. (1735-1795) and Sarah Ellegood (1737-1790)–joined the Daniel Jones family in Davidson County, Tennessee between 1800 and 1804.

While his close siblings remained in the Pasquotank/Camden area, Elisha Spence chose differently. He traveled between Pasquotank and Camden Counties (Spence, Greaves, and related families), Randolph County (the James Spence family), Guilford County (a large Bell family from whom his second wife descended), and Gates and Chowan Counties (the Perry, Hunter and Jones families). By 1795, he traveled to Greenville County, South Carolina, where he encountered the Spencer and Toney families, and where he met and married his first wife!

To Be Continued in Part Two

References

(1) Early Records of Davidson County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) Early Records of Davidson County, Tennessee, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) Stuckey, Erma, Darnall, Spence, Steers, Spangler, Stuckey, Sill and brief accounts of families into which some members married Henry, Illinois: M & D Printing Company (1983).
(4) 1790 Census for Camden County, North Carolina about David Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 29 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s to 1900s. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 30 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Virginia Marriages, 1660-1800, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 30 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) North Carolina Census and Tax Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 30 May 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

The Life and Times of William Edward Spence (1722-1785)–Part Six

pasquotank_river

David Jones was introduced in an earlier section of this six-part article. The son of Capt. Nehemiah Jones (1718-1775), David was born in Pasquotank County, North Carolina in 1735. His mother’s name is unknown. She probably died in childbirth. I have no information that Nehemiah ever remarried. In all likelihood, David was raised by other family members. He may have been raised by the Spences since David Jones and William Spence were close friends. David was also well-acquainted with the Perry and Hunter families.

In 1754, David was still a resident of Pasquotank County (1), but by 1758 he had relocated to Chowan County, North Carolina (2). That portion of Chowan County would become Gates County by 1779. On August 24, 1759, David married Sarah Ellegood (1737-1790) in Northampton County, Virginia (3). The couple settled in Pasquotank, North Carolina, where they appear on various records. In 1766, David Jones appears as a Sergeant in Capt. Nehemiah Jones’s Militia Company along with William Spence (4). In 1769, David Jones appears as a resident of Pasquotank County on various tax records there (5). At this point, I haven’t determined whether he actually fought in the Revolutionary War since a number of men named David Jones from North Carolina appear on records. In 1786, David and his family returned to Gates County (6). His friend, William Spence, had died the previous year. William’s widow Judha married David Spence by Summer 1785.

The children of David and Sarah Ellegood Jones follow:

1. Pheraba Jones (1763-1838). Pheraba was born in 1763 in Pasquotank County, and she died September 14, 1838 in Bedford County, Tennessee. On December 20, 1784, she married William Pallan (1758-1818) in Granville County, North Carolina (7). They had one son: George Washington Pallan (1795-1860). I do not know whether they had additional children.
2. James Jones (1765-1796). James was born in 1765 in Pasquotank, North Carolina, and he died about 1796 in Gates County, North Carolina. James’ wife’s name is unknown. Their children were Hannah, Joseph and Mary Jones. I know nothing else about them.
3. Hezekiah Jones (1768-1827). Hezekiah was born in 1768 in Pasquotank County, and he died in 1827 in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. On May 26, 1784, Hezekiah married Nancy Ann Carter in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. Their children were: Abraham, David, Dempsey, Elizabeth, James, John, and Polly about whom I know nothing. Children with actual birth and death dates follow: (a) William Jones (1792-1833); (b) Jonathan Jones, born 1796; (c) Eli Jones, born 1799; (d) Jesse Jones, born 1805; James Jones, born 1807. I have no additional information.
4. David Jones (1775-1806). David was born in 1775 in Pasquotank County, and he died in 1806 in Davidson County, Tennessee. In 1790, he appears on census records for Gates County, North Carolina (8). David will return later in the Nashville, Tennessee articles.

Sarah Ellegood Jones and David Spence (Judha Perry Spence’s second husband) died about the same time in 1790. Judha Perry Spence, a widow again, left Pasquotank and went to Gates County where some of her Perry and Hunter relatives lived. She married David Jones shortly after her arrival in Gates. They had two daughters:

1. Judha Jones, born about 1791 in Gates County, North Carolina. I know nothing else about her.
2. Esther Jones, born about 1795 in Gates County, North Carolina. I know nothing else about her. In all likelihood, her mother Judha died while giving birth to her.

David Jones died in 1795 in Gates County, North Carolina apparently after his wife since he makes no mention of her in his will. An abstract of his will follows:

1795 JONES, DAVID, Hezekiah, James, David, Pheraba, Judith and Esther (9)

Thus ends the six part saga on the life and times of William Edward Spence. It took me longer posting it than previously anticipated, but I had to update my records as I worked through it. The next article will be a spin-off from this series about another Jones family connected with these people. I need to introduce them before continuing with Elisha Spence.

References

(1) North Carolina Compiled Census Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) North Carolina Compiled Census Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) Virginia Marriage Records (1700-1850). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(4) Three Hundred Years Along The Pasquotank: A Biographical History of Camden County (1957)
(5) North Carolina Compiled Census Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) North Carolina Compiled Census Records about David Jones, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) North Carolina Marriage Records, 1741-2004 about Pheraba Jones. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) 1790 Census about David Jones. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) North Carolina Will Abstracts about David Jones. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Apr 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com