The Life and Times of William Edward Spence (1722-1785)–Part One

McBride Methodist Church, Camden County, North Carolina. The church is located near William Spence's property. We visited this church in May 1998.

McBride Methodist Church, Camden County, North Carolina. The church is located near William Spence’s property, but was not standing when he lived there. We visited this church in May 1998. Picture provided by Melissa Mytinger Fall 1998

Twenty years ago, my early discovery of my fifth great grandfather, William Spence, sent me through reams of records, copies of which I gradually compiled into a huge quantity of notebooks. Trusting early computers, I sometimes kept my records on their hard drives, only to have the computers die taking my records with them. As a result, I was forced to return to libraries where I found the information, recopy the records, and store them somewhere safely–a sadder but wiser experience. Then came a ten-year absence from genealogy followed by retirement. And I have since placed all of those notebooks in one location.

I remember writing an article about William Spence years ago. For the life of me, I can’t find my copy now that I need it. I last saw it a month or so ago. I suppose I shouldn’t mourn the misplacement. Some of the information is different today; new discoveries were made about William during my ten-year absence. I had to rebuild his portion of my ancestral tree with the new, documented information–a way of becoming reacquainted with him. For that reason, I could not object to the process. This article is devoted to William, his life, adventures and family. It is divided into several parts to facilitate reading. Part One is an introduction to William Spence and his connection with the Jones family. Part Two will focus on the Perry family. Part Three discusses William Spence, Judha Perry and David Jones. Part Four focuses on the Revolutionary War and William Spence’s experiences in Charleston. Part Five discusses William Spence’s death and Judha’s subsequent marriage to William’s brother, David Spence, and their children. Part Six concludes with Judha’s final marriage to David Jones and their children.

Six parts–one per week–six weeks.

This is Part One!

Who was William Edward Spence?

The oldest son of James Spence (1702-1753) and Elizabeth Greaves (1707-1755), William Edward Spence, was born about 1722 in Pasquotank County, North Carolina. That portion of Pasquotank County eventually became Camden County. Many of the Camden County records were destroyed in a fire, making Spence research difficult. However, I found some records from other counties which provide a completed picture. Like his predecessors, William Spence had a wandering spirit. He did not stay permanently in one location.

In a way, William stands out in available records by reference to his first name. I could not find many William Spences in his line before William. A number of William Spences followed him. His mother’s paternal grandfather was William Greaves, who was born in Northamptonshire, England about 1630, and he died in the same location in 1664. Elizabeth’s father, John Greaves (Graves) (1665-1747) would not have known his father, but John’s mother may have talked about him. These stories were eventually passed down to young Elizabeth. Her oldest son was thus named William! And William’s middle name Edward was derived from the Greaves family as well.

John Greaves (the immigrant) arrived in Spotsylvania, Virginia about 1688 (1). His wife’s name has been confused so I will post the possibilities here: (Rebecca) Susanna (Virginia) (Harwood/Dickens) (1665-1747). Their children were:

1. John Greaves (Graves), Jr. (1685-1757)
2. Thomas Greaves (Graves) (1691-1767)
3. Edward Greaves (Graves) (1693-1763) [William Spence received his middle name from Edward]
4. Jemima Greaves (Graves) (1699-1764)
5. Rebecca Greaves (Graves) (1702-1814) (Not sure whether these dates are real or whether Rebecca actually lived to be 112!)
6. Robert Greaves (Graves) (born 1702)
7. Isaac Greaves (Graves) (1705-1790)
8. Elizabeth Greaves (Graves) (1707-1755)–William Spence’s mother
9. Mary Greaves (Graves) (b. 1707)
10. Joseph Greaves (Graves) (1717-1774). (Not named in his father’s will. May have left the area before his father’s death.)(2).

There may have been a reason for William Spence’s early wandering–something I have yet to prove. Sometime between 1740 and 1743, William may have married. His second marriage did not take place until 1769; I cannot imagine him waiting until age 47 before tying the knot. I am speculating that his first wife was a Jones–possibly Sarah Jones–and that she may have been a sister of Jarvis and Nehemiah Jones of Pasquotank County. She may have been born about 1723 and she may have died about 1743, possibly in childbirth. Spence connections with this Jones family will unfold throughout the rest of these articles. But I wanted to introduce Jarvis and Nehemiah here with the guarantee that they will return shortly and their families will become significant later.

The Case for Sarah Jones (1723-1743)??

The case for Sarah Jones is really compelling. My case is founded upon two premises. The first is centered on the Spence family connections with the Jones family in Pasquotank and Camden Counties at this period of time and before. The second is centered upon the fact that William’s oldest child by his second marriage was named Sarah Elizabeth: Sarah possibly for his first wife and Elizabeth for his mother. A discussion of the Jones family follows.

If Sarah Jones really lived, she would have been the daughter of John Jones (1675-1723) and his wife Dorothy (1680-1723). Born in Albemarle County, Virginia, John had two marriages. By his first wife Florence, he had one son: Isaac Jones (1701-1776). His second wife was a widow named Dorothy McDaniel. Dorothy had two daughters by her first marriage: Dorothy McDaniel (1710-1723) and Eleanor “Ellie” McDaniel (1715-1743). John Jones and Dorothy had the following children:

1. Maj. Jarvis Jones (1717-aft. 1766). Jarvis had two wives: Miriam Trueblood (1721-1780) and Ruth Upton (b. 1715).
2. Capt. Nehemiah Jones (1718-1775). Nehemiah’s wife’s name is unknown, but they had one son: David Jones (1735-1795) David Jones will reappear in a later section.
3. (If my theory proves true) Sarah Jones (1723-1743). Sarah was the first wife of William Spence. She would have been born after her father’s death.

The names of these people (with the exception of a few) are identified in several wills. An abstract of John Jones’ will follows:

Name: John Jones
Location:
Pasquotank Precinct

Will Date:
12 Dec 1723

Will:
Legatees: Dority and Ele Mackdaniel. Witnesses: Thomas Hearendeen, John Jennings, Benjamin Sawyer. Clerk of the Court: John Parker (3)

A record dated 1720 sheds some light on this matter and may have been a distribution to his sons prior to death. Legatees in his will are Dorothy’s daughters from her first marriage:

Pasquotank County, NC Book A–Pasq Cty: John Jones wife Dorothy owned 100 acres: Sons Isaac, Abraham and Jarvis (4).

It is interesting to note that he does not mention Nehemiah in his will–something that has caused some researchers to suggest that Nehemiah was a nephew of Jarvis:

Captain Nehemiah Jones ca. 1718-1775
The third company was the largest, having an enrollment of seventy-one, including officers and the bounds were “on the Fork Creek on the North side of Pasquotank River and on the Upper of said county,” which area comprises modern South Mills, Tar Corner, Pearceville and Upper Woods. Captain Jones’ ensign was his brother Isaac and the lieutenant was Isaac Litten. The three sergeants named were Samuel Smith, David Jones and John Ralley; the corporals, Samuel Edney, Shadrach Taylor and Jacob Burnham; and the drummers, James and Greves Spence. A glance at the roster shows that while the same names are still generally found in the neighborhood, the frequency with which they occur in the company roll shows that their ratios to the whole population have changed considerably as the years have passed. The surnames appearing most frequently then were as follows: Bright (Brite) and Overton, eight each; Spence, five; Taylor, four, Burnham, Jones, Knight (Kight) and Upton, three each.

Jones describes himself as a merchant, though he was a man of varied business interests. The abrupt cessation in the public records of any reference to his commercial activities during the French and Indian War period may indicate combat service in an active military unit. Although he belonged to one of our leading families, being a son of John Jones, a nephew of Major Jarvis Jones and an uncle of Joseph Jones of the Revoluntionary era, he had no liking for public office. When the Provincial Assembly appointed him a justice of the local quarter sessions court, he refused to qualify. He did serve a tour of duty with Josiah Nash as a patroller, but this task seems to have been looked upon as a necessary obligation of a slaveowner (5).

Nehemiah, a son of John Jones, would have been a brother of Isaac and Capt. Jarvis Jones, and an uncle of Joseph Jones of the Revolutionary War. I suspect that Nehemiah may have married a Quaker, something I will delve into later when I cover his son David Jones. That could be the reason why his father did not mention him in the 1720 devise or as a legatee in his 1723 will. On the other hand, his father could have given him a share separately.

Isaac Jones (1701-1776) was a half brother of Jarvis and Nehemiah (and Sarah, if her relationship can be proven). Isaac married Mary Palmer (born 1703). Their children were:

1. Anna Jones
2. John Jones (born 1725)
3. Lt. Timothy Jones (1727-1798)
4. Dempsey Jones (born 1729)
5. Sen. Joseph Jones (1731-1800)–This is the nephew referred to in Pugh’s book of Revolutionary War fame
6. Mary Jones (born 1733) (6)

These Joneses are destined to reappear later.

* * *

In 1761, William appears on a tax list in Rowan County, North Carolina (7). Like his family members, William became a planter (tobacco), but he went further than most of them. He became a merchant planter and an acquaintance of the Perry family, a group important to this narrative and who is destined to appear shortly. This would be an excellent reason for William and his wanderings. He invested in Rowan County, a region from which Randolph County was carved. His brother, James Spence (1730-1804), eventually settled in Randolph, so he may have been speculating with William. William Spence last appears of record in Rowan County in 1768 (8).

In June 1766, William Spence appears on a muster roster for Capt. Jarvis Jones’ Company under the command of Col. Thomas Taylor (9). His brother, James Spence, appears on the roster, and Joseph Spence, Jr. appears on the roster as well. Jarvis Jones is the Captain; Jarvis Jones, Jr. is the Lieutenant. Other surnames of importance to this narrative include McDaniel, Temple, Williams, Cartwright, Sawyer, Forehand, Davis, Koen, Leak, Gray, Smith, Vardin, and Burnham.

Then in 1769, William Spence married Judha Perry.

TO BE CONTINUED WITH PART TWO

References

(1) Jno Graves in the U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 Feb 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 Feb 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) John Jones 1723 Will Abstract, North Carolina. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 Feb 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) John Jones 1720 distribution. Book A. Pasquotank County Records. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 Feb 2015.

(5) Pugh, Jesse. Three Hundred Years along the Pasquotank. Old Trap: Camden County, North Carolina (1957), p. 61.

(6) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 Feb 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7) State Tax Records for 1761 and 1768. North Carolina State Archives, Division of Archives and History. North Carolina Dept. of Cultural Resources. Raleigh, North Carolina.

(8) State Tax Records for 1761 and 1768. North Carolina State Archives, Division of Archives and History. North Carolina Dept. of Cultural Resources. Raleigh, North Carolina.

(9) Murtrie, June Clark. Colonial Soldiers of the South (1732-1774). p. 785.

James Spence of Randolph County, North Carolina (1730-1804) and Lucy Upton (1734-1788)

This photo was from James Spence's obituary in the Carthage Press. The obituary was dated March 13, 1922

This photo was from Capt. James Spence’s obituary in the Carthage Press, Jasper County, Missouri. The obituary was dated March 13, 1922. Capt. James Spence (1832-1922) was a great grandson of James Spence and Lucy Upton

The second oldest son of James Spence (1702-1753) and Elizabeth Greaves (1707-1755), James Spence was born in 1730 in Pasquotank, North Carolina, and he died in Randolph County, North Carolina in 1804. His wife was Lucy Upton (1734-1788), the daughter of William Upton (1697-1740) and Lavonia Lucy Bright (Brite) (1) (2). When I first began looking for James Spence in the early 1990s, I stumbled across a book I use as a valuable source today: Erma D Stuckey’s Darnall, Spence, Steers, Spangler, Stuckey, Sill and Brief Accounts of Families into which some members married, Henry IL: M & D Printing (1983). I compiled a synopsis of some passages from the book after discovering it in a local library. That synopsis, updated September 1, 2014, follows:

Malachi Spence, born ca. 1769, married ca. 1796 to Courtney Ann Massa Hubbard, b. ca. 1777 in Maryland; died 1817, Madison County, Kentucky. Her father (first name unknown) served in the Continental Army. He was a cabinet maker and made coffins for the Army.

Malachi’s father James Spence of Randolph County came from the Pasquotank/Camden area and had a son named Lemuel Spence–Malachi’s older brother. Lemuel Spence married Elizabeth Jones, Camden County, 1788.

The children of Malachi Spence and Courtney Ann Massa Hubbard Spence:

James Spence II, b. 1 Aug 1797, Randolph Co., NC; m. Susannah Callahan
Mary Spence, b. ca. 1800; m. James Rayburn Rebecca Spence, b. 15 July 1802; m. Nathan Oldham
Keziah (Kezzie) Spence, b. 11 Dec 1805; m. John Darnall. She died 11 Aug 1893.
Sarah Spence, b. ???; m Nathaniel Oldham
Cary Spence, b. 15 June 1811; m. Abagail Cunningham
Williamson D. Spence; b. 12 July 1814; m. Mary Darnall
Lacada Esther Spence; b. ca. 1816; d. 1832. Remained single.
An infant and the mother Courtney, died. p. 539:( Stuckey)

Stuckey continues:

“Concerning James Spence of Randolph Co.–Family records have him with a brother, Lemuel Spence.” (Stuckey, p. 539)

[My note: Lemuel was Malachi’s brother and the oldest son of James Spence. Robert Spence was the second son. Malachi was actually the third son of James Spence. Malachi Spence settled in Madison Co., KY ca. 1806. Malachi and Elisha Spence (my fourth great grandfather) would have been first cousins. Elisha’s father, William Edward Spence (d. Pasquotank, 1785) appt’d his brother, James and his wife Judha (as long as she remains my wife) co-executors of his estate. Will signed in the presence of Ebenezer Sawyer and Letishea Spence (William and James’ sister).]

(James Spence) “would have married before 1769 for we have his son, Malachi, born about 1769 and probably Carolina. Although there may have been others, we have James with four children: ESTHER SPENCE, CARY SPENCE, JAMES SPENCE AND MALACHI SPENCE, and we do not have the order of birth. Cary Spence died from being kicked by a horse, but we do not know if he married and had a family.” REFERENCE Stuckey, Erma D. Darnall, Spence, Steers, Spangler, Stuckey, Sill and brief accounts of families into which some members married. M & D Printing Co., Henry IL (1983) (3),(4).

Finding Lucy Upton’s family was a major project. Fortunately I located some notes I had taken at the North Carolina State Archives while on a trip there in 1998. Her father, William Upton, was a son of John Upton (1670-1715) and Elizabeth Barecock (1669-1715). John died in Pasquotank, North Carolina in 1715. In his will dated June 30, 1715, he identified the names of his children: (a) Mary Upton (b. 1694); (b) William Upton (1697-1740); (c) Edward Upton (1700-1753); (d)Thomas Upton (1700-1750); (e) Joseph Upton (1715-1767); (f) Ruth Upton (b. 1715). William inherited one-third interest in a plantation called Merriday in Pasquotank County, one iron pot and use of a mill. Pasquotank records create an interesting trail for William Upton. He appears to have had four daughters: Ruth Upton (1730-1760); Mary Upton (1732-1760); Lucy Upton (1734-1788); and Keziah Upton (1736-1760), per his will. In July 1719, he was sued by Wilson Reed. The case was dismissed. He served on a jury in 1723 and 1727. On March 16, 1732, he gave his deposition of William Taylor’s land and said that he was a chain carrier. In October 1735, he and another party (William Minsen??) sold 180 acres to Samuel Etherage. In April 1736, he filed suit against Macora Scarbrough. In January 1740, he filled suit against William Fox, but the case was dismissed. Then he died in September 1740. In October 1740, a case filed against him by Willis Wilson was dismissed since William Upton had died. In January 1741, a summons was filed against Cartwright to prove William Upton’s will. The will was finally proved in July 1741 by oaths of Joseph Upton and Thomas Miller. Sometime in 1741, Lucy Upton received her inheritance from her father. She inherited one-fourth interest in Merriday (about 50 acres out of 214 acres). The document mentioned her father William and her grandfather John. Finally on October 9, 1760, Lucy and her husband James Spence sold their interest in Merriday. Lucy’s three sisters are mentioned in the document and the fact that they had already died (5).

[As an aid in following the Rowan/Randolph/Davidson County Spences, I have included a section concerning North Carolina county formation. I will also add that there were two Spence families in the area who were not related or not related directly to the families under discussion here. However, their records have been entertwined with the Pasquotank Spences. David Spence, who settled in Davidson/Surry County and who married Mary Ann McElyea, came from New Jersey after the Revolutionary War. The other Spence line in Guilford County appears to have had roots in Delaware. I have found no direct connection between these two family groups and the Spence families of Pasquotank. Randolph County, North Carolina was formed in 1779 from Guilford County. Guilford County was formed from Rowan and Orange Counties.]

Records for James Spence are a challenge as well since so many men bore the name “James Spence.” After discovering that James Spence of Randolph was the brother of my fifth great grandfather, William Spence, I was able to identify who he was and where he was at certain periods of time. James was born in Pasquotank County about 1730. Since he was the second son of James Spence and Elizabeth Greaves, he and his older brother, William, were close. The IGI record cited above indicates that James Spence married Lucy Upton in 1750 in Pasquotank County. The next record for James and Lucy appears as the land transaction of Lucy’s property in Pasquotank on October 9, 1760, also cited above.

In 1766, both James Spence and his brother, William appear on a militia roster in Capt. Jarvis Jones’ Company in Pasquotank County (6). Between 1780 and 1781, James and William Spence joined the North Carolina Continental Line and fought at the Battle of Charleston, South Carolina. William was taken prisoner. In all likelihood, James was taken prisoner as well since he was given a land grant in Davidson County, Tennessee, as was William. On September 15, 1787, James assigned the land in Davidson County, Tennessee to James Hoggett (7). Two years prior to that, James was named co-executor of his brother, William’s estate. William’s widow remarried, and James became the sole executor of William’s estate. In all likelihood, he and his family remained in Pasquotank until William’s estate closed, and then they moved to Randolph County.

The children of James Spence of Randolph County, North Carolina (1730-1804) and Lucy Upton (1734-1788) were:

1. Lemuel Spence (1750-1795); m. Elizabeth Jones abt 1788 in Camden County, North Carolina. I do not know whether they had any children. Lemuel appears on Pasquotank County records in 1767 (8) and 1769 (9), and on Camden County Records in 1782. He appears on the 1790 Census in Pasquotank, North Carolina (10). In 1795, he is shown in Randolph County, North Carolina with 94 acres of land, 1 white poles, 2 black poles (11). He died after 1795 in Randolph County.

2. David Spence (1766-1815); m. Esther Lambord (1786-1850). David was born in Rowan County, North Carolina in 1766, and he died in 1815 in Surry County, North Carolina. People often contacted me about this family years ago when I first started researching the Spence line. At the time, I could make no connection with the Spence families of Pasquotank and decided they were from a different line living in the Rowan/Surry County area.  Then I had the ten-year absence from genealogy. When I returned, I discovered people were connecting them with other lines. Recently, I undertook a specific study of these people and discovered that they did connect with the Pasquotank Spences and that David was another son of James Spence and Lucy Upton of Randolph County, North Carolina. This article was originally written in January 2015. This section about David Spence is being written nine months later in September 2015. For that reason, I am setting out his family in full. The children of David Spence and Esther Lambord follow:

  1. Betsy Spence, born  about 1804 in Randolph County, North Carolina. Betsy’s husband was Wylie Nixton. Their children were Nancy Nixton and Frances Nixton. I know nothing else about them.
  2. Nancy Spence, born about 1804 in Randolph County, North Carolina. She may have been Betsy’s twin. She may also have married a Wingate. I know nothing else about Nancy or her family.
  3. Malachi Spence (1806-1880). Malachi was born March 5, 1806 in Randolph County, North Carolina, and he died December 6, 1880 in Trap Hill, Wilkes, North Carolina. His wife was Elizabeth Minerva Ramsower/Ramseur (1808-1876). [Note: The Ramsower/Ramseur family ran some mills in the area. Elizabeth was reportedly the daughter of Chief Tahchee “Micheal” Ramsower, who was born in 1790 in Turkey-Town, Alabama, and who died in 1848 in Flint District, Cherokee Nation, and Elizabeth Laxton, who was born in 1780.  Her grandparents were Henry Ramsour (1770-1828) and an unknown Native American. Elizabeth was apparently raised by an uncle and aunt: Michael Ramseur (1765-1830) and Mary Smith (1770-1852). The children of Malachi Spence and Elizabeth Ramseur follow:
    1. James Spence (born 1828)
    2. John David Spence (born 1829)
    3. Elizabeth Spence (born 1832)
    4. Wiley Andrew Jackson Spence (1833-1875)
    5. William Madison Spence (1833-1905)
    6. Joseph Perry Spence (1836-1842)
    7. Henry Benjamin Spence (1838-1911)
    8. Nancy E. Spence (born 1840)
    9. Huldah Spence (born 1844)
    10. Stephen Franklin Spence (1845-1865)
    11. Richard Columbus Spence (1848-1942)
    12. Charlotte Spence (born 1852).
  4. Joseph Perry Spence (1809-1875). Joseph was born in North Carolina April 14, 1809, and he died December 11, 1875 in Honey Grove, Fannin, Texas. His wife was Mary Catherine Baker (1825-1875). I have no additional information about them.
  5. David Spence (born 1811). He died in Surry County, North Carolina. I have no additional information about him.
  6. Henry Spence (born 1813). Apparently, he had two children: Baxter Spence and Frances Spence. I have no additional about him.
  7. Wylie Spence (born 1815). He died in Surry County, North Carolina. I have no additional information about him.
  8. James C Spence (born 1815). He died in Georgia. I have no additional information about him.

3. Robert Spence (1767-1825); m. Lovey Temple Sexton (1773-1857). This family eventually settled in Davidson County, North Carolina. They may have moved to Rowan County first and were initially in Pasquotank County. This is an interesting connection. I once considered Robert Spence a brother of James Sr. of Randolph County. Given the number of Robert’s descendants who eventually relocated to Jasper County, Missouri, I now believe Robert was a son of James, Sr. Robert Spence was born May 19, 1767 in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, and he died after August 24, 1825 in Davidson County, North Carolina. An abstract of Robert Spence’s will follows:

1:39 ROBERT SPENCE. 24 Aug 1825; Prob. Sep 1825
I have given to my son, JOSEPH SPENCE, to the amount of $40.00. And to my son WILLIS SPENCE I give one bay colt at $30.00 and I give him $10.00 in something else. All my sons to be made qual with them when they come of age or marry, that is my sons–JEREMIAH SPENCE, ROBERT SPENCE, DANIEL SPENCE, JOHN SPENCE, MARK SPENCE Alphasmy Reley, D THORNTON SPENCE. My son ALSTON SPENCE to have but 50 cents of my property. My wife, LOVEY SPENCE, all my property, real and personal, during her life or widowhood to be used to support and raise my small children and to give them moderate learning. Further at the death or marriage of my wife, all shall be sold and equally divided among my children (after having been made equal with JOSEPH SPENCE and WILLIS SPENCE)–that is JEREMIAH SPENCE, WILLIS SPENCE, ROBERT SPENCE, JOHN SPENCE, DANIEL SPENCE, MARK SPENCE and THORNTON SPENCE. Executor: William Hannah; Wit: Henry Stewart, Joseph Spence, Alphasmy Reley; p. 8 (12).

The children of Robert and Lovey Spence follow:

a. Alston Spence (1799-1836). Alston was born February 11, 1799 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died August 19, 1836 in Pasquotank County. His wife’s name was Marjera or Marjorie. They had two sons: John, born in 1829, and Joseph, born in 1830. I know nothing else about Alston.
b. Joseph Spence (1801-1876). Joseph was born July 27, 1801 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died April 8, 1876 in Independence, Clay County, Missouri. He had several marriages. His first wife was Alley Skeen (1802-1835). Their children were: (1) Mary Spence (1822-1872); (2) Robert Spence (b. 1827) (3) Osborn Spence (b. 1829); (4) Lovey R. Spence (b. 1830). His second wife was Mary Spence, born 1803. His third wife was Rachel Hurley (1816-1884). Their children were: (1) William Anderson Spence (1837-1878); (2) James Spence (1839-1917); (3) Handsel E. Spence (1842-1864); (4) Allie Phair Spence (1845-1933); (5) Joseph Spence (1846-1854); (6) Isaac N. Spence (b. 1851).
c. Jeremiah Spence (1802-1850) Jeremiah was born February 22, 1802 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died in 1850 in Walton, Florida. His wife’s name was Nancy. I know nothing else about him.
d. Willis Spence (1805-1875). Willis was born October 3, 1805 in Davidson County, North Carolina, and he died September 10, 1875 in Greene County, Missouri, where he is buried in the Elms Springs Cemetery. His wife was Sarah K. Hall (1809-1907). Their children were: (1) Eliza Spence (1828-1900); (2) Alford B. Spence (born 1833); (3) Rachel E. Spence (1836-1914); (4) Emory W. Spence (born 1837); (5) Milton C. Spence (born 1839); (6) Sanford H. Spence (1847-1910).
e. Robert Spence (1807-1843). Robert was born November 1, 1807 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died June 6, 1843 in Davidson County, North Carolina. I know nothing else about him.
f. Daniel Spence (1808-1882). Daniel was born January 30, 1808 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died March 26, 1882 in Davidson County, North Carolina. His wife was Margaret Ann Pennington (1830-1868). Their children were: (1) Chlofus “Clove” A. Spence (1848-1914); (2) Thomas S. Spence (1851-1915); (3) Elizabeth Spence (b. 1853); (4) Robert Spence (b. 1855); (5) James B. Spence (1856-1955); (7) Delphune Spence (b. 1857); (8) Claudis Spence (b. 1859); (9) Anne Spence (b. 1864); (10) Union Spence (b. 1867); (11) Joseph Spence (b. 1869).
g. John Spence (1808-1866). John is an important connection here. John relocated to Adams County, Illinois. He was the father of Capt. James Spence (1839-1922), who later settled in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, a region where a number of his distant cousins had settled. John was born about 1808 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died after 1866 in Adams County, Illinois. He had several marriages. His first wife was Elizabeth (last name unknown); they were married about 1829 in Davidson County, North Carolina. Their children were: (1) William A. Spence (b. 1830); (2) Martha Spence (b. 1832); (3) Daniel Spence (b. 1833); (4) Obediah Spence (b. 1836); (5) Willis Spence (1837-1867)—he died in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri; (6) Capt. James Spence (1832-1922). [I will include his obituary in a separate article later, he is pictured above]; (7) Ann Spence (b. 1840); (8) Sarah Spence (b. 1842); (9) John Fletcher Spence (1843-1880); (10) Thomas Spence (1845-aft 1870). Thomas died in Jasper County, Missouri. John’s second wife was Elizabeth J. Gibson (1807-1860), whom he married April 6, 1848 in Adams County, Illinois.
h. Mark Spence (1812-1860). Mark was born August 11, 1812 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died after 1860 in Adams County, Illinois. I know nothing else about him.
i. Thornton Spence (1814-1880). Thornton was born September 5, 1814 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died after 1880 in Huntsville, Schuyler, Illinois. He lived in a number of places including Astoria, Fulton, Illinois (1850), Harnett, North Carolina (1860), Bidwell, Butte, California (1867-1879) and Huntsville, Schuyler, Illinois (1880), where he is listed on the census as a mechanic. I do not know whether he ever married.

4. Malachi Spence (1769-1847); m. Courtney Massa Hubbard (1779-1817). Malachi was born about 1769 in Pasquotank, North Carolina, and he died June 1, 1847 in Indian Grove, Livingston County, Illinois. An article titled “Indian Grove Settlement” found on Ancestry.com, notes:

Malachi Spence and his son, James Spence, and Richard Moore settled here
a year or two after those already mentioned. The latter was from Overton
County, Tenn., and the Spences and Darnalls from Kentucky. Mrs. Glenn
Phillips, a widow lady, came from the same neighborhood in Tennessee, and
about the same time that Richard Moore and the Spences came to the settlement.
This comprised the first batch of settlers in what is now Indian Grove
Township ; and some of them are still living on their original homesteads, while
those who have died or removed to other States have left honored representatives
behind them. Rev. John Darnall sold out some years ago and removed
to Oregon. Malachi Spence is dead, but a son lives at the old home. Mrs.
Phillips is also dead. Richard Moore and Barney Phillips are still living in the
township (13)

Similar to other Spence relatives, Malachi Spence moved around. He married his wife in Maryland about 1796. As previously noted, her father served in the Continental Army. He was a cabinet maker and made coffins for the Army (14). By 1810, they were in Madison County, Kentucky (15), and they remained in Madison County until 1840, when they appear in Livingston County, Illinois (16).

The children of Malachi and Courtney Massa Hubbard Spence follow:

(a) James Spence (1797-1881). James was born August 1, 1797 in Randolph County, North Carolina, and he died March 16, 1881 in Fairbury, Livingston County, Illinois. His wife was Susannah Callahan (1803-1879). Their children were: (1) Sarah Ann Spence (1820-1885); (2) Minerva Ann Spence (1821-1894); (3) Permelia Ann Spence (1823-1824); (4) Mary Ann Spence (1824-1901); (5) Malachi Spence (1826-1868); (6) Eliza Jane Spence (1828-1891); (7) John D. Spence (1830-1897); (8) Elizabeth Jane Spence (1831-1855); (9) Christian Gentry Spence (1832-1921); (10) Elcany B. Spence (1834-1911); (11) James Rayburn Spence (1835-1911); (12) Louvica Amanda Spence (1837-1925); (13) Cary Spence (1840-1889); (14) Susan Spence (1843-1865); (15) William J. Spence (1846-1869); (16) Cyrus Rastin Spence (1848-1934). James Spence married Susannah Callahan in Madison County, Kentucky May 4, 1819. They remained in Madison County until 1840, when James appears on the census for Livingston County.
(b) Lacada Sadie Spence (1798-1860). Lacada was born in 1798 in North Carolina, and she died in 1860 in Madison County, Kentucky. I have no further information.
(c) Mary Spence (1800-1850). Mary was born in Madison County, Kentucky in 1800, and she died in Kentucky in July 1850. Her husband was James Rayburn. Their son was John Rayburn, who was born in 1873.
(d) Rebecca Spence (1802-1889). Rebecca was born July 15, 1802 in Kentucky, and she died March 7, 1889 in Fairbury, Livingston County, Illinois. Her husband was Nathan Oldam (1805-1877).
(e) Keziah “Kezie” Spence (1805-1893). Keziah was born December 11, 1805 in Madison County, Kentucky, and she died August 11, 1893 in Oregon City, Clackamas, Oregon. Her husband was John Darnall (1804-1894). Their children were: (1) James William Darnall (1833-1884); (2) John Martin Darnall (1836-1863); (3) Nathan O. Darnall (1838-1898); (4) Nicholas H. Darnall (1841-1917); (5) Bruce Bundren Darnall (1843-1844); (6) Courtney Ann Darnall (1846-1926).
(f) Cary Spence (1811-1874). Cary was born June 15, 1811 in Madison County, Kentucky, and he died May 19, 1874 in Fairbury, Livingston, Illinois. His wife was Abigail Cunningham (1810-1852). Their children were: (1) Malachi A. Spence (1843-1910); (2) Apphia Spence (1843-1928); (3) Robert Spence (1845-1867); (4) Josiah Spence (1846-1924); (5) Isabelle Spence (1850-1938); (6) Absalom Abraham Spence (1852-1873).
(g) Sarah Spence (b. 1812). Sarah was born in Madison County, Kentucky, and she married Nathaniel Oldham (b. 1796). I know nothing else about her.
(h) Williamson D. Spence (1814-1896). Williamson was born July 12, 1814 in Madison County, Kentucky, and he died December 1, 1896 in Belle Prairie City, Livingston, Illinois. His wife was Mary Darnall (1820-1901). Their children were: (1) Courtney Ann Spence (1839-1920); (2) Amanda Melvina Spence (1841-1911); (3) Malachi Martin Spence (1844-1911); (4) Martin M. Spence (b. 1845); (5) Mary Emily Spence (1847-1921); (6) Marquis D. Spence (1856-1954).
(i) Lacada Esther Spence (1816-1832). Esther was born in Madison County, Kentucky in 1816, and she died in Livingston County, Illinois in 1832. She is buried in the Spence Cemetery, Fairbury, Livingston, Illinois.
(j) An infant daughter Spence (1817-1817). Madison County, Kentucky.

5. Esther Spence (b. 1770). Esther was born in North Carolina in 1770. I know nothing else about her.

6. Cary Spence (b. 1773); m. Abigail Powers. Cary was born in North Carolina in 1773, and he died in Randolph County after being kicked by a horse. The year of his death is unknown. His wife was Abigail Powers. Their children were: (1) Sarah Spence; (2) William Spence; (3) David Spence (1790-1851). I know nothing else about their children. David was born November 7, 1790, and he died December 2, 1851.

7. James Spence (1781-1828). James was born in North Carolina in 1781, and he died possibly in Madison County, Kentucky in 1828. I do not have any additional information about him.

James Spence of Randolph County, North Carolina and William Edward Spence (d. 1785) were the sons of James Spence (1702-1753) and Elizabeth Greaves (1707-1755) and were brothers. James Spence (1702-1753) was the son of James Spence (1674-1740) and his first wife, Esther Booth (1674-1715) (17) There are a number of men named James Spence in this family, something that has caused a great deal of confusion. After many painstaking hours, I think I have sorted them out!

References

(1) North Carolina State and Colonial Records, North Carolina State Library, Raleigh, North Carolina. Notes taken May 1998.
(2) International Genealogical Index (IGI). 1994 Edition. Date Accessed: 1998.
(3) Stuckey, Irma D. Darnall, Spence, Steers, Spangler, Stuckey, Sill and Brief Accounts of Families into which some members married. Henry IL: M & D Printing (1983).
(4) Beall, Barbara Inman, “Notes re: James Spence of Randolph County, North Carolina”. Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) North Carolina State and Colonial Records. North Carolina State Library, Raleigh, North Carolina. 1998.
(6) North Carolina Militia Roster (1766) for Pasquotank County. Copy obtained from the North Carolina Archives
(7) James Spence in North Carolina and Early Tennessee Land Records (1753-1931). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed: 20 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Lemuel Spence in the North Carolina Compiled Census and Census Substitutes List, Early Tax List 1767. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) Lemuel Spence in the North Carolina Compiled Census and Census Substitutes List, Early Tax List 1769. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Lemuel Spence in the North Carolina Compiled Census and Census Substitutes List, 1790 Census. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) Lemuel Spence in the North Carolina Compiled Census and census Substitutes List, Early Tax List 1795. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) Reeves, Henry and Mary Jo Davis Shoaf (Compilers). Davidson Co. North Carolina Will Summaries, Vol. I. Mrs. Mary Jo Davis Shoaf, Publisher, Lexington, North Carolina, 1979
(13) “Indian Grove Settlement about Malachi Spence,” Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(14) Stuckey, Erma D. Darnall, Spence, Steers, Spangler, Stuckey, Sill and Brief Accounts of families into which some members married. Henry, IL: M & D Printing (1983)
(15) 1810 Census for Malachi Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) 1840 Census for Malachi Spence, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015.
(17) Beall, Barbara Inman, “Notes re: James Spence of Randolph County, North Carolina”. Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

The Three Youngest Children of James and Elizabeth Greaves Spence

pasquotank_river

This article is devoted to the three youngest children of James Spence (1702-1753) and Elizabeth Greaves (1707-1755): Letisha Spence (1734-1786), David Spence (1735-1790), and Greaves Spence (1742-1803)

Letisha Spence (1734-1786)

Very little is known about Letisha Spence. She was born about 1734 and she died in 1786 in Pasquotank, North Carolina. She appears of record in District #6 of the North Carolina Compiled Census for 1786 (1) and on the North Carolina State Census for 1786 (2). She appears to have never married.

David Spence (1735-1790)

More information is available concerning David Spence, another son of James and Elizabeth Greaves Spence. For one thing, his plantation was adjacent to his oldest brother William. David was born about 1735 in Pasquotank, North Carolina, and he died there in 1790. He was married about 1754; however, his first wife’s name is unknown. They had two known sons, who later appear on Middle Tennessee records:

1. Lewis Spence (1775-1811). Lewis was born in Pasquotank, North Carolina about 1775, and he died after 1811 in Davidson County, Tennessee. He last appears on the Davidson County Tax Records for 1811 (3) and disappears from the records after that.
2. John David Spence (1776-bef 1830). John was born in Pasquotank, North Carolina about 1776, and he died before 1830 in Stewart County, Tennessee. He appears on the Stewart County 1810 Compiled Census record (4), and he last appears on the 1820 Census for Stewart County, Tennessee (5). His wife’s name is unknown, but he may have had a son named John Spence. Nothing else is known about his son or other children.

David Spence would later marry his brother, William’s widow. He will later reappear in the William Edward Spence article.

Greaves Spence (1742-1803)

I have already mentioned Greaves Spence in an earlier article about his grandson, William Spence (1795-1869) and the mystery surrounding him (6). So I will provide a brief outline here. Greaves was born in Pasquotank County about 1742, and he died in Camden County, North Carolina in 1803. His wife’s name was Elizabeth. The last record for her in Camden County is December 1, 1786, but her last child was born in 1803 (unless Greaves had two marriages.) The children of Greaves and Elizabeth Spence follow:

1. Edward Spence (1760-1802). Edward’s wife was Elizabeth Pearce (1765-1800). Their children were:

a. Penelope Spence
b. Rebecca Spence
c. Abner Spence (1786-1865)
d. Cary Spence (1792-1862)
e. Jordan Pearce Spence (1792-1868)
f. William Spence (1795-1869)
g. Mark Spence (1797-1865)
h. Amos Spence (1800-1845/50)

2. James Spence (1761-1828). James married Rhoda McBride (1761-1850). Their son was Almond Spence (1811-1822)
3. Mark Spence (1794-1822)
4. Noah Spence (1794-1822)
5. Rhoda Spence (b. 1803).

References

(1) North Carolina Compiled Census about Letisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed: 12 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) North Carolina State Census for 1786 about Letisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 12 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) Index to Early Tennessee Tax Records and copy of actual 1811 Davidson County, Tennessee Tax List. Obtained from the Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.
(4) Compiled Tennessee State Census Records about John David Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 12 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) 1820 Census about John David Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo. Utah. Date Accessed: 12 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) The Mystery of William Spence (1795-1869). Life With Barbara Blog, WordPress.com. Date Accessed: 12 Jan 2015. Available online at https://drbibeall43.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/the-mystery-of-william-spence-1795-1869/

James Spence (1702-1753) and Elizabeth Greaves/Graves (1707-1755)

pasquotank_river

My sixth-great grandfather, James Spence, was born about 1702 in Pasquotank, North Carolina. He was the youngest son of James Spence (1674-1740) and Esther Booth (1674-1715). In all likelihood, James had the same restless nature as his predecessors. His grandfather, David Spence, left Scotland for America and traveled back and forth between his original home in Northumberland County, Virginia and his final home in Somerset County, Maryland. His father, James Spence, David’s youngest son, traveled back and forth between North Carolina and Somerset County, Maryland. It appears as though these early Spences were constantly on the move. Young James was no exception.

When he was thirteen years old, James Spence’s mother (Esther Booth) died in 1715. His father married Sarah Elizabeth Truman (1673-1740). As noted in previous articles, she was a daughter of John Truman, who died in Somerset County, Maryland in 1686, and a sister of Dorothy Truman (1672-1734)—wife of Alexander Spence (1669-1735)—and Catherine (Cathron) Truman (1665-1726)—wife of John Spence (1672-1736). Sarah’s full name was Sarah Elizabeth Truman. She was known by her middle name when her father was alive. However, after his death in 1686 and after she moved into the John Booth household, she began using her first name Sarah. The Booths already had a daughter named Elizabeth or Eliza. By using her first name, Sarah avoided confusion. Sarah Elizabeth Truman and Esther Booth were raised together; to them, they were like sisters!

It is not known when Esther and Sarah moved to North Carolina. James Spence married Esther Booth about 1696. Their daughter Bridget was born in Somerset County, Maryland in 1698. James Spence was in Pasquotank with his two brothers by 1697. As suggested in an earlier article, he probably kept his family in Maryland, and traveled back and forth between North Carolina and Maryland until 1699 or 1700. By then, he moved his family to Pasquotank. His son, Alexander, was born in Pasquotank in 1700. And young James Spence, the subject here, was born in Pasquotank in 1702. Sarah Elizabeth became a close companion to Esther and when the James Spence family moved to North Carolina, Sarah moved along with them. James Spence continued traveling back and forth between the two colonies until his mother’s death in 1711, so he was absent much of the time. Young James grew up in a traveling environment and undoubtedly inherited that restless spirit.

The first reference to young James Spence is in his father’s will, per the following abstract:

“James Spence, Pasquotank Precinct, Will date: 20 Mar 1739; Probate: Oct 1740
Sons: Alexander, David and James. Daughters: Bridget Spence and Betty Mardrum. Wife and Executrix: Sarah. Witnesses: John Jones, Berd Banger, Elizabeth Perishe. Clerk of the Court: James Craven” (1)

[Note: Supposedly, James Spence, Sr. and his second wife Sarah Truman had a son named David Spence (1717-1775). As noted in an earlier article, I could find no information about this David. He either did not exist, or else he left the area early. They also appear to have had a daughter named Sarah Spence (1721-1739. She would have died before her father drew up his will.]

It is unknown when young James Spence traveled up through Virginia. He may have known family members who lived in the area. One of his jaunts took him to Spotsylvania County where the Greaves family lived, and where young James met his future wife: Elizabeth Greaves.

The Greaves Family

My encounter with the Greaves family has taken me on a wild escapade of my own. No one knew anything about her beyond her name Elizabeth, her approximate year of birth—1707—and her death which occurred after February 3, 1755. One Ancestry member suggested her father’s name was James Greaves. His name appeared on the Ancestry chart as just a name with no dates or locations. While checking available records, I found a James Greaves in Pasquotank County, North Carolina, but he lived there in 1769—long after the deaths of James Spence and Elizabeth Greaves. He may have been a family member, but he was not Elizabeth’s father. My discovery led me back to the drawing board once again.

So where did this Greaves family originate?

My search took me away from Ancestry to other search engines. And when I typed in the phrase Colonial Greaves Family of North Carolina, I made a remarkable discovery. One branch of the Greaves family later settled in Randolph County, North Carolina—the same location where a son of James and Elizabeth Greaves Spence also settled and about the same period of time! That discovery also led me to discovery of other Greaves family members in various North Carolina locations—all with apparent ties to a Spotsylvania, Virginia family headed by John Greaves/Graves, Sr. (1665-1747)

The John Greaves/Graves story is interesting. For a long time, researchers presumed John was a son of Capt. Thomas Greaves and Mary Perrin of Jamestown. All of that proved not to be true when DNA testing showed there was no connection. According to Gravesfa.org:

“John Graves Sr/Greaves (1) was born about 1665 and died after 1737. His wife’s name is not known. He had 3 sons including John Graves Jr b 1685 (married to Frances), Thomas (above) born 1691, and Joseph Graves b 1715. It is believed that he was an immigrant to Virginia from Northamptonshire, England (based on DNA testing, and the Bible record of Solomon Graves in the Appendix), and his surname may have been spelled Greaves in England (since all other proven relatives of his in England spelled their name as Greaves)” (2)

An abstract of John Greaves’ will follows:

“GRAVES, JOHN, St. George’s Parish, d. Mar. 30, 1747, p. June 2, 1747. Wit. Joseph Holloday, Benjamin Holloday, B. Lewis, William Webb. Ex. wife Susanna, Joseph Peterson, John Wigglesworth. Leg. wife Susanna, 140 acres of land which I had of Nicholas Randolph; son Thomas Graves, 140 acrss of land next his brother Edward; daughter Rebecca, 140 acrss of land next her brother Thomas; son Isaac, 140 acres of land next his sister Rebecca; son John, 140 acrss of land next his brother Isaac; daughter Jemima, 140 acres of land next her brother John. (Page 444)” (3)

In the records I have seen, John had one wife, identified as Susanna in his will. Some people call her Rebecca Susanna. Others believe she was Rebecca Susanna Harwood while others refer to her as Rebecca Susanna Dickens. Still others combine these names: Rebecca Susanna Harwood Dickens, some even adding the name Virginia! Susanna is the only name I can verify at this point. I do not know how the other names came into being.

The children identified in John’s will are Thomas, Edward, Rebecca, Isaac, Jemima and John. Elizabeth’s name is not mentioned. On the other hand, other records indicate he had a daughter named Elizabeth. This discovery led me to another problem. Some people believe John’s Elizabeth was born in 1697, died in 1729, and married Edward Randolph I in London in 1718. This belief was probably stimulated by the reference in John’s will to a tract of land he acquired from Nicholas Randolph. After further research, I have concluded that this Elizabeth is not the daughter of John Greaves. Elizabeth (Randolph) was born about 1697 in Bristol, Somerset, England. She married Edward Randolph in London, England December 15, 1718, and she died in Henrico County, Virginia about 1729. The Millennium File at Ancestry.com identifies her as Elizabeth Grosvenor, born 1688 in Bristol, England (4). No parents are identified, although some people believe her father’s name was Edward Grosvenor.

So who was Elizabeth Greaves?

Based upon available records, the children of John Greaves/Graves and his wife Susanna follow:
1. John Greaves/Graves, Jr. (1685-1757). John is presumed to have been John and Susanna’s oldest child. He had two marriages. His first wife was Hannah Smith (1690-1719) and his second wife was Frances Coleman (1702-1765), by whom he had his children. Their children were:
a. Ann Graves (1719-1798)
b. Elizabeth “Betty” Graves (1720-1826)
c. James Graves (1722-1781)
d. Thomas Graves (1724-1792)
e. John Graves (1725-1798)
f. Joseph Thomas Graves (1725-1785)
g. Frances Ann Graves (1742-1820)
2. Thomas Greaves/Graves (1691-1767). Thomas also had two marriages. His first wife was Mary Perkins (1692-1720). Their children were:
a. Eleanor Graves (1713-1777)
b. John Graves (1715-1792)
c. Louisa Graves (b. 1717)
d. Mary Graves (b. 1718)
His second wife was Ann Davenport (1696-1782). Their children were:
a. Thomas Graves (1721-1801)
b. Solomon Graves (1723-1785)
c. Capt. William Graves (1724-1790)
d. Richard Graves (1725-1788)
e. Rice Graves (1729-1814)
f. David Graves (1730-1808)
g. Susannah Graves (1730-1802)
h. Katherine Graves (1731-1772)
i. Robert Graves (1733-1771)
j. Nancy Catherine Graves (1734-1809)
k. ROSANNA GRAVES (1735-1782). Rosanna is an important connection and supports my argument about Elizabeth Greaves. Rosanna married John Spencer (1732-1789). Their son was Sharp Spencer (1770-1834). Sharp was born in Albemarle County, Virginia, and he died in Putnam County, Indiana. He had two wives: Margaret Elizabeth Crenshaw (1772-1809) and Jenny Trigger Crady (1790-1844). Their son, William Spencer (1817-1888), later moved to Jasper County, Missouri, where he became associated with the sons of my third great grandfather, Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859)—Samuel, a direct descendant of James Spence and Elizabeth Greaves of this study. I had always believed there was a family connection somewhere concerning William Spencer, but could not find it until now. (There are two earlier articles about William Spencer on my website: “Who Killed John Bass Jones: Part One” (5) and “Who Killed John Bass Jones: Part Two—The Odyssey of Mrs. Ady” (6).
l. Catherine Graves (1737-1830). [I’m not certain whether she is another daughter named Catherine or whether this is an error. More research is needed.]
3. Edward Graves (1693-1763). No additional information
4. Jemima Graves (1699-1764). No additional information
5. Rebecca Graves (1702-1814). No additional information
6. Robert Graves (b. 1702). No additional information. Rebecca’s twin.
7. Isaac Graves (1705-1790). No additional information.
8. ELIZABETH GRAVES (1707-1755). The subject under discussion here.
9. Mary Graves (b. 1707). Elizabeth’s twin who did not survive.
10. Joseph Graves (1715-1774). Joseph relocated to North Carolina. He probably settled first in Rowan County. That part of Rowan later became Surry County. Joseph’s wife was Sarah Bunyard (1721-1774). They had one daughter—Mary Graves (1738-1800). Her husband was Col. Benjamin Cleveland (1738-1806) of Revolutionary War fame.

The three sons specifically tied to John Greaves/Graves through DNA testing are John Graves, Thomas Graves and Joseph Graves (7).

So, what about Elizabeth?

When I first became aware of Elizabeth Greaves, I was reluctant to include her on my tree as a child of John Greaves/Graves and his wife Susanna. Finally, I decided to include her. After all, I would receive no DNA matches if she was not his daughter. On the other hand, I would receive a DNA confirmation if the relationship was correct.

That evening, I received my first confirmation.

Since then, I’ve had at least a dozen matches with John Greaves/Graves as the common ancestor. The confirmations extend from John through three of his sons: John, Thomas and Joseph down to the sender on the one hand and from John through Elizabeth down through my Spence line to me on the other! In addition to all of this, the names William, Edward, and Robert were Greaves/Graves names. They frequently appear among James Spence and Elizabeth Greaves’ descendants. John Greaves’ father’s name has been suggested as William. That would explain the origin of the name.

I am satisfied that Elizabeth Greaves (wife of James Spence) was John Greaves/Graves’ Elizabeth!

James Spence and Elizabeth Greaves were married in Virginia about 1721. They left for Pasquotank shortly after the wedding. No doubt John and Susanna sent them off with their blessing and with Susanna’s portion of her inheritance. This would explain why Elizabeth is not mentioned in her father’s will.

The children of James Spence and Elizabeth Greaves follow:
1. William Edward Spence (1722-1785). [My fifth great grandfather]

2. Isaac Spence (1722-1806)–William’s twin. For an update on him, click HERE
3. James Spence (1730-1804)
4. Letisha Spence (1734-1786)
5. David Spence (1735-1790)
6. Greaves Spence (1742-1803)

I will be writing individual articles about William and James. Letisha, David and Greaves will be combined in a separate article. [Note: Isaac Spence was discovered September 2015. For Isaac’s update, click HERE.]

References
(1) North Carolina Will Abstracts, 1660-1790, about James Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(2) John Graves of Spotsylvania County, Virginia. Originally posted at Gravesa.org. Copy posted at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed: 6 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(3) John Graves Will Abstract, Virginia County Records Spotsylvania County 1721-1800
Wills, Will Book A 1722-1749 page 8. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed: 6 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(4) Millennium File about Elizabeth Grosvenor (b. 1688). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed: 6 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(5) “Who Killed John Bass Jones, Part One.” Historical Footprints 2010 website. Story written 2010. Date accessed: 3 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.historical-footprints-2010.com/john_bass_jones_1.html
(6) “Who Killed John Bass Jones, Part Two.” Historical Footprints 2010 website. Story written 2010. Date accessed: 3 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.historical-footprints-2010.com/ady_odyssey.html
(7) John Graves/Greaves of Northamptonshire, England. Original website address: http://www.gravesfa.org/gen270.htm. Copy at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date accessed: 6 Jan 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com