Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Fourteen: Two Rhodas and a James–Part Two

Replica of meeting house, Clear Fork Baptist Church Cemetery, Monticello, Kentucky. Photo shared on Ancestry.com by Carlinbrooks 16 Feb 2013.

Replica of meeting house, Clear Fork Baptist Church Cemetery, Monticello, Kentucky. Photo shared on Ancestry.com by Carlinbrooks 16 Feb 2013.

In 1798, Rev. Isaac Denton, Jr. was the first preacher to enter this Transmontane Wilderness . He became a distinguished, prolific, pioneer preacher and leader in South Central Ky. and North Central Tenn. He established the first churches and first school in the frontier territory. He was Clear Fork Baptist Church’s founder and first pastor until his death in 1848. He ministered in Ky. and Tenn. for over 55 years. He and his 3 sons preached a total of about 175 years(1)

***

No, he wasn’t an orphan–but he was raised by another family!

Not only did I find the family who raised James W. Denton, but I also found his real family!

 

Thomas J. Denton (1781-1833) and Francis Boring (1790-1870)

James W. Denton was the oldest son of Thomas J. Denton.  Thomas was born in Tennessee in 1781, and he died in Cocke County in 1833. The known children of Thomas J. Denton and Frances Boring (1790-1870) follow:

  1. Joseph Jefferson Denton (1810-1887). Joseph was born March 10, 1810 in Washington County, Tennessee, and he died September 9, 1887 in Cocke County, Tennessee. His wife was Charity Huff (b. 1816). They had a daughter: Margaret Denton (1841-1920).
  2. William Addison Denton (b. 1812, Washington County, Tennessee). William died in Cocke County. His wife’s name was Mary (1820-1861). They had a daughter named Frances “Fannie” E. Denton (1861-1949), who married a Hux.  William last appears on the 1880 Census for Cocke County. He is buried in the A. J. Denton Family Cemetery.
  3. Temperance Francis Denton (1815-1878). Temperance was born in Washington County, Tennessee in 1815, and she died May 30, 1878 in Cooke County, Texas. She had two husbands: John Murrell, about whom nothing is known and Henry Jackson Click, Jr., by whom she had a daughter: Mary Jane Click. In 1870, Temperance appears on the Census for Perry County, Tennessee(2). This is a connection to Perry County that I had been seeking given the fact that Samuel and Daniel Spence and Milly Catherine Spence Jones had lived there prior to their departure for Missouri. Temperance appears on the Perry County census records for 1850 and 1860 in the Samuel Denton household. (I will get to Samuel momentarily).
  4. John B. Denton (1816-1901). John was born in November 1816 in Washington County, Tennessee, and he died in Cocke County in 1901. His wife was Mary Wilson (1828-1894). They had three children: (a) James Anderson Denton (1854-1929); (b) Frances M. Denton (b. 1856); and Thomas J. Denton. Nothing else is known about Thomas.
  5. Sarah A. Denton (1818-1892). Sarah was born February 20, 1818 in Cocke County, Tennessee, and she died December 20, 1892 in Giles County, Tennessee. Her husband was Calvin Allen (1813-1870). Their children were: (a) William A. Allen, born 1836; (b) George William Allen (b) George William Allen (1839-1908); (c) Temperance Allen, born 1842; (d) George Thomas Allen (1842-1916); (e) Morris Calvin Allen (1845-1910); (f) Hiram Allen, b. 1848; (g) Louisa Allen, b. 1852; (h) Houston Allen, born 1856; (i) Rufus J. Allen (1858-1917); (j) Martha Allen (1859-1896); (k) Lewis Allen (1862-1950); (l) John Morgan Allen (1865-1946).
  6. Louisa Denton (1830-1920). Louisa was probably by Thomas J. Denton’s second wife Elizabeth. He married her October 31, 1822 in Cocke County, Tennessee(3). His first wife, Francis Boring, was still alive, so they may have divorced. Louisa was born October 1, 1830 in Washington County, Tennessee, and she died January 23, 1920 in Cocke County, Tennessee. Her husband was Houston Sisk, whowas born in 1827. Their children were: (a) James Sisk, born 1866, and (b) Dora Madeline Sisk, born 1872.

One reason why James W. Denton would be raised by another family centers upon his mother’s health after his birth. She was only sixteen when he was born, and James was her first child. He would have been born in Washington County, Tennessee in 1806–the exact month and day of his birth is unknown. Enter the Rev. Isaac Denton!

 

Rev. Isaac Denton (1768-1848) and Martha Patsy Crouch (1772-1848)

Isaac Denton was born September 1768 in Orange County, North Carolina, and he died January 26, 1848 in Clinton County, Kentucky. His wife was Martha Patsy Crouch, who was born June 3, 1772 in Henry County, Virginia, and who died in Clinton County, Kentucky. They are buried in the Clear Creek Baptist Church Cemetery, Clinton County, Kentucky.

Isaac Denton and Thomas J. Denton were related; their progenitors coming from New York. They both claim direct descent from Samuel Denton (1631-1713) and Mary Rock Smith (1640-1715) on the Denton line, and from William Odell (1634-1697) and Sara Vowels (1649-1697) on the Odell line.

Isaac Denton’s parents were Isaac Denton (1733-1797) and Ann Whitson (1733-1771), and his grandparents were Capt. Abraham John Denton II (1700-1774) and Mary Odell (1702-1774).  According to information submitted to Ancestry.com by rmsmith1971:

It is believed that Abraham, who was called “Captain” was a part of the militia used in defense of the settlers. He was also referred to as Doctor when living on his plantation in the Shenandoah Valley.

“Abraham, according to sources in Orange CO, NY, had some problems with local law and soon after left the county for a new home in the Shenandoah County of Virginia. This was in 1729 or 1730. Thus started the move westward, for his sons each moved in different directions into the frontier.”

Abraham’s will was written August 20, 1774 and probated September 27, 1774 in Shenandoah CO, VA. “in the County of Dunmore, Colony of Virginia, being very sick and weak in body but perfect mind and memory. First leaving my loving kind and true wife Mary Denton and William Reno Executors. I therefore will and bequesth my loving kind and true wife Mary Denton the lower part of my land and plantation during her lifetime also the legal thirds of the moveable estate. Also Ii give my well beloved son Abraham Denton my wearing clothes: two pr. boots, two coats, two vestcoats and one pr of breatches and as he has received his part of the land, I give unto him five pounds current money of Virginia to be paid to him out of my two daughters, Phebee Plumley and Martha Moore their parts of the moveable estate and the land after my wife Mary Decrees the tract of land to be equally divided between them both that is to say Phebe Plumley and Martha Moore.” Signed Abraham Denton, Senr. Witnesses: Mary Little, Dorothy (X) Clock, Elizabeth Smith, Mary Peerceson.

From The Tennessee Valley Historical Review: “Abraham Denton, Junior, became involved with the law in New York in about 1729-30. He, along with some close relatives, left that state and headed for Virginia, crossing the eastern part of Pennsylvania and the Northwestern part of Maryland. In the Valley of Virginia, then Orange County (later Augusta County) and the upper Virginia Valley, (Frederick, later Dunmore, and still later Shenandoah County) we find Abraham and his family. Also about the same time, Jonas Denton and others had reached the Virginia country. Samuel, Robert, James and John Denton begin to appear in the same general locality. The deeds in Frederick County clearly prove that the Dentons
were there as early as 1755 and became prominent citizens.”

Abraham left a deed dated August 12, 1774 which was signed by Mary Denton Little. Dorothy Clock (Clark) Elizabeth Smith and Mary Pareson (Pearson) made their marks. By this information, Mary Little was still living in 1774 and had enough education to sign her name. Abraham was a Captain in the French and Indian War in the Provincial Army
of 1766.

As the older generation died off, the younger ones became less rooted in the old lands and soon started departing for the southwest(4).

Isaac Denton Sr. was born in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, and he died in Washington County, Tennessee in May 1795. The following is from his Find-a-Grave Memorial:

Birth: 1733
Shenandoah County
Virginia, USA
Death: May, 1795
Washington County
Tennessee, USA

Son of Abraham John Denton and Mary Sarah O’Dell.
Married Ann Whitson about 1765.He is listed as DAR #A132656 for patriotic service during the Revolutionary War.Isaac left his will in Washington CO, TN, Will Book Vol. 1, p. 34, 35. dated July 14, 1794 which lists his beneficiaries as wife Anna and children Isaac, Jeremiah, Martha, Agnes and Elizabeth.Burial is unknown.Family links:
Parents:
Abraham John Denton (1700 – 1774)
Mary O’Dell Denton (1702 – 1774)Spouse:
Ann Whitson Denton (1745 – 1802)Children:
Isaac Denton (1768 – 1848)*
Agnes Denton Crouch (1770 – 1836)*Siblings:
Abraham Denton (1726 – 1827)*
Isaac Denton (1733 – 1795)
Phoebe Denton Plumlee (1737 – 1779)***Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling
Burial:
Unknown
Created by: treesandleaves
Record added: Apr 30, 2015
Find A Grave Memorial# 145845320(5)

The Rev. Isaac Denton was born in Orange County, North Carolina in September 1768, and he died January 26, 1848 in Clinton County, Kentucky. His wife was Martha Patsy Crouch (1772-1848). Their known children follow:

  1. Anna Denton (1804-1849). Anna was born September 14, 1804 in Cumberland, Kentucky, and she died September 29, 1849 in Moddyville, Kentucky. Her husband was Charles Reagan (1799-1879). Their daughter was Emeline Clemanza Reagan (1832-1862).
  2. Isaac Denton (1806-1893). Isaac was born December 23, 1806 in White County, Tennessee or in Clinton County, Kentucky, and he died August 23, 1893 in McMinnville, Warren, Tennessee. His first wife was Rutha Walling (1809-1840). Their children were: (a) Susannah Denton (1832-1833); (b) Emaline Denton (1834-1859); (c) Isaac Denton (1837-1866); (d) Ozias D. Denton (1838-1876); (e) George W. Denton (1840-1871). His second wife was Mary Polly Greer (1812-1883). Their children were: (a) Isaac Denton (1836)–he may be the Isaac Denton from the first marriage; (b) Sarah Ann Denton (1842-1860); (c) Ruthie Denton (1845-1873); (d) James Mordica Denton (1850-1911); (e) Joseph Evander Denton (1853-1854). I will list them here, but I do not know whether they are children of these two marriages, or foster children: (a) Phoebe Denton (1827-1855); (b) Martha Denton (1829-1855); (c) Nancy Denton (1830-1858); (d) James W. Denton (1835-1844)–he may have been named after James W. Denton–the subject matter here; (e) Shelby Walling (1844-1925)–she would have been from Ruth’s line but not her daughter; (f) Mary Denton (1847-1864).
  3. Tabitha Harriett Denton (1808-1858) Tabitha was born in 1808 in Gainesboro, Jackson, Tennessee, and she died in 1858 in Arkansas City, Arkansas. Her husband was William Proctor Welch, who was born in 1804. Their son was Turner Goodall Welch (1840-1915).
  4. George Nolan Denton (1809-1890). George was born January 31, 1809 in Clinton County, Kentucky, and he died December 27, 1890 in Lamar, Texas. His first wife was Martha “Patsey” Robinson (1808-1867). Their children were: (a) Isaac Robinson Denton (1830-1856); (b) John J. Denton, born 1838; (c) James A. Denton, born 1841; (d) Lucille Denton, born 1843; (e) George Alfred Denton (1846-1916); (f) Robert O. Denton, born 1848; (g) Cassan A. Denton, born 1849; (h) Charles R. Denton, born 1851; (i) Martha L. Denton. His second wife was Sarah Sallie R. Parrish (1806-1884).
  5. Rev. Joseph Crouch Denton (1811-1887). Joseph was born May 5, 1811 in Cumberland, Kentucky, and he died September 29, 1887 in Clinton, Kentucky. His wife was Mary “Polly” Long (1811-1901). Their children were: (a) Solloman L. Denton (1833-1836); (b) Elizabeth Denton, born 1836; (c) William L. Denton (1837-1908); (d) Samuel L. Denton (1842-1859); (e) Matilda L. Denton, born 1849; (f) Mary Denton, born 1850.
  6. Phoebe Denton, born 1811 in Kentucky
  7. Jeremiah Denton, born 1815 in Kentucky.

 

Another Cousin Connection: James W. Denton (1806-1860) and Samuel Denton (1801-1860)

Samuel Denton was born in White County, Tennessee in 1801, and he died in 1860 at Cedar Creek, Perry County, Tennessee. This is the primary Denton connection to Perry County, Tennessee. Samuel and James W. Denton would travel there together. On January 12, 1828, Samuel married Argent Coleman (1802-1860) at Cedar Creek, Perry County, Tennessee. Their children were: (a) Nancy Denton (1823-1850); (b) Sarah Sally Denton (1832-1906); (c) John F. Denton (1833-1861); (d) Benjamin Franklin Denton (1833-1861); (e) Mary Elizabeth Denton (1839-1927). He was another distant cousin in the Denton-Odell line!

Samuel’s father was Benjamin Denton, Jr. who was born in 1733 in Granville, South Carolina and who died in 1848 in Tennessee. His mother was Margaret Peggy Ann Anderson (1774-1840). His grandparents were  Benjamin Denton, Sr. (1750-1810), who was born in Granville, North Carolina, and who died in 1810 in White County, Tennessee, and Priscilla Celia Rebecca Wiggins (1755-1808); his great grandparents were Samuel Denton, who was born in1 734 in Orange, New York and who died in 1811 in Pendleton District, South Carolina, and Margaret Moore (1714-1781). And his great-great grandparents were Capt. Abraham John Denton II and Mary Odell (1702-1774), who have already been discussed! These Dentons were all distant cousins!

I’ve already recounted some of James W. Denton’s activities in the Part One of this article. While he went to live with the Rev. Isaac Denton as an infant, he apparently maintained contact with his real family. In the end, he probably spent as much time with them as he did with the Isaac Denton family.

In July 1826, the Thomas J. Denton family was plagued with a partition action filed by Thomas’s brother, Samuel Denton (b. 1800), per the following newspaper notice:

State of Tennessee, Cocke County; May Sessions, 1826

Samuel Denton vs. Jonathan Denton, Jonas Denton, Thomas Denton and David Denton

PETITION FOR PARTITION

Samuel Denton filed his petition in open court, for partition of the lands therein described, and prays the court to make an order of publication, Wherefore, it is ordered that publication be made in the Knoxville Enquirer, three successive times, that he will present said petition at next term of this court, in order to have the prayer if the same granted, it appearing to the satisfaction of said Court that David Denton, one of the Defendants, resides in the State of Alabama.  W. GARRETT, July 12, 1826(6).

The partition action involved the division and settlement of lands in their father’s estate. By now, his distant cousin, Samuel Denton (1801-1860) had returned from Perry County, Tennessee for a short visit. Perry County had been recently established, per the following:

Perry County was formed in 1819 from parts of Humphreys and Hickman counties. It is named in honor of Oliver Hazard Perry  (1785–1819), American War of 1812 naval officer who, after his flagship was severely damaged, continued the fight from another ship and forced the surrender of the British fleet at the Battle of Lake Erie. Decatur County was formed from the portions of Perry County west of the Tennessee River. The first settlements in the county were along Toms Creek near the Tennessee River, with the first known birth in the area occurring in 1818. This is the first written date involving the area that would become Perry County, but it is evident that the area had some European permanent settlement prior to this. The seat of government and courts were originally located in a small town known as Harrisburg approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) south of the current seat of Linden. The county seat was transferred to its current location in Linden in 1848, where the current courthouse stands today. Harrisburg no longer exists as a municipal entity or recognized location(7).

James needed no further encouragement. He was looking for a place to go. The Rev. Isaac Denton family were fully settled in Kentucky and had been there for some time. He really didn’t want to go to Kentucky since he preferred Tennessee. So he returned to Perry County with his cousin, Samuel, and settled in with them for a short time. He met the Samuel Spence, Daniel Spence, Lewis and Milly Catherine Spence Jones, and it wasn’t long before he relocated to Davidson County, where he met the Elisha Spence family. And as noted in Part One, he met two Rhodas in the family. The rest is history.

So what happened to the children of the two Rhodas?

The Children by Rhoda Louisa Spence

As noted above, James W. Denton married Rhoda Louisa Spence on May 10, 1831 in Davidson County, Tennessee(8). They were divorced in 1837 or 1838. Four children were born of the marriage: two boys and two girls. Rhoda kept the girls with her and James kept the boys with him. Rhoda married Michael D. Gill while James married Rhoda’s sister, Susan Rhoda Spence. The Gill family moved to Missouri while the Dentons remained in Williamson County, Tennessee. I covered the Gill family extensively in Part One, but I will present the information I have on the Dentons here.

  1. Thomas J. Denton (1832-1862). Thomas was born in 1832 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He died in combat at Murfreesboro December 31, 1862. Thomas appeared on the 1860 Census for Union, St. Francis, Arkansas(9). However, when the War broke out, he returned to Tennessee and joined the Confederate Army. His name appears on the U.S. Confederate Army Casualty Lists and Reports, 1861-1865(10). He was named for James Denton’s biological father.
  2. Elizabeth Jane Denton (1832-1911). I have no update, but will include her information. She was named Elizabeth for Rhoda Louisa’s sister who died in North Carolina and Jane for Rhoda’s stepmother. She was born January 24, 1832 in Williamson County, Tennessee. I stated in Part One that if these birth dates are correct, Elizabeth Jane and Thomas J. were twins. She married James Mattison Buckingham (1823-1904) on March 27, 1852 in Williamson County, Tennessee(11). They had one daughter: Milly A. Buckingham (1864-1938). The Buckinghams moved to Missouri with the Gills. They first settled in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri. By 1900 they were in Benton, Newton County, Missouri.
  3. William H. Denton (1833-aft 1887). William was born in Williamson County, Tennessee in 1833, and he died after 1887 in Williamson County. On December 22, 1859, he married Sarah V. Boyd (1832-aft 1920) in Williamson County, Tennessee(12). They had a son whose name is not known. William also joined the Confederate Army. He served with the M. 2. Tennessee Cavalry. In 1864, William filed for divorce(13). They must have remarried because on November 22, 1920, Sophia filed for her widow’s pension(14). William was declared an invalid on August 17, 1887. I could find nothing further about him after that date.
  4. Milly Ann Denton (1833-bef 1860). Milly Ann was born March 16, 1833 (another set of twins if the birth dates are correct) and she died bef. 1860 in Clinton County, Kentucky. Apparently she didn’t want to move to Missouri. On October 14, 1852, she married Williamson Alexander in Dickson County, Tennessee(15). They may have eloped. Both of them do not appear on records for 1860. They may have moved to Clinton, Tennessee where a number of Milly’s Denton relatives and Williamson’s Alexander relatives were living. They may have died while traveling there, and they may have been the victims of foul play. The Dickson County marriage record plainly shows Milly’s name as Milly Ann Denton, but the recording notation on the side of the document identifies her as Milly Ann Dayton. I am inclined to believe the actual marriage license.

 

The Children of Susan Roden/Rhoda Spence

This is from the 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee–the one and only record fort his family(16).

  1. Samuel Denton, born 1838 in Williamson County, Tennessee and he died before 1860 in Williamson County. He was named for Samuel Denton (1801-1860)–James’ cousin who lived in Perry County– and for Susan’s oldest brother–Samuel Perry Spence. Samuel may have died young. I could find nothing else about him.
  2. Isaac Denton (1841-bef. 1860). Isaac was named for James Denton’s benefactor–the Rev. Isaac Denton. I believe that he also died before 1860. I could find nothing else about him.
  3. Abner Denton (1845-bef 1860). Abner was a Spence and a Denton name. I could find nothing else about him and believe he also died before 1860.
  4. Susan Denton (1846-bef 1860). Named for her mother. I could find nothing else about her.
  5. James W. Denton, Jr. (1849-aft. 1880). James was named for his father. I could find nothing else about him.

So what happened to this family, including James and Susan?

James was a farmer and worked in agriculture. I have a feeling that James, Susan and all five of their children suffered the same fate as Michael D. Gill and Rhoda Louisa Spence by being struck by an epidemic. I think they were all victims of some type catastrophe and died within a few days, weeks or months of each other.  According to the Tennessee Timeline on Rootsweb, a number of catastrophes took place in Tennessee during this timeframe:

June 1850 Cholera epidemic
Apr 29 1852 Earthquake- VA, NC, and TN
Aug 28-30 1852 TN river flood
1854 Cholera Epidemic (17)

The Timeline notes additionally:

The great Cholera epidemic was spread by immigrants from Europe. The major years were 1832, 1849, 1866, and 1873. By 1890, the disease was practically controlled. –Malaria was also of epidemic proportions in the late 1800’s. The hottest summer on record was 1886, and later 1887. Mosquitoes were out of control in the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys, as well as tributaries. This went on for years. –TB was also of epidemic proportions at the time. Children ages 5-15 rarely died from the “adult” epidemics, as this is a period of “Natural Immunity.” (18)

The Timeline further notes:

In case you ever wondered why a large number of your ancestors disappeared during a certain period in history, this might help. Epidemics have always had a great influence on people – and thus influencing, as well, the genealogists trying to trace them. Many cases of people disappearing from records can be traced to dying during an epidemic or moving away from the affected area. Some of the major epidemics in the United States are listed below: 

1850    Nationwide             Yellow Fever

1850 July 17    Gainesboro, TN             Cholera

1850-1    North America Influenza

1851 Coles Co., IL, The Great Plains, and Missouri   Cholera
1852 Nationwide [New Orleans-8,000 die in summer]Yellow Fever

1854 Tennessee, Giles County              unknown epidemic

1855    Nationwide [many parts] Yellow Fever

1857-9 Worldwide [one of the greatest epidemics]  Influenza

1860-1    Pennsylvania  Smallpox

1862     Tennessee, Shelby County, Memphis Yellow-fever(19)

***

Thus completes the story of Elisha Spence and Susanna Spencer and the lives of their children and some of their grandchildren and other descendants.

I have one more article to write in this series which will focus on Elisha’s second marriage to Jane Bell. There were four children of that marriage. My information is limited, so they will be covered in the last article. Then I will write a Conclusion and move on from there.

 

References

(1) Rev. Isaac Denton, Jr. Gravestone Inscription, Clear Fork Baptist Church Cemetery, Monticello, Kentucky. Find-a-Grave.com. Shared by Carlinbrooks 16 Feb 2013 on Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2) 1870 Census for Perry County, Tennessee for Temperance Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Thomas J. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) Information about Capt. Abraham Denton, Jr., submitted by rmsmith1971 10 Jul 2012, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Isaac Denton Find-a-Grave Memorial No. 145845320. Index at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(6) Samuel Denton Partition Action, May-July 1826 from the Knoxville, Gazette. Posted on Ancestry.com by Lucinda Copeland 10 Jun 2014. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7) “Perry County, Tennessee” From the Wikipedia Site. Modified  29 Aug 2015. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perry_County,_Tennessee

(8) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James Denton and Rhoda Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(9) 1860 Census for Union, St. Francis, Arkansas showing Thomas J. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) U.S. Confederate Army Casualty Lists and Reports, 1861-1865 for Thomas J. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James Mattison Buckingham and Elizabeth Jane Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) Tennessee State Marriage Records for William H. Denton and Sophia V. Boyd. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) Tennessee Divorce and Other Records, 1800-1965 about William H. Denton and Sophia V. Boyd. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934 about William H. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) Tennessee Divorce and Other Records, 1800-1965 about Williamson Alexander and Milly Ann Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16) 1850 Census for the James W. Denton Family, Williamson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(17) Historic Timeline of Tennessee. Rootsweb.com Website. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnmcmin2/tennesseetimeline.html

(19) Historic Timeline of Tennessee. Rootsweb.com Website. Date Accessed: 21 Sep 2015. Available online at http://rootsweb.ancestry.com/~tnmcmin2/tennesseetimeline.html

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Thirteen: Two Rhodas and a James–Part One

 

 

Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Taken May 2001

Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Taken May 2001

 

 

He must have been a wonder!

That’s what I thought while sorting through the James W. Denton-Rhoda Louisa Spence-Susan Roden/Rhoda Spence Triangle!  Fortunately, the situation did not turn out what it originally promised to be. Perhaps discovering two sisters bearing the name of Rhoda sparked his initial interest.

Rhoda Louisa Spence and Susan Rhoda Spence were the youngest daughters of Elisha Spence and Susanna. Rhoda Louisa was the twin of William Spence of Weakley County. As noted in the previous article, the twins were born in Randolph County, North Carolina or in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina March 28, 1809. Some people think they were born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. That is a possibility since Elisha Spence moved around quite a bit. Then in early 1810, the family set out for Davidson County, Tennessee, where Susan was born in late September. In 1830, the Elisha Spence family still resided in Davidson County, but by the early 1830s, they moved to the western part of the state. The older children were still living in Perry County; Levi returned from North Carolina and settled in Madison County. Elisha moved his family to Madison.

By 1830, however, Rhoda Louisa and Susan Rhoda were on their own and both had their eyes set on marriage.

Enter one James W. Denton who had an eye for the young Rhodas.

According to the one and only census record I located for him, he was born in Tennessee in 1806(1). I have no idea where he originated or who his parents were. A number of Denton families resided in the area, but James doesn’t appear to match any of them. A James W. Denton died in 1861 in Smith County, Tennessee(2), but that individual appears to have been born about 1846. Another James W. Denton married a Sophia Shaw in Williamson County in 1829(3), but he wasn’t this James W. Denton. That James W. Denton remained married to Sophia. And then there was another James W. Denton in Maury County who married there and raised a family. He died in 1880 at the age of 85(4). He was not this James W. Denton either! And there was a large family of Dentons in Perry County, Tennessee. I could not find a link there either, however. He may have come from Eastern Tennessee since a large group of Dentons resided there as well.

Several things may have happened to James. He may have struck out on his own at an early age. He may have been orphaned.  And there is the possibility that James W. Denton was not his real name!

At any rate, with the Elisha Spence family moving to Madison County, Tennessee and the two Rhodas remaining in Williamson County, James had free reign of the situation. According to Tennessee Marriage Records, on May 10, 1831, James W. Denton married Rhoda Spence in Davidson County, Tennessee(5). The question is this: Which Rhoda?

 

Rhoda Louisa Spence (1809-1860)

Rhoda Louisa Spence and James W. Denton were married in Davidson County, Tennessee May 10, 1831. Their children were:

  1. Thomas J. Denton (1832-aft 1860). Thomas was born in Williamson County, Tennessee on January 21, 1832 (a twin), and he died after 1860. He may be the Thomas J. Spence who appears on the 1860 Census for Arkansas in Union Twp., St. Francis, Arkansas.
  2. Elizabeth Jane Denton (1832-1911). Elizabeth was born January 21, 1832 in Williamson County, Tennessee. Elizabeth and Thomas J. were twins if the dates are correct. She died in Newton County, Missouri September 6, 1911. On March 27, 1852, she married James Mattison Buckingham in Williamson County, Tennessee. Their daughter was Milly A. Buckingham (1864-1938).
  3. Milly Ann Denton (1833-1850). Milly was born about 1833 in Williamson County, Tennessee. She last appears on the 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee. She may be the Milly Ann Denton who married Williamson Alexander in Dickson County, Tennessee on October 14, 1852(7)
  4. William Denton (1833-1850). William was born about 1833 in Williamson County, Tennessee. He last appears on the 1850 Williamson County, Tennessee Census in the James W Denton household(8).

James and Rhoda Louisa began experiencing difficulties in their marriage, and I don’t know exactly when those difficulties started. They probably erupted after Rhoda’s  family moved to Western Tennessee and after Susan started spending a great deal of time at Rhoda’s house. One thing led to another, ending in a divorce between James and Rhoda. I haven’t found an exact date for the divorce, but she married Michael D. Gill November 27, 1838–the same year when Susan married James W. Denton! So the divorce would have been about 1836 or 1837. There were four children from her marriage to James Denton: two girls and two boys. Rhoda kept the girls while James kept the boys–hence the Denton surname.  Elizabeth Jane and Milly Ann were raised by Michael D. Gill, and they took the Gill name: Elizabeth Jane Denton Gill and Milly Ann Denton Gill.

Michael David Gill was born about 1800 in Louisa County, Virginia, and he died around 1860 in Jasper County, Missouri. He was the son of Mitchell Gill (1772-1810) of Charlotte County, Virginia and Nancy Dabbs (1774-1809) and the grandson of Michael Gill (1730-1801). Michael’s brother was Mitchell Gill (1803-1880). Mitchell was born February 5, 1803 in Charlotte County, Virginia, and he died March 6, 1880 in Richland, Keokuk County, Iowa. His wife was Catharine Thompson (1796-1880). Their children were:

  1. James Gill (1835-1906)
  2. Susan Gill (b. 1840)
  3. Ellen Gill (b. 1842)
  4. Sarah Gill (b. 1847)
  5. Louisa Gill (b. 1848)
  6. Lydia Annis Gill (1850-1916)

Mitchell may have gone to Tennessee with his brother Michael, but he was in Indiana by 1835. Catherine was probably his second wife. They were married June 4, 1846 in Keokuk, Iowa. The last three children listed above would have been theirs. The first three would have been by a first wife.

Michael David Gill appears on early census records as follows:  the 1820 Census for Charlotte County, Virginia(9), the 1830 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee(10), the 1840 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee(11), the 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee(12), and Missouri Land Records for 1856, 1857, and 1860 in Jasper County, Missouri(13), (14), (15). The Michael D. Gill family were in Jasper County by March 10, 1856 when he obtained his first warrant for land. In all likelihood, they were in the county earlier.

The children of Michael David Gill and Rhoda Louisa Spence follow:

  1. Samuel S. Gill (1842-1880).  Samuel was born in January 1842 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died May 28, 1880 in Savoy, Fannin County, Texas. Samuel served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. His military file is quite substantial.  He enlisted at Camp Cedar July 21, 1862 for a term of three years. He fought in the Battle of Helena, Arkansas July 28, 1863 in which he was slightly wounded. His name appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War of Cos. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I and K, 11th Missouri Infantry of the Confederate Army, commanded by Major James Phillips, surrendered at New Orleans. Louisiana by Gen. E. K. Smith, C.S.A., to Maj. Gen. E.R.S. Canby, USA May 26, 1865; paroled June 8, 1865 at Shreveport, Louisiana(16).  Samuel went to Texas after his release, where he married Emma Louis Brooks (1850-1880) on December 20, 1868 in Fannin County, Texas. Their children were: (a)  William M. Gill, born December, 1869 in Fannin County, Texas; and (b) Maude Gill (1873-1962). William was born about December 1869 in Fannin County, Texas. I have no additional information about him. Maude was born December 24, 1873 in Savoy, Fannin County, Texas, and she died November 30, 1962 in McKinney, Collin, Texas. On November 29, 1898, Maude became the second wife of George Clinton Masters (1861-1942). George’s biography from Find-a-Grave follows:

 

Birth: Sep. 6, 1861
Death: Jun. 20, 1942

born DeKalb County, AL
died Denton, Denton County, TX  From Penne Magnusson Cartright Hannum, rec’d 19 Apr 2015
Clint traveled extensively and was an early day advocate of the motor home and travel trailer. He came to Texas in 1880, worked at various occupations for a few years until he settled in Denton where he became a traveling salesman. He made many trips back to Alabama to visit relatives and entertained everyone with his stories of adventure.Family links:
Parents:
Benjamin Franklin Masters (1833 – 1886)
Nancy Elizabeth Kay Masters (1837 – 1917)Spouses:
Margaret ‘Maggie’ Keith Masters (1869 – 1895)
Maude Gill Masters (1873 – 1962)Children:
Emma Alberta Masters Giddens (1899 – 1998)*
Gill C. Masters (1916 – 1980)*Siblings:
Silas Pickens Masters (1854 – 1868)*
Nuton Jasper Masters (1855 – 1860)*
Robert M. Masters (1858 – 1858)*
John F. Masters (1859 – 1861)*
George Clinton Masters (1861 – 1942)
Ira N. Masters (1863 – 1886)*
Lura Jane Masters Totherow (1865 – 1891)*
Ida Lee Masters Green (1867 – 1917)*
Luther Morgan Masters (1869 – 1943)*
Marcus Lee Masters (1871 – 1959)*
William Addison Masters (1873 – 1942)*
Joseph A Masters (1876 – 1923)*
Ella Jane Masters Upton (1879 – 1972)*
Sidney Wyot Masters (1880 – 1972)**Calculated relationshipInscription:
FatherNote: h/o 1) Margaret ‘Maggie’ Keith and 2) Maude Gill
Burial:
Odd Fellows Cemetery
Denton
Denton County
Texas, USA
Plot: Section A
Created by: RMLeahy
Record added: Jun 13, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 14599940 (17)

Note: The two children listed on the Find-a-Grave Entry are the children of George Clinton Masters and Maude Gill: Emma A. Masters Giddens (1899-1998) and Gill Clinton Masters, Sr. (1916-1980).

Samuel S. Gill is believed to be buried in the Greenwood Cemetery, per the following account:

I believe Samuel Gill is buried here.  The find a grave website details that the west side of this cemetery was devoted to victims of the May 1880, Savoy Tornado. The wooden markers were later destroyed by a grass fire in 1935. So we will never know for sure (18).

Samuel Gill apparently died in the 1880 Savoy tornado!

2.  Daniel David Gill (1844-1920).  Daniel was born February 15, 1844 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died October 29, 1920 in Jane, McDonald, Missouri. Daniel also served in the Confederate Army. He was also in Company A, 11th Missouri Infantry, CSA and enlisted August 10, 1862 at Coon Creek, Missouri under Col. Hunter for three years. He appears to have survived the war unscathed. Unlike his brother, Samuel, he returned to Jasper County, Missouri, where he married Lavesta Ann Roy (b. 1847) in Jasper County. They had one child: Mary Gill (b. 1870). The Gills resided in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri in 1870(19), in Marion, Newton County Missouri in 1880(20), and in Jane, McDonald County, Missouri in 1900(21).  Daniel David Gill died in Jane; he and his wife are buried in the cemetery there. His wife’s name is engraved on the tombstone, but there is no date of death for her.

3. Isaac Ivy Gill (1847-1922). Isaac was born November 24, 1847 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died July 27, 1922 in Jane, McDonald County, Missouri. His middle initial is registered as “A” on his tombstone. I remember reading one descendant’s account that the tombstone carver misunderstood the pronunciation of the middle initial: “Ah” vs. “I”– something related to the southern pronunciation. So the “A” was put on his tombstone. His middle name really was “Ivy.” Isaac was too young for the Civil War.  On January 31, 1875, he married Texanna Triplett (18 in Jasper County, Missouri. She was the daughter of Layton C. Triplett (b. 1832) and Nancy E. Hansford (b. 1834), the niece of George Washington Triplett (1825-1909), who married Rebecca Jane Spence (1828-1859)–daughter of Samuel Perry Spence and Elizabeth Inman [my third great grandparents]– and the granddaughter of John Hore Triplett (1804-1882) and Mary Butler Bradley (1807-1875). Their children were: (a) Daniel Laton Gill (1878-1935); (b) William Franklin Gill (1887-1970)–I have a feeling he was named after my grandfather, William Franklin Spence (1884-1973); (c) Isaac Newt Gill (1898-1952). The Gills resided in Marion, Newton County, Missouri in 1880(22), in Benton Twp., Newton County, Missouri in 1900(23), in Bentonville Ward 3, Newton County, Missouri in 1910(24) and finally in White Rock, McDonald, Missouri in 1920(25).

As noted previously, Rhoda’s daughter by James W. Denton–Elizabeth Jane Denton Blankenship (1832-1911)–resided in Newton County with her family. In 1860, they were in Jackson Twp., Jasper, Missouri.

I should mention here that there was another Louisa Gill who relocated from New York to Jasper County and who settled in Carthage. She was the mother-in-law of A.M. Drake–a noted figure in Jasper County history, and she died in October 1871 in Jasper County. That Louisa Gill was not this one. That Louisa Gill came from New York and descended from a New Hampshire line of Gills who fought in the Revolutionary War. Her maiden name was Gill and not Spence.

So what happened to Michael D. Gill and Rhoda Louisa Spence?

Michael and Rhoda last appear together on the 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee as follows:

Michael D. Gill, age 50, born Virginia–Occupation: Shoemaker

Rhoda Gill, age 42, born North Carolina

Elizabeth J. Gill, age 18, born Tennessee

Milly A Gill, age 17, born Tennessee

Samuel Gill, age 8, born Tennessee

Daniel D. Gill, age 6, born Tennessee

Isaac I. Gill, age 3, born Tennessee(26)

Michael D. Gill last appears on the 1860 Land Warrant (dated August 1, 1860) mentioned previously. Neither Michael nor Rhoda appear on the 1860 Census for Jasper County, Missouri. However, their sons and Rhoda’s daughter by her first marriage do appear on that census: Elizabeth J. (Denton) Buckingham and her family in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri–Census dated July 10, 1860(27);  Samuel Gill as a farm laborer in the Aaron Foster household in Marion, Jasper County, Missouri–Census dated July 3, 1860(28); Daniel Gill in the Milly Catherine Spence Jones household, Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri–Census dated July 9, 1860(29); and Isaac Ivy Gill in the Elizabeth Inman Spence Household, Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri–Census dated July 11, 1860(29).  Michael and Rhoda do not appear on the 1860 Census. I believe that both of them died in June 1860. The August 1, 1860 land warrant to Michael was issued after his death. And the next question is what killed them?

The suspected culprits?

Influenza, Yellow Fever or Cholera!

According to the American Epidemics from the Genealogy Quest Website, Missouri and other places had their share of problems from 1850 through the Civil War.  In my chart below, I stopped with the smallpox epidemic in Pennsylvania in 1860-61. Missouri’s unique problem stemmed from the fact  that so many settlers were moving there mostly from the South where the epidemics were so great, and they were bringing the diseases with them: “Wintering each year in the Deep South, in the spring the disease would join the emigrants heading west. Cholera made its way up the Missouri on riverboats. An outbreak on board the Yellowstone in July 1833 turned it into a floating death trap. One of the few survivors, Joseph La Barge, later recalled that just below Kansas City he buried eight victims in one grave. Fear of an epidemic caused Missouri residents in Jackson County to threaten to destroy the ship(31). The list below is from American Epidemics:

1850 Nationwide Yellow Fever
1850 Alabama, New York Cholera
1850-1 North America Influenza
1851 Coles Co., IL, The Great Plains, and Missouri Cholera
1852 Nationwide Yellow Fever
1853 New Orleans Yellow Fever: 8,000 died
1853 Mobile Yellow Fever: 1,191 deaths
1853 Vicksburg Yellow Fever: 500 deaths
1853 Lake Providence, LA. Yellow Fever: 165 deaths
1853 Philadelphia Yellow Fever: 128 deaths
1853 Jackson, Miss. Yellow Fever: 112 deaths
1855 Nationwide Yellow Fever
1857-9 Worldwide Influenza: one of the greatest epidemics
1860-1 Pennsylvania Smallpox(31)

 

I am reminded of another experience I had while researching my Grandmother Inman’s Clay/Klee line. My second great-grandfather, John Clay (1794-1844) was living in Franklin Twp., Summit County, Ohio. The Clay farms were close together, and John was working over at his uncle, Christian Clay’s farm where he contracted cholera.  Howard and I visited Franklin Twp. while on our way to Pennsylvania one year. The graves are lined up in a row in the Grill Cemetery in Summit County: John, his uncle and his uncle’s family–all of them dying within a few days, weeks or months of each other in 1844. Something similar to this happened in Jackson Twp., Jasper County, Missouri between 1849 and 1860:

Lewis Jones–1849

Daniel Spence–1857

Daniel Bryant–1858 (the father of Adeline Elizabeth Bryant and father-in-law of Lazarus Spence)

Polly Pewitt Spence–1859

Samuel Perry Spence–July 1859

Rebecca Jane Spence (daughter of Samuel)–1859

Rhoda Louisa Spence Gill–June 1860

Michael David Gill–June 1860

and  others.

Michael David Gill and Rhoda Louisa Spence are probably buried in the Moss Springs Cemetery, Jasper County, Missouri. Their graves are not marked.

This article concludes in Part Two

 

References

(1) 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee about James W. Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2) Probate File for James W. Denton, d. 1861, Smith County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James W. Denton and Sophia Shaw. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) Probate File for James W. Denton, d. 1880, Maury County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James W. Denton and Rhoda Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo. Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(6) 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill Family. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7) Tennessee State Marriage Records for Williamson Alexander and Milly Ann Denton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(8) 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee, James W Denton Family. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 17 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(9) 1820 Census for Charlotte County, Virginia, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) 1830 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) 1840 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) 1850 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907, 10 Mar 1856 for Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.

(14) U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907, 15 May 1857 for Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) U.S. General Land Office Records, 1796-1907, 1 Aug 1860 for Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16) Samuel S. Gill Military File, Company A, 2nd Reg’t, 11th Missouri Infantry C.S.A., 1862-1865. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(17) George Clinton “Clint” Masters Find-a-Grave Memorial No. 14599940. Index at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(18) djgill40, Comment on Greenwood Cemetery Photo submitted to Ancestry from Find-a-Grave, 10 May 2015. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(19) 1870 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Daniel David Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(20) 1880 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Daniel David Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(21) 1900 Census for White Rock, McDonald County, Missouri, Daniel David Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(22) 1880 Census for Newton County, Missouri, Isaac Ivy Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(23) 1900 Census for Newton County, Missouri, Isaac Ivy Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(24) 1910 Census for Newton County, Missouri, Isaac Ivy Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(25) 1920 Census for McDonald County, Missouri, Isaac Ivy Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(26) 1850 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee, Michael D. Gill. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(27) 1860 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, James M. Buckingham Family. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(28) 1860 Census for Jasper County, Missouri, Aaron Foster Household. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(29) 1860 Census for Jackson Township, Jasper County, Missouri, Milly Catherine Spence Jones Household. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(30) 1860 Census for Jackson Township, Jasper County, Missouri, Elizabeth Inman Spence Household. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Access: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(31) “Cholera” from the Kansapedia Website: The Kansas Historical Society: Copyright 2015. Author: Unknown.  Article Created: June 2013. Article Modified: February 2013. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at: http://www.kshs.org/kansapedia/cholera/12010

(32) American Epidemics from the Genealogy Quest Website. Date Accessed: 19 Sep 2015. Available online at http://genealogy-quest.com/glossary-terms/american-epidemics/