Elisha Spence (1776-1835): Part Two–Elisha Bell Spence (1818-1840): A “Short” Story

Marshall County, Tennessee Courthouse from the Wikipedia Common Files: "Marshall County Tennessee Courthouse" by Ichabod - Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Marshall_County_Tennessee_Courthouse.jpg#/media/File:Marshall_County_Tennessee_Courthouse.jpg

–Marshall County, Tennessee Courthouse from the Wikipedia Common Files: “Marshall County Tennessee Courthouse” by Ichabod – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Marshall_County_Tennessee_Courthouse.jpg#/media/File:Marshall_County_Tennessee_Courthouse.jpg

Elisha Bell Spence was the youngest son of Elisha Spence (1776-1835) and Jane Bell (1795-1842). He was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1818, and his death has been a big question mark.  For a long time I thought he was the Elisha B. Spence(r) (1818-1851) I discovered years ago in the Bedford County, Tennessee Records(1). After acquiring the book this week and discovering that the Elisha B. Spence(r) listed there was actually born in 1838–three years after Elisha Sr.’s death–I unhappily put the book aside.  Also, that man’s last name was Spencer and not Spence.

So much for that!

Back at the drawing board once again!

I decided to start with what I could prove and go from there. And I seem to have traveled In a circle!

Elisha Bell Spence was born about 1818 in Davidson County, Tennessee. He was one of two males under ten in the Elisha Spence household in Davidson County on the 1820 Census:

Name Elisha Spence
Home in 1820 (City, County, State) Davidson, Tennessee
Enumeration Date August 7, 1820
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10 2  Joseph/Elisha B.
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 15 1
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44 1
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10 2
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15 2
Free White Persons – Females – 16 thru 25 1
Free White Persons – Females – 26 thru 44 1
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture 2
Free White Persons – Under 16 7
Free White Persons – Over 25 2
Total Free White Persons 10
Total All Persons – White, Slaves, Colored, Other 10                            (2)

He next appears on the 1830 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee in the Elisha Spence household as the male aged 10 through 14:

Name Elisha Spense
Home in 1830 (City, County, State) Davidson, Tennessee
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14 1  Elisha B.
Free White Persons – Males – 15 thru 19 1
Free White Persons – Males – 50 thru 59 1
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14 1
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19 1
Free White Persons – Females – 50 thru 59 1
Free White Persons – Under 20 4
Total Free White Persons 6
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored) 6                             (3)

The last census record for Elisha B. is the 1840 Census for Marshall County, Tennessee in the Jane Spence household. He is her only child living at home, and he appears to be married:

Name Jane Spence
Home in 1840 (City, County, State) Marshall, Tennessee
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14 1
Free White Persons – Males – 15 thru 19 1
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29 1 Elisha B.
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14 1
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19 1  Elisha B.’s Wife??
Free White Persons – Females – 40 thru 49 1  Jane Spence
Persons Employed in Agriculture 1
No. White Persons over 20 Who Cannot Read and Write 2
Free White Persons – Under 20 4
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49 2
Total Free White Persons 6
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves 6                          (4)

I have no idea who the other three people are. Elisha was Jane Spence’s youngest child. She may have taken in some orphans, or they may have been her daughter-in-law’s relatives. To date, I have found no marriage record for Elisha B.

According to the Tennessee Secretary of State’s website, Marshall County suffered two courthouse fires: one in 1872 and the other in 1927(5), so that is no doubt the reason. Elisha B. probably married in 1840 just prior to the census. That image is undated, so I cannot approximate a date of marriage.

And this is where the evidence ends.

Some people think Elisha B. died in 1863 during the Civil War. So, I spent the morning searching through Civil War service records.  I found an E. B. Spence in Mississippi who fought for the Confederacy during the Civil War, but he was born in 1810 in North Carolina. To make a long story short,  I could find no record supporting military service for Elisha B. Spence during the Civil War. I think some people have confused  Elisha B. with Elisha H. Spence–his cousin–who is discussed in the previous article (Part One). That Elisha did serve in the Confederate Army, did survive the war, moved to Arkansas and received a pension. The other Elisha–another cousin– will be discussed in Part Three, and that Elisha did not survive the war.

My belief is that both Elisha B. and his wife died either late 1840 or early 1841. Jane Spence died in 1842, so I think Elisha B. and his wife died before then.

Given the fact that two major fires destroyed the courthouse in 1872 and again in 1927, we will probably never know.

 

This series concludes with Part Three: Amos B. Spence (1800-bef 1850) and Mary Elizabeth Spence (1805-1872)

References

(1) Helen Marsh and Timothy Marsh. Bedford County, Tennessee Cemetery Records.  Southern Historical Press (January 12, 1998).

(2) 1820 Census, Davidson County, Tennessee for Elisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) 1830 Census, Davidson County, Tennessee for Elisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) 1840 Census, Marshall County, Tennessee for Jane Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 8 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) “Lost Records: Courthouse Fires and Disasters in Tennessee: Marshall County.” From the Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. Tennessee Secretary of State’s Website. Date Accessed: 8 Oct 2015. Available online at http://tn.gov/tsla/history/county/lost.htm

Elisha Spence (1776-1835): The Youngest Sons–Part One: Joseph Spence (1816-1860)–Two Families Unscrambled

Joseph Spence and Mary "Polly McDaniel Marriage Record in Tennessee Marriages

Joseph Spence and Mary “Polly” McDaniel Marriage Record in Tennessee Marriages

This is the story of what happens when you have four families in one or two generations with numerous children bearing the same names! It creates a hideous phenomenon known more commonly as a Major Mess! For years, I wondered about some of the information I had acquired concerning the two youngest sons of Elisha Spence–Joseph Spence (1816-1860) and Elisha Bell Spence (1818-1840)–his last two children. But for the life of me, I could not find anything more than what I had acquired. Fortunately, with the availability of many records today, I was able to achieve some success on these lines. While unscrambling the two lines, I went on to unscramble  additional lines–something I had to do in order to prove I had unscrambled the first two! And while my original intention was to combine Joseph and his brother Elisha in one article, that proved to be impossible.

This last article will be divided into three parts: Part One dealing with Joseph Spence (1816-1860) and Mary “Polly” McDaniel (1817-1850); Part Two dealing with Elisha Bell Spence (1818-1840); Part Three dealing with another cousin family who has been snaggled up into all of this. With all of this in mind, I will now enter Part One.

In 1816, Elisha and Jane Bell Spence had a son. One of Elisha’s cousins–Brittain Spence (1791-1829)–and his wife–Jane “Jennie” Forehand (1797-1830)–also had a son in 1816. I do not know which son was born first, but they were born close together. Elisha and Jane lived in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1816. Brittain and Jennie lived either in Davidson County or in Rutherford County in 1816. By 1820, Brittain and his family relocated to Rutherford County, Tennessee, where they appear on the Census for that year(1). They were married in Davidson County May 9, 1812(2). Elisha and Jane Bell were married in Davidson two years previously on October 25, 1810(3). Jennie Forehand was a sister of Phoebe Forehand (1802-1878), who married William Spence (1795-1869)–another cousin of both Elisha and Brittain. [This William Spence is destined to return in Part Three of this article. Interesting to note that I began this entire Spence series over a year ago with an article on William Spence. I will be closing it with an article on the same line!]

My guess is that Brittain and Jennie’s son was born first since they named him Joseph Spence. “Joseph” was a common name in Brittain’s family. His parents were Samuel Spence (1760-1805) and Julian (Julia/Juliana) Gray (1760-1804)–the same Gray line that Elisha’s son, Levi James Spence (1801-1843) married into. Brittain’s grandparents were Joseph Spence (1700-1783) and Louisa Sarah Rencher (1708-1783), and his great grandparents were Alexander Spence (1669-1735) and Dorothy Truman (1672-1734). Alexander Spence was a brother of James Spence (1674-1740)–Elisha Spence’s grandfather.

Shortly after the birth of Brittain and Jennie’s Joseph, Jane Bell Spence gave birth to a boy. And the two families decided that wouldn’t it be nice if two babies bore name the same name of Joseph!  Thus begins the confusion! For clarity’s sake here, I will refer to Elisha and Jane’s son as Joseph (Elisha) and to Brittain and Jennie’s son as Joseph (Brittain). I will discuss Joseph (Brittain) first since I believe he was born first (and he is less complicated!)

Joseph Spence (1816-1880), Mary Ann Fears (1817-1859), and Mary E. (Spence) (1844-1880)

Brittain and Jennie Forehand Spence’s children follow:

  1. Samuel Spence (b. 1814).  Samuel was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee. According to Brittain’s Will(4), Samuel was his oldest son. I have no additional information about him.
  2. Joseph Spence (1816-1880). Under discussion here as Joseph (Brittain).
  3. Elizabeth Spence (b. 1819). Elizabeth was born about 1819 in Rutherford County, Tennessee, and she died March 3, 1899 in Rutherford County, Tennessee. She had two marriages: Eben R. (or B.) Fears, whom she married June 17, 1833 in Rutherford County, Tennessee(5) and John Evans, whom she married May 27, 1841 in Rutherford County(6). She is identified in her father’s will.
  4. Phoebe Spence (1820-1897)–named for Jennie’s sister.  Identified in her father’s will. Phoebe was born October 7, 1820 in Rutherford County, Tennessee, and she died March 7, 1897 in Rutherford County, Tennessee. Her husband was James Granderson Williams (1812-1898), whom she married in Rutherford County, Tennessee June 16, 1836(7). Their children were: (a) William Nelson Williams (1838-1917); (b) Elizabeth Jane Williams (1841-1914); (c) Enoch Alson Williams (1844-1864); (d) Nancy Virginia Williams (1847-1929); (e) Malissa (Mary?) Ann Williams (1850-1851); (f) Phebe Adna Williams (1854-1933); (g) Mary James Williams (1858-1862). Phebe is identified in her father’s will.
  5. Alson Spence (1822-1860).  Alson is also identified in his father’s will. He was born in Rutherford County about 1822, and he died in Rutherford County. Some people believe he lived to be almost 100! But his probate file is dated 1860 in Rutherford County(8). His wife’s name was Mary Ann Revel (1822-1860), whom he married December 23, 1840 in Rutherford County(9). Some records identify her as Mary Ann Reed (same marriage date). I believe that is a transcription error and that her name was Revel.  Their children were: (a) Francis Spence (1842-1861)–Francis may have died in the Civil War; (b) Sarah J. Spence (1844-1861)–she married William Jefferson Carlton (1837-1912) in 1860 and died the following year; (c) Kinchen R. Spence (1846-aft 1860); (d) Julia A. Spence (1850-1920)–she married John E. Mallard (1846-1918); (e) Arvie B. Spence (1852-1929)–she married John Asbury Williams (1847-1925)(10), (11).
  6. William Spence (b. 1823). William is mentioned in his father’s will. He was born in Rutherford County about 1823. He was alive when his father died in 1830, but I could find no record for him after that. He may have died young.
  7. Mary Spence (b. 1825). Mary is mentioned in her father’s will. She would have died after 1830. May have died young.
  8. Julianna Spence (1827-1854). Julianna is mentioned in her father’s will. She was born March 5, 1827 in Rutherford County, Tennessee, and she died January 2, 1854 in Bedford County, Tennessee. She married John Richard Stem (1822-1878) in 1852. They had a son named Marion Luther Stem (1853-1906). She died in 1854. According to her Find-a-Grave Memorial where she is erroneously identified as Ann Sprouse, she was born March 5, 1827 in Rutherford County, Tennessee, and she died January 2, 1854 in Bedford County, Tennessee(12). She is buried in the Stem Cemetery in Bedford County, Tennessee.

The second son of Brittain and Jennie Forehand Spence, Joseph Spence was born either in Davidson County, Tennessee or in Rutherford County, Tennessee in 1816. He died in Greene County, Arkansas after 1880. He is identified as the second son in his father’s will(13). Joseph had two marriages. His first wife was Mary Ann Fears (1817-1859). They had married in Rutherford County on December 4, 1833(14). Their children follow:

  1. Nancy Louisa Spence (1831/4-1909). [Note: I provide two dates of birth here. Her tombstone on Find-a-Grave indicates that she was born in 1831. However, her parents didn’t get married until 1833. More than likely, she was born in 1834 in Rutherford County, Tennessee.] She died in Marshall County, Tennessee on July 15, 1909. According to her Find-a-Grave Memorial:
Birth: Oct. 4, 1831
Death: Jul. 15, 1909

Nancy Louisa Spence Endsley
Dau of Joseph Spence & Nancy [sic] Ann Fears Spence
Wife of Alexander M Endsley
Married 30 Aug 1856 i Marshall Co TNFamily links:
Spouse:
A M Endsley (1826 – 1908)*Children:
J J Endsley (1858 – 1894)*
Julia Endsley Smith (1868 – 1913)**Calculated relationship
Burial:
Head Springs Cemetery
Lewisburg
Marshall County
Tennessee, USA
Created by: gordon
Record added: Apr 24, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 68877718 [15]

The full list of their children follows: (a) John J. Endsley (1858-1894); (b) William M. Endsley (1859-1931); (c) Martha J. Endsley (b. 1860); (d) George A. Endsley (1864-1935); (e) Mary E. Endsley (b. 1866); (f) Julia C. Endlsey Smith (1868-1913); (g) Joseph E. Endsley (b. 1870).

2. Britton Spence (1835-1910). Britton was born in September 1835 Rutherford County, Tennessee, and he died in Arkansas in 1910. His wife was Elizabeth “Betsy” A. Cox (1840-1910). Their children were: (a) Charles Spence (b. 1858); (b) R. Spence (b. 1860); (c) Minerel Millinder Spence (1869-1939); (d) Allie B. Spence (b. 1872); (e) Eva M. Spence (b. 1880). Prior to relocating to Arkansas, Britton settled in Madison County, Tennessee, where he and his family appear on the 1860 Census(16).

3. William Spence (1837-1900). William was born in March 1837 in Tennessee, and he died in 1900 in Perry, St. Francois, Missouri. His wife was Susan M. Steele (b. 1842). Their children were: (a) John P. Spence (b. 1865); (b) Sarah F. Spence (b. 1866); (c) Eller Spence (b. 1868); (d) Londokie Spence (b. 1877); (e) Joseph C. Spence (b. 1883); (f) George Anthony Spence (b. 1887); (g) Leona Spence (b. 1889).

Mary Ann Fears died around 1859. Joseph went to Kentucky by 1860 where he married his second wife: Mary E. (Her last name is unknown.)  By 1870, Joseph moved his family to Clark, Greene County, Arkansas, where they appear on the 1870 Census(17). The children of Joseph Spence and Mary E. Spence follow:

  1. Julia Ann Spence (1865-1880). Julia was born in Tennessee about 1865, and she died after the 1880 Census in Greene County, Arkansas. I have no further information about her.
  2. Susan “Sudie” Spence (1872-1930). Sudie was born in Haliday, Arkansas in 1872, and she died in 1930 in Greene County, Arkansas. Her first husband was John Michael “Mike” Cooper (1865-1920), whom she married in 1887 in Greene County, Arkansas. Their children were: (a) Carlie C. (Charles) Cooper (1887-1943); (b) an unidentified child born 1890; (c) Pearly Cooper (1893-1920). Her second husband was James H. Ward (1880-1920),whom she  married in 1900 in Greene County, Arkansas(18).  Their children were: (a) Robert Ward (1901-1994); (b) Charles Ward (b. 1906).
  3. Charles Edward Spence (1873-1940). Charles was born February 15, 1873 in Arkansas, and he died after 1940 in Collier, Greene, Arkansas. His wife was Bertha E. Spense (b. 1885). Their son was Cletra R. Spence (b. 1914).
  4. Mary E. Spence (1877-aft 1880). Mary was born about 1877 in Arkansas, and she died after 1880 in Union and Clark, Greene County, Arkansas.

Joseph and his family appear on the 1880 Census for Greene County, Arkansas(19). They may have moved to Independence County, Arkansas by late 1880 or early 1881 because I found a probate file for Joseph Spence listed there(20).

Joseph (Brittain) will reappear in the next section.

 

Joseph Spence (1816-1860), Mary “Polly” McDaniel (1817-1850), and Frances E. Spence (1838-1860)

The Elisha Spence family and the Brittain Spence family may have traveled from North Carolina to Tennessee together. The two families were close, and the two young Joseph Spences grew up together and bonded like brothers. They kept things lively in the neighborhood, no doubt pulling tricks on other family members.

Elisha and Jane Bell Spence’s second youngest son, Joseph–noted here as Joseph (Elisha) –was born in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1816, and he died after the 1860 census in Haywood County, Tennessee. Had I not discovered his marriage record in a book of Tennessee Marriage Records at the Denver Public Library years ago, I may not have ever found him! His records have been so mixed in with Joseph (Brittain)’s, it is difficult sorting them out. However, I accepted the challenge and weathered the storm!

A young child Joseph’s age appears in the Elisha Spence household on the 1820 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee. A chart depicting the family is listed below. I included their names in the margin:

Name Elisha Spence
Home in 1820 (City, County, State) Davidson, Tennessee
Enumeration Date August 7, 1820
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10 2 (Joseph/Elisha B)
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 15 1  (William)
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44 1  (Elisha)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10 2 (Angeline/Jane)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15 2  (Rhoda/Susan)
Free White Persons – Females – 16 thru 25 1  (Milly Catherine)
Free White Persons – Females – 26 thru 44 1  (Jane)
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture 2
Free White Persons – Under 16 7
Free White Persons – Over 25 2
Total Free White Persons 10
Total All Persons – White, Slaves, Colored, Other 10                           (21)

Milly Catherine had married Lewis Jones that year and lived in Perry County, but she was helping out her family in Davidson County when this census record was taken. Samuel and Daniel were in Perry County, Tennessee. Levi James was living in North Carolina.

The 1830 Census for the Elisha Spence household in Davidson County presents the following image:

Name Elisha Spense
Home in 1830 (City, County, State) Davidson, Tennessee
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14 1  (Elisha B)
Free White Persons – Males – 15 thru 19 1  (Joseph)
Free White Persons – Males – 50 thru 59 1  (Elisha)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14 1  (Jane)
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19 1  (Angeline)
Free White Persons – Females – 50 thru 59 1  (Jane)
Free White Persons – Under 20 4
Total Free White Persons 6
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored) 6                         (22)

The children of the first marriage are gone. Samuel, Daniel, Milly Catherine and her husband are in Perry County, Tennessee. Levi has returned from North Carolina and is living in Madison County, Tennessee. William is now living in North Carolina. Rhoda and Susan were living in Williamson County. Shortly after this census was taken, Elisha moved his family to Madison County, where he died in November 1835(23). After her husband’s death, Jane Bell Spence moved her family to Marshall County, Tennessee, where some of them appear on the 1840 Census:

Name Jane Spence
Home in 1840 (City, County, State) Marshall, Tennessee
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14 1
Free White Persons – Males – 15 thru 19 1
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29 1 (Elisha B)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14 1
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19 1 (Elisha B’s wife?)
Free White Persons – Females – 40 thru 49 1 (Jane)
Persons Employed in Agriculture 1
No. White Persons over 20 Who Cannot Read and Write 2
Free White Persons – Under 20 4
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49 2
Total Free White Persons 6
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves 6                        (24)

My perception of this chart has changed since my earlier examination of it. Elisha B. Spence is the only one left at home with possibly a wife? I don’t know the identities of the others living in Jane’s household. She may have taken in some orphans. The other possibility is that they were siblings of Elisha B.’s wife. (Hope to settle that issue in Part Two of this article.)

So where was Joseph?

I don’t believe he settled in Marshall County with his mother. In fact, I believe he relocated to Williamson County before his father’s death. Some of his siblings had already settled there or were in the process of settling there. He liked being close to other family members, and he renewed his close ties with his cousin, Joseph (Brittain). The distance between Williamson and Rutherford County was short, so family members visited one another frequently. And shortly after his removal to Williamson County, Joseph met his future wife.

Her name was Mary “Polly” McDaniel (1817-1850). She was the daughter of Lowery McDaniel (1774-1852) and his wife Margaret (1780-1860), who lived in Davidson County. I don’t know how Joseph became acquainted with Polly McDaniel. Lowerey McDaniel appears on an early Davidson County tax list dated July 19, 1813, so the McDaniels, like the Spence family, were early settlers there(25). No doubt, Joseph and Polly had known one another since childhood. And Polly McDaniel may have been the reason why Joseph returned to the area.

They were married July 29, 1835 in Davidson County, Tennessee(26), four months prior to Elisha Spence’s death and two years after his cousin, Joseph (Brittain)’s marriage. The couple then settled in Williamson County, where they appear on the 1840 Census:

Name Joseph Spence
Home in 1840 (City, County, State) Williamson, Tennessee
Free White Persons – Males – Under 5 2 (Unknown Sons)
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29 1  (Joseph)
Free White Persons – Females – 5 thru 9 1  (Unknown daughter)
Free White Persons – Females – 20 thru 29 1  (Polly)
Persons Employed in Agriculture 1
Free White Persons – Under 20 3
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49 2
Total Free White Persons 5
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves 5                                (27)

By 1840, Joseph and Polly had three children–two boys and a girl. The girl was the oldest and is listed as between the ages of five through nine. She was probably born in 1836. The two boys are under the ages of five. The names of these children are unknown because they did not survive and died long before the 1850 Census. Three names of their later children are known, however, but are not without controversy. I will introduce these children by name. Then I will discuss the controversy. Then I will discuss the children individually. But I need to introduce another cousin first because she is going to impact this study. Her name was Frances E. Spence. She was born about 1838, and she was the daughter of Amos B. Spence (1800-bef. 1850) and Mary Elizabeth Spence (1805-1872). This family will be profiled in Part Three, but Frances enters the picture here. One of Joseph and Polly’s daughters would be named for her.

The names of the known children of Joseph and Polly McDaniel Spence follow:

  1. Elisha H. Spence (1841-1921)
  2. Joseph Spence (1845-1860)
  3. Frances “Fanny” A. Spence (1849-1880)–the child named after the cousin Frances, born 1838.

These children appear in the Joseph (Brittain) household on the 1850 Census for Rutherford County, Tennessee, per the following:

Name Joseph Spence
Age 34
Birth Year 1816
Birthplace Tennessee
Home in 1850 May, Rutherford, Tennessee
Gender Male
Family Number 1017
Household Members
Name Age
Joseph Spence 34
Mary A Spence 33
Nancy Spence 16
Britton Spence 14
Wm Spence 11
Elisha Spence 9
Jos Spence 4
Fanny Spence 1   (28)

For  years, people have been including Elisha, Joseph and Fanny as children of Joseph Spence (Brittain) and Mary Ann Fears when instead, they were children of Joseph Spence (Elisha) and Mary “Polly” McDaniel. I must admit I did the same thing until I started digging into it. What follows is the rest of the story.

Joseph and Polly had three children: Elisha (born 1841), Joseph (born 1845), and Fanny (born 1849). Polly never recovered from the birth of Fanny, and Joseph was beside himself. Plus they experienced the deaths of their first three children, whose names are unknown. Finally, Lowery McDaniel (Polly’s father) and Joseph (Brittain) came to the rescue. Polly would return to her parents’ house to recover there. The children would stay with Joseph (Brittain) and Mary Ann Fears until Polly recovered. The 1850 Census for Lowery McDaniel follows:

Name Lowery McDanel
Age 76
Birth Year 1774
Birthplace Virginia
Home in 1850 District 22, Davidson, Tennessee
Race White
Gender Male
Family Number 9
Household Members
Name Age
Lowery McDanel 76
Margaret McDanel 70
Polly McDanel 40
Honrles McDanel 42
John McDanel 36
Drewry McDanel 34
William McDanel 32
Lousana McDanel 12
Rebecca McDanel 27 (29)

This is another case of the census taker assuming that everyone in the household possessed the same surname. Most of them did. Polly’s surname was Spence. The census taker did provide the location of births for the people listed here. Lowery was born in Virginia.  Margaret, Polly, and Honries were born in South Carolina. The others were born in Tennessee. I believe Honries, John, Drewry and William were Polly’s brothers. Rebecca was probably a wife of one of them. Lousana was probably one of Lowery and Margaret’s grandchildren. Census takers did not designate actual relationships on these early census records.

Polly did not recover. The census record is dated November 22, 1850. Polly died shortly after that record was taken. And then Joseph really was beside himself. His grief left him powerless to do anything.  Finally, one cold blustery wintry day, he went to Rutherford County to see his children. Twelve-year old Frances Spence was staying in the household at the time, helping Mary with the children. Noting his cousin’s depression, Joseph (Brittain) made a suggestion. [The following is not an exact conversation, but a suggestion as to what could have been said.]

“Why not go out to Missouri?”

“What?” Joseph asked.

“Why not go out to Missouri and see your family? You need to get away from here.”

Joseph grew silent.

“Find someone to go with you–” Joseph (Brittain)’s eyes traveled across the room in the direction of young Frances, whose eyes were wide at the suggestion. Frances’ adoration of Joseph was well known throughout the family. “Like Frances, here!” he added.

Frances’ hand shot immediately to her mouth.

Joseph laughed. It was the first time any of them had seen him laugh in weeks.

“Are you kidding?” He said. “Mary would never let me haul Frances out to Missouri!”

“Well, all we can do is ask!”

“In this weather?”

“Go when the weather clears in the spring.”

Joseph grew silent. He hadn’t seen some of his family since their father’s funeral. It would be great seeing them again.

“Angeline lives in St. Louis,” he said. “I guess the rest of them live on the other side of the state–Jasper and Newton County. Rhoda and Dave Gill talk about moving there.”

Getting approval for Joseph to take Frances to Missouri required a trip to see her mother Mary, who was now living in Weakley County. So the following weekend, Mary Spence was surprised to see the two Josephs and her daughter standing on her porch. Amos had passed away. Mary chose to continue living in Weakley with her children. And when she heard why they were there, she could only gasp–

“You want to do–WHAT? MISSOURI!”

It took some time to persuade her, but both Josephs were expert in persuading people to do things–something they had mastered as young boys.

Mary eyed her daughter, whose eyes clearly read: “PLEASE!”

“And after all, we are pioneers!” Joseph (Brittain) closed his argument.

“Oh, I don’t know! Missouri! Oh my! What would Amos say?”

“I’m sure he would approve!” Joseph (Brittain) offered.

Finally, Joseph (Elisha) found  his voice.

“I can’t think of another person I would like to travel with me to Missouri, Mary!” He said. “I can promise you, I’ll keep her safe!”

And so when spring broke and the weather settled, Joseph and Frances traveled to Missouri. Joseph liked Frances. She was easy to talk to, and she listened. They stopped a day or so in St. Louis to see Angeline, who was a widow. Then they traveled to Jasper County and astounded everyone when they showed up on their doorsteps. A great celebration took place to welcome them. Of course, the people spent hours listening to Joseph’s stories about Polly and his children who were living with a cousin in Rutherford County. And they plied Frances with questions about her family. And then the day came for them to leave.

“Well, Joe, you oughta move here!” Samuel suggested.

“Oh, maybe,” Joseph responded. “Guess I’ll be in Tennessee for a while.”

The family watched them head down the road.

“I can see which direction this is going,” Samuel told Elizabeth. “They’ll be married in a few years.”

Joseph Spence and Frances E. Spence were married in Weakley County, Tennessee about 1853 when Frances turned fifteen. They settled in District 4 in Haywood County, Tennessee, where they appear on the 1860 Census:

Name Joseph Spence
Age 44
Birth Year 1816
Gender Male
Birth Place Tennessee
Home in 1860 District 4, Haywood, Tennessee
Post Office Belles Depot
Family Number 732
Household Members
Name Age
Joseph Spence 44
Francis E Spence 22
Elisha Spence 19
Joseph Spence 15
Francis A Spence 13  (30)

Joseph (Brittain)’s wife Mary Ann Fears had died in Rutherford County in 1859. In 1860 when Joseph (Elisha) and Francis were living in Haywood County, Joseph (Brittain) traveled to Kentucky that year where he married his second wife: Mary E (Last Name Unknown). She may have been a cousin. At this point, I don’t know. Joseph’s children by his first marriage had left home by 1860. It is unknown how long he remained in Kentucky but by 1870, he had relocated to Greene County, Arkansas. His name is erroneously recorded on the 1870 Census as Joseph Spencer:

Name Joseph Spencer
Age in 1870 54
Birth Year 1816
Birthplace Tennessee
Home in 1870 Clark, Greene, Arkansas
Race White
Gender Male
Post Office Gainesville
Household Members
Name Age
Joseph Spencer 54
Mary E Spencer 26
Julian Spencer 7
Susan Spencer (31)

Joseph (Elisha) remained in Haywood County, Tennessee. His  sister, Mary Jane, and her husband James Garrett had lived in District 10 prior to 1860. But as noted in a previous article, Jane and James Garrett and their two children died before 1860.

I wish I could say this story has a happy ending for Joseph and Frances, but it does not. Sometime after the 1860 Haywood County Census, Joseph, Frances, and Joseph’s son, Joseph, died. They either died of some disease, or they may have been casualties of the Civil War. Fighting was fierce in Western Tennessee (which was primarily Confederate) during the Civil War. People were often killed simply for being loyal to the Confederacy, or else they were caught in the crossfire. Fortunately, the other two children: Elisha H. and Fanny survived. Their stories follow.

Elisha H. Spence (1841-1921). Elisha was born in May 1841 in Williamson County, Tennessee, and he died November 1, 1921 in Sweet Home, Pulaski, Arkansas. As previously noted, Elisha, his brother Joseph, and his sister Fanny lived with Joseph (Brittain) and Mary Ann Fears Spence in Rutherford County after their mother’s death in 1850. They were reunited with their father Joseph (Elisha) after his marriage to Francis in 1855, placing them in Haywood County. In 1861, Elisha enlisted in Company G, Tennessee 27th Infantry Regiment, C.S.A(32). According to his service records, he served in both Companies C and G, and his service appears to have been long-term. He did survive the War. I believe that had his family members died of a disease or plague, Elisha and his sister would have died as well. So I think his family died in the conflict.

After the Civil War ended, Elisha went to Kentucky, where he met and married Matilda (Last Name Unknown) (1844-1900) in 1866. Between 1866 and 1876, Elisha and his family appear to move back and forth between Kentucky and Tennessee. Then he moved to Greene County, Arkansas where Joseph (Brittain) was living. Had he been a natural son of this Joseph, he would have headed to Arkansas immediately after his discharge. But he was searching for his own family members in Kentucky and Tennessee. When he discovered they were all gone, he relocated to Arkansas, where he rejoined the Joseph (Brittain) family.

The children of Elisha H. Spence and Matilda follow:

  1. Jackson W. Spence (1868-1963)
  2. Chapil N. Spence (b. 1869)
  3. Lenora Spence (b. 1872)
  4. Samuel Spence (1876-1902)
  5. Robert J. Spence (b. 1878)
  6. Francis Crice Spence (b. 1884)

Elisha H. Spence died November 1, 1921 in Sweet Home, Pulaski County, Arkansas(33). He is buried in the Little Rock National Cemetery, Little Rock, Arkansas.

Frances “Fanny” A. Spence (1849-1880). Fanny was born in Williamson County, Tennessee, and she died after 1880 in Texas. As noted earlier, she was named for a cousin–Frances E. Spence (1838-1860)–who  eventually became her step-mother. After her parents and brother Joseph died, her other brother Elisha took her to relatives in Madison County, Tennessee, and she stayed with them until she married.  On August 14, 1869, Fanny married James H. Bray (1840-1921) in Madison County, Tennessee(34).  Their children were:

  1. Ella Bray, born 1862
  2. Lillie Bray, born 1869
  3. John S. Bray, born 1872
  4. E. H. Bray, born 1874.

James H. Bray was born in Marshall County, Tennessee April 12, 1840, and he died February 6, 1921 in San Antonio, Bexar, Texas. His parents were Elisha G. Bray (1804-1877) and Rachel P. McDaniel (1818-1887)–possibly a relative of Polly McDaniel.  According to his veteran’s records, he served with the Confederate Army in the Civil War and received a pension for his service:

Name J H Bray
Application Date 4 Apr 1916
Birth Year 1840
Birth Place Marshall, Tennessee
Age 76
Pension File Number 32762
Application Type Veteran
Household Members
Name Age
J H Bray 76  (35)

The Brays appear on the 1880 Census for Blossom Prairie, Lamar, Texas(36). This is the last record for Fanny. She would have died after that 1880 Census.  James H. Bray died February 6, 1921 in San Antonio, Bexar, Texas(37).

 

This article continues with Part Two: Elisha Bell Spence (1818-1840)

 

References

(1) 1820 Census for Rutherford County, Tennessee about Brittain Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(2) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Brittain Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Elisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, 1779-2008 about Brittain Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Elizabeth Spence and Eben Fears. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(6) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Elizabeth Spence and John Evans. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7)  Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Phoebe Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(8) Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, 1779-2008. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(9) Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, 1779-2008. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) 1850 Census for Alson Spence, Rutherford County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) 1860 Census for Alson Spence, Rutherford County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) Find-a-Grave Memorial for Juliana Spence Stem (listed as Ann Sprouse), Find A Grave Memorial# 22971124. Find-a-Grave Website. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com

(13) Tennessee Wills and Probate Records, 1779-2008 about Brittain Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Joseph Spence [Brittain]. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) Nancy L. Spence Endsley Find A Grave Memorial# 68877718. Find-a-Grave.com website. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www. ancestry.com.

(16) 1860 Census for Madison County, Tennessee about Britton Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(17) 1870 Census for Clark, Greene County, Arkansas for Joseph Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(18) Arkansas County Marriages, Index, 1837-1957 about Sudie Spence Cooper. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(19) 1880 Census for Greene County, Arkansas for Joseph Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(20) Arkansas, Wills and Probate Records, 1783-1998 about Joseph Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(21) 1820 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee for Elisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(22) 1830 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee for Elisha Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 6 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(23) Elisha Spence Estate Inventory dated November 1835. Copy obtained from the Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.

(24) 1840 Census for Marshall County, Tennessee for Jane Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(25) North Carolina and Tennessee, Early Land Records, 1753-1931 about Lowerey McDaniel. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(26) Tennessee State Marriage Records, 1780-2002 about Joseph Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(27) 1840 Census for Williamson County, Tennessee about Joseph Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(28) 1850 Census for Rutherford County, Tennessee about Joseph Spence (Brittain). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(29) 1850 Census for Davidson County, Tennessee about Polly McDaniel Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(30) 1860 Census for Haywood County, Tennessee about Joseph Spence (Elisha). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(31) 1870 Census for Greene County, Arkansas for Joseph Spence(r). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(32) U.S., Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, 1861-1865 about Elisha H. Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(33) U.S. National Cemetery Interment Control Forms, 1928-1962 about Elisha H. Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(34) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Frances Spence and James H. Bray. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(35) Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958 about J H Bray. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(36) 1880 Census for Lamar County, Texas, J. H. Bray. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(37) Texas Death Certificates, 1903-1982 about J. H. Bray. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 7 Oct 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–The Second Family: Part Two–Mary Jane Spence (1813-1860) and James Garrett (1806-1860)

James Garrett and Mary Jane Spence Marriage Record--Copy obtained from the Tennessee State Archives and Library

James Garrett and Mary Jane Spence Marriage Record–Copy obtained from the Tennessee State Archives and Library

 

[NOTE: This article is a major undertaking. I started it over several times before settling upon this final draft. The absence of original records destroyed by fire, floods and human hands creates a major barrier to validity. That absence also leads to frustration, and frustration leads to the creation of fiction. Fiction impedes finding the truth. My frustration here this week  has dealt with fiction writers and has led to numerous headaches. I hope that I have done justice to the people involved in this narrative. My goal is to tell their stories as accurately as possible.]

Mary Jane Spence (1813-1860) and James Garrett (1806-1860)

The second daughter of Elisha Spence and Jane Bell, Mary Jane Spence (Jane Spence) was born in Williamson County, Tennessee between 1813-1815, and she died before 1860 in Haywood County, Tennessee. On September 21, 1842, she married James Garrett (1806-1860) in Williamson County, Tennessee(2). [Note: The bond was recorded September 20 and the marriage return date was recorded September 21. She is listed on one document as Jane Spence and on the other as M. Jane Spence.] They were in Haywood County, Tennessee in 1850, where they appear on the Census(3). A summary of the 1850 Census follows:

Name Jane Garrett
Age 35
Birth Year abt 1815
Birthplace Tennessee
Home in 1850 District 10, Haywood, Tennessee
Gender Female
Family Number 381
Household Members
Name Age
James Garrett 46
Jane Garrett 35
Harvey Garrett 6
Sarah Garrett 6(4)

There were three generations of “Mary Janes” in her family; her maternal grandmother, Mary Jane Boyd Bell; her mother, Mary Jane Bell Spence, and Jane–Mary Jane Spence! Young Jane followed the same tradition as  her mother: they were both known by their middle names.

She grew up in the Elisha Spence household and watched the older children disappear. She knew Samuel, Daniel and Milly Catherine but since Levi and William spent so many years in North Carolina, she wasn’t all that familiar with them. Apparently, she was a companion of the two Rhodas while they were still at home.

Her father died in November 1835 in Madison County, Tennessee(5). After his death, her mother took her children to Marshall County, where Jane Bell Spence died about 1842. She last appears on the 1840 Census for Marshall County, Tennessee(6).  The following is a summary of that census record–[Note: Jane Bell Spence is 40-49 on this record. The youngest son Elisha B. Spence is the only one at home. The female 15 through 19 is Elisha’s wife. I do not know the identities of the other three people but believe they were Elisha’s wife’s siblings. Joseph Spence had moved to Williamson County, where he married in 1835. Angeline and Mary Jane also relocated to Williamson County where other siblings were living by 1838]:

Name Jane Spence
Home in 1840 (City, County, State) Marshall, Tennessee
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14 1
Free White Persons – Males – 15 thru 19 1
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29 1 (Elisha B. Spence)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14 1
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19 1 (Elisha’s Wife)
Free White Persons – Females – 40 thru 49 1 (Jane Spence)
Persons Employed in Agriculture 1
No. White Persons over 20 Who Cannot Read and Write 2
Free White Persons – Under 20 4
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49 2
Total Free White Persons 6
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves 6 (7)

As previously noted, after her mother’s death, young Jane had a decision to make about her own future. Samuel, Daniel and Milly Catherine were already in Missouri, and Angeline was making plans to move there. She invited Jane to go with her. But Missouri was so far away! Levi and William were in Weakley County, but she didn’t want to settle there. Eventually, she decided to remain in Williamson County, Tennessee where the two Rhodas were living as well as her own natural brother, Joseph Spence. (He will be covered in Part 3.) The youngest member of the family–Elisha Bell Spence–was still living with his mother when she died. (He will also be covered in Part 4. The Conclusion will then follow.)

And there was another reason for her choice of Williamson County, Tennessee–a man by the name of James Garrett, who was had been living in the area for a while, and who was a friend of her family.

James Garrett (1806-bef. 1860)

Finding James Garrett was no easy matter! I thought it would be a simple job. But the only two documents I have for him are the marriage document referenced above and the 1850 Census for Haywood County, Tennessee. I could have made this a really simple story by introducing those two documents followed by a conclusion–two paragraphs at most. However, my sense of “shoveling” and “digging” prevailed, and I started doing just  that. The 1850 Census notes that James Garrett was born in North Carolina in 1804, and that he was living with his wife and children in Haywood County, Tennessee. The more I dug, the more Garretts I spaded up. And the more Garrets I spaded up, the deeper I had to dig.

What was so special about Haywood County? I wondered.

According to the Wikipedia site:

Haywood County was created from part of Madison County in 1823–24, and was named for Tennessee judge and historian John Haywood. Haywood County was part of Madison County when the Tennessee General Assembly created it in 1823–24. (Later, portions of Haywood would be carved out to create Lauderdale and Crockett Counties.) The legislature designated Brownsville as the county seat.

Farming, especially of cotton, was the basis for the local economy for much of its history. Until the Civil War, this meant a plantation system dependent upon slave labor; after the war, tenant farmers and sharecroppers took the place of actual slavery(8).

The reference to Madison County did not escape my notice. Shortly after the 1830 Census in Davidson County, Tennessee, the Elisha Spence family moved to Madison County. While shuffling through Haywood County records, I discovered a number of Garretts residing in Haywood County, the majority settling in District 10.

And that is where James and Jane lived in 1850, I thought. Those Garretts must have been related to James, and they came from North Carolina! But from where?

***

James Garrett was actually a twin born in Greene County, Tennessee in 1806. His biological parents were Jacob Garrett (1780-1838) and Barbara Jack (b. 1783), who were married in Greene County, Tennessee November 11, 1805(9). Jacob was born in 1780 in Buckingham County, Virginia, and he died before March 5, 1838 in Greene County, Tennessee. Barbara gave birth to twins in 1806: a son named John, who did not live, and James. Apparently, Barbara was ill after the double birth, an illness that lasted a long time.. The infant James went to live with his uncle and aunt in Person County, North Carolina: Samuel Garrett, Jr. (1772-1858) and Elizabeth Broughton (1778-1858). James was raised in their household with their children. I doubt that he had any contact with his natural parents. His parents were happy that he was settled in a good household. [Note: I will cover Samuel and his family after I finish with Jacob.]

Jacob and his brother Samuel came from a prominent Garrett family from Chesterfield and Buckingham Counties of Virginia. The records have been scrambled regarding that family. Everyone has a different opinion about them since so many of the original Buckingham, Virginia records are missing or destroyed(10).  Briefly, their ancestry follows:

Jacob and Samuel were the sons of John Garrett (1743-1831)  and Elizabeth Amonet/Amonett (1743-1789). I seriously doubt that Samuel was Elizabeth’s son since John and Elizabeth were married December 7, 1778 in Chesterfield County, Virginia. Samuel was born in 1772, as is verified on the 1850 Giles County, Tennessee Census(11). Some people have attempted to compensate for this by changing Samuel’s birthdate to 1783 or 1785. Doing that throws everything else off, however. Since Samuel was the oldest child, I believe John had an earlier marriage and his first wife’s name is  unknown.  The children of John Garrett and Elizabeth Amonet/Amonett follow:

  • Samuel Garrett (1772-1858). About to be discussed. Probably by John’s first wife.
  • Jacob Garrett (1780-1838). Under discussion
  • Pleasant Garrett (1781-1826). Pleasant was born September 10, 1781 in North Carolina, and he died December 20, 1826 in Jefferson County, Tennessee. His wife was Margaret Peggy Brevard (1793-1876). Their children were: (a) John Garrett (b. 1810); (b) James Garrett (b. 1811); (c) John B. Campbell Garrett (1813-1891); (d) Priscilla Garrett (1814-1894); (e) William Moore Garrett (b. 1816); (f) Elizabeth Jane Garrett (b. 1820); (g) Albert Francis Marion Garrett (1822-1891); (h) Pleasant Jasper Garrett (b. 1824); (i) Margaret Jerusha Garrett, who died in 1907.
  • Elizabeth Garrett (1784-1860). She was born in Virginia, and she died in Rockcastle, Madison, Kentucky. Her records are really confusing, so I won’t extend her line. John and Elizabeth Amonett Garrett had a daughter named Elizabeth. That is the only information I can verify.
  • Margaret Garrett (b. 1789). I have no additional information.

[Note: The family information for John Garrett and Elizabeth Amonet/Amonett comes from The Garrett Family of Craighead Co. and Greene County, Arkansas website](12).

John Garrett was the son of Isaac Garrett (1719-1775) and Ann (Rux??). Isaac was the son of John Smith Garrett (1690-1743) and Susannah Featherstone Burton (b. 1695) of Amelia County, Virginia(13).

***

By 1808, Jacob Garrett and Barbara Jack began having additional children of their own.  I acquired a copy of Jacob’s will in order to verify them:

  • Sarah Elizabeth “Sally” Garrett (1808-1851). Sally was born in Greene County, Tennessee in 1808, and she died in 1851 in Navarro, Ellis County, Texas. Her husband was Abijah Smith Gibbs (1805-1860). Their children were: (a) William Riley Gibbs (1827-1892); (b) Elisabeth Gibbs, born 1830; (c) Mary Anne Gibbs, born 1833; (d) Barbara G. Gibbs, born 1835; (e) Sarah J. Gibbs, born 1837; (f) James Patrick Gibbs (1839-1925); (g) John S. Gibbs, born 1841; (h) Martha R. Gibbs, born 1843; (I) Drucilla E. Gibbs, born 1845; (j) Lucy C. Gibbs, born 1849.
  • Elizabeth J. Garrett (1810-1870). [Note: Elizabeth’s records are often jumbled with her sister Margaret. Jacob’s will indicates they were separate individuals]. Elizabeth was born in November 1810 in Greene County, Tennessee, and she died in 1870 in Liberty, Bollinger, Missouri. Her husband was William Youngblood (1806-1870). Their children were: (a) Alfred Mory Youngblood (1827-1864); (b) Son Youngblood (1829-1829); (c) John Garet Youngblood (1831-1890); (d) Dr. James M. Youngblood (1833-1879); (e) Martin V. Youngblood (1841-1881); (f) Barbara “Barbary” Youngblood (b. 1843); (g) Mary Magdalene Youngblood (1844-1873); (h) William O. Youngblood (1846-1903); (I) Elizabeth Youngblood (b. 1851); (j) Sarah A. Youngblood (b. 1851); (k) Emma Youngblood (b. 1853); (l) Lincoln Youngblood (b. 1854).
  • Margaret Garrett (1811-bef. 1860). Margaret was born in Greene County, Tennessee in 1811, and she died before 1860 in Greene County, Tennessee. About 1825, she married a Waddell (sometimes spelled Waddle). He died before 1827. As yet, I haven’t discovered his full name. [Note: This was an interesting discovery for me since my husband Howard lived just outside Greenville, Tennessee when he was a boy, and his best friend was a Waddell. We’ve been back to Greene County on two different trips, and enjoyed the hospitality there immensely. We also toured the old town of  Jonesboro and saw Davy Crockett’s birthplace there.  I understand the Waddells were among the early pioneers in the area. Some of the Waddells, Crocketts and Garretts intermarried.  No doubt, Howard’s Waddell friends were in some way related to the Waddell who married Margaret Garrett! On July 23, 1827, Margaret Garrett Waddell married Allen Kennedy (1809-1833) in Greene County, Tennessee). Allen was born in 1809 in Greene County, and he died in Greene County April 19, 1833. According to the Greene County, Tennessee Cemetery Records:
Name Allen Kennedy
Relation husband
Relative Margaret Kennedy
Birth Date 1809
Death Date 19 Apr 1833
Age 24 Years
Comments Sacred to the Memory of Allen Kennedy
Cemetery Name Greene County Tomb Stone Records Mt. Zion Cemetery
Cemetery Description Located 9 miles southeast of Greeneville, on road connecting the John Sevier Highway and Jones Bridge roads in the 22nd Civil District of Greens County. This cemetery is on the grounds of the United Presbyterian Church at that point(14).

Allen and Margaret had the following children: (a) Jacob Martin Kennedy, born 1828–who is mentioned in his grandfather’s will as Jacob Kennedy; (b) John Wesley Kennedy (1831-1896); and (c) Martha Kennedy (1833-1850).

  • John Garrett (1813-bef 1838). John was born in 1813 in Greene County, Tennessee, and he died before 1838 in Greene County. His wife’s name is unknown, but they had a son named William Jacob Garrett, who was born before 1838 in Greene County, Tennessee, and who is mentioned in his grandfather’s will as William Jacob Garrett.
  • Magdelene Garrett (1815-aft 1838). Magdelene was born in Greene County, Tennessee, and she died after 1838 in Greene County, Tennessee. I have no additional information about her. She is named in her father’s will.

[Note:  Information about the children of Jacob Garrett and Barbara Jack is from his will dated January 26, 1838 and entered for probate March 5, 1838. His will mentions his wife Barbary; his grandson “William Jacob, son of my son John Garrett, Deceased”; daughter Sarah; daughter Elizabeth; daughter Margaret; daughter Magdalene; the fact that daughter Margaret married a Kennedy and had a child: Jacob Kennedy(15).]

Some people think Jacob had a second marriage–that he married Barbara Jack in 1805 (which he did), and that he married a Rachel Stone in Madison County, Kentucky in 1806 (which he did not). That was a different Jacob Garrett. This Jacob had only one wife–Barbara Jack. She was the mother of all of his children, and she was still alive when he died in 1838, according to his will. He settled in Greene County, Tennessee, and he stayed there!

His will  does not mention the oldest surviving twin, James Garrett (b. 1806), but James was placed in the Samuel Garrett household as an infant where he bonded with Samuel’s family. It is doubtful that there was any relationship between James and his real parents. James grew up presuming that Samuel and  Elizabeth were his real parents and that he was born in Person County, North Carolina. It didn’t bother him that one brother had the name of James. People often used the same name in the same generation; the second James was James B. Garrett. I have yet to discover James Garret’s middle name, although it may have been Harvey since his son was given that name: James Harvey Garrett.

***

Samuel Garrett, Jr. was born in 1772 in Chesterfield or Buckingham County, Virginia, and he died in 1758 in Pulaski, Giles County, Tennessee. On September 3, 1798, he married Elizabeth Broughton (1778-1858) in Amelia County, Virginia(16). After their marriage, they moved to Person County, North Carolina, where most of their children were born:

  • Parthenia Garrett (1799-1840). Parthenia was born in Person County, North Carolina about 1799, and she died in Giles County, Tennessee in 1840. On June 22, 1820, she married John Alfrod Tillman (1790-1855) in Giles County, Tennessee(10). Their children were: (a) Harriet Tilman, born 1822; (b) William Turner Tillman (1822-1892); (c) John Alexander Tillman (1825-1884); (d) James Henderson Tillman (1827-1884); (e) George Washington Tillman (1829-1919)(17).
  • Addison Broughton Garrett (1800-1874). Addison was born in Person County, North Carolina about 1800, and he died in 1874 in Giles County, Tennessee. His records are sometimes confused with his brother, James B. Garrett, who, as already mentioned, is not the James Garrett under discussion here. His wife was Elizabeth McKay (1800-1850), whom he married about 1815. Their children were: (a) James Garrett (1815-1855)–not the James Garrett under discussion here either; (b) Mary Ann Garrett (1825-1878); (c) Henry S. Garrett (1827-1875); (d) Elizabeth B. Garrett (1831-1866); (e) John Thomas Garrett (1833-1878); (f) Nancy Garrett (1836-1878); (g) Isham Stephens Garrett (1838-1863); (h) Abegale Garrett (1843-1926); (I) Ethlinda Ann Garrett (1848-1878)(18). Addison appears to have had two additional marriages: Martha Keath on October 24, 1856 in Giles County, Tennessee, and Mary Gordon on March 14, 1865 in Giles County, Tennessee(19).
  • James B. Garrett (1802-1891). James was born October 6, 1802 in Person County, North Carolina, and he died September 4, 1891 in Lauderdale County, Tennessee. His wife was Harriet Tilman (b. 1823). Their children were: (a) Martha Ann Garrett (1848-1889); (b) John Jackson Garrett (1851-1931); (c) Elizabeth Phoebe Garrett (b. 1853); (d) Samuel Garrett (b. 1860); (e) Nancy J. Garrett (b. 1861). As noted, he is not the James Garrett under discussion here  and is the other brother with the same first name. By 1836, he appears on the tax records for Haywood County, Tennessee(20). By 1850, he was back in Giles County(21). By 1880, he relocated to Lauderdale County, Tennessee, where he appears on the Census(22). James B. Garrett died September 4, 1891 in Lauderdale County, Tennessee, and he is buried in the Crossroads Cemetery, Ripley, Lauderdale County, Tennessee(23).
  • Henderson Alexander Garrett (1807-1860). This is one of the families who settled in Haywood County. Henderson was born in Person County, North Carolina in 1807, and he died after 1860 in Haywood County, Tennessee. His wife was Amanda Rickman, who was born in 1812 in Tennessee. [Note: The 1850 Census for Haywood County, Tennessee shows James Garrett living next door to a large family of Rickmans. I believe they were Amanda’s relatives(24).] Their children were: (a)William Garrett (1835-1864); (b) Marcus A. Garrett (born 1838); (c) Augustus Garrett (b. 1839); (d) Elizabeth Garrett (1840-1870); (e) Mary E. Garrett (b. 1844); (f) Henderson Garrett (1846-1864); (g) James Garrett (b. 1848). Henderson and his family appear on the 1850 census for District 10, Haywood County, Tennessee(25) as well as the 1860 Census for District 10, Haywood County, Tennessee(26)
  • Mary Martha Garrett (1809-1860). Mary was born in Person County, North Carolina in 1809, and she died after 1860 in District 10, Haywood County, Tennessee. Her husband was Isaac Ishom (Isom) Rainey (1807-1853). He was born May 4, 1807 in Brunswick, Virginia, and he died January 8, 1853 in District 10, Haywood County, Tennessee(27). He is buried in the Crossroads Cemetery, Ripley, Lauderdale County, Tennessee. [Note: A number of these people are buried in that cemetery who all died about the same period of time.11

I have an idea that James Garrett, his wife Jane Spence, and their two children are buried there without markers.] Mary Martha last appears on the 1860 Census in Haywood County with several of her children. Mary Martha and Isaac Isom’s children were: (a) William Charles Rainey (1827-1927); (b) Adolphus Rainey (1832); (c) Addison Levi (A. L.) Rainey (b. 1835); (d) Frances Rainey (b. 1836); (e) Samuel Rainey (b. 1838); (f) James W. Rainey (b. 1839); (g) Elizabeth Rainey (1844-1848); (h) Martha Rainey (1847-1856); (I) Henderson Alexander Rainey (1848-1906); (j) Amanda J. Rainey (1850-1929). Mary may have married a Hendren prior to her marriage to Isom. Her Find-a-Grave Memorial follows:

Birth: 1809 North Carolina, USA
Death: unknown Lauderdale County Tennessee, USA
Wife of Isom/Isham Rainey. She would have died sometime between 1860-1870 in Lauderdale County.Isom and Mary Rainey had children: William C. Rainey, b. 1830 Giles Co. A.dison L. Rainey (twin) Adolphus Rainey (twin) Delicia Frances Rainey mar. Joseph Hendren Samuel Rainey, b. 1837 Giles or Madison Co. James A. Rainey, b. 1839 Giles or Madison Co. Elizabeth Rainey, b. 1844 Madison Co. Martha Rainey, b. 1847 Madison or Haywood Co. Henderson A. Rainey, b. 1848 Haywood Co. Amanda J. Rainey, mar. William CoffmanFamily links: Spouse: Isom Rainey (____ – 1853)Children: Addison L. Rainey (1835 – 1911)* Samuel B Rainey (1837 – 1911)* James W Rainey (1839 – 1913)**Calculated relationship
Burial: Crossroads Cemetery Ripley Lauderdale County Tennessee, USA
Created by: Southern Roots ღ Record added: Sep 14, 2015 Find A Grave Memorial# 152316667(28)
  • Phoebe (Phebe) Garrett (1815-bef. 1860). Phoebe Garrett was born about 1815 in Person County, North Carolina, and she died before 1860 in Haywood County, Tennessee. She appears to have never married and was living with her parents in Giles County in 1850(29). Her parents both died in 1858. After her parents’ deaths, she moved to Haywood County, Tennessee, where other relatives were living.
  • Nancy Garrett (1817-1858). Nancy was born in Person County, North Carolina in 1817, and she died in Giles County, Tennessee in 1858. She does not appear on the 1850 Census in the Samuel Garrett household(29). I do not know whether she married or remained single.
  • Samuel Jackson Garrett (1818-1895). Samuel Jackson Garrett was born in Giles County, Tennessee–indicating the Samuel Garrett family had moved there by then–and he died April 6, 1895 in Gates, Lauderdale County, Tennessee. He is buried in the Crossroads Cemetery, Ripley, Lauderdale, Tennessee. His Find-a-Grave Memorial follows:
Birth: Oct. 18, 1818 Giles County Tennessee, USA
Death: Apr. 6, 1895 Gates Lauderdale County Tennessee, USA
Wife: Mary McColpin Garrett Father: Samuel Garrett Mother: Elizabeth Broughton Garrett Children: James Monroe, Alra R., Ira, Henderson, Letitia, Vera, Wesley
Burial: Crossroads Cemetery Ripley Lauderdale County Tennessee, USA
Created by: Christy Ball Record added: Jul 13, 2001 Find A Grave Memorial# 5608749(30)

Samuel’s wife was Mary McColpin (1836-1897). Their children were: (a) Monroe Garrett (b. 1862); (b) Alva Garrett (b. 1864); (c) Alra R. Garrett (1864-1906); (d) Ira Garrett (b. 1866); (e) Henderson Garrett (b. 1869); (f) Lutita Garrett (b. 1872); (g) Bera Garrett (b. 1875).

  • Elizabeth A. Garrett (1828-1858). Elizabeth was born in 1828 in Giles County, Tennessee, and she died in 1858 in Giles County. While her name appears on an accepted list of Samuel and Elizabeth’s children, I can’t help but think she was a grandchild. If her date of birth is correct, Samuel would have been seventy-eight, and Elizabeth would have been seventy-two. Likewise, a young woman named Timmantha Garrett (b. 1838) appears on the same 1850 Census in Samuel’s household(31). Timmantha disappears from the records while many people believe Elizabeth lived until 1858. Then Elizabeth disappears from the records. Unless the dates of birth are wrong, these two women were probably grandchildren. Perhaps Samuel and Elizabeth took in a number of orphaned children from the various Garrett families over the years.

The Life and Times of James Garrett

And so it seemed only natural for James Garrett to accompany the Samuel Garrett family from Person County, North Carolina to Giles County, Tennessee. The move to Tennessee occurred around 1818 when James was twelve years old. Giles County sounded like an interesting place. James was eager for excitement.

A brief history of Giles County from the Wikipedia site follows:

Giles County is named after William Branch Giles, a Senator from Virginia who sponsored the admission of Tennessee as the sixteenth state into the Union. He also sponsored the building of the city and courthouse, which has burned four times. The current courthouse was built in 1859 by the George Moore and Sons company. It cost about thirty thousand dollars to complete. Though it stood through the Civil War, it suffered much damage. One of Giles County’s local heroes is James McCallum, who served as Grandmaster of the Tennessee Masons, a member of the Confederate Congress, and mayor. He lived in Giles County for seventy years.

Until Maury County was established in November 1807, the area of the future Giles County was considered to be part of Williamson County. Two years after the formation of Maury County, Giles County was created from southern Maury County on November 14, 1809 by an act of the State Legislature. Nearly half of the new county lay in Chickasaw territory until September 1816(32)

The reference to Williamson County quickly caught my attention. Many of my Spence and related families lived in the area. Samuel Garrett often traveled to Williamson on business, as well as to Davidson County. Young James no doubt accompanied him. And it was on one such excursion where Samuel Garrett met Elisha Spence, and young James soon met the rest of the family. The two families often got together. James Garrett and Mary Jane Spence probably knew one another for some time before “romantic sparks” began to fly between them. Then in 1830, the Elisha Spence family moved to Madison County.

“If you go over there, let me know. I’d like to tag along!” James told Samuel one day.

“Hmmm! I wonder why!” Samuel Smiled.

Elisha died in 1835. His family moved from Madison to Marshall County. And by 1836, James B. Garrett appeared on the tax records for Haywood County. James accompanied him whenever he went over there, stopping by Marshall to see Jane. Then Jane’s mother died in early 1842. After the funeral, she told James she was moving to Williamson County where two of her sisters and her brother lived. James and Jane were married September 21, 1842 in Williamson County. By then, a number of the Garrett brothers were moving to Haywood County. James and Jane would move there as well.

They had two children who appear to be twins: Harvey and Sarah, born in 1844. They last appear on the 1850 Census for Haywood County in District 10(33).

James was a farmer, although I’ve read some glorious accounts focused upon who he may have been. Those accounts also include his wife Jane. She bears the McDearmon surname in some accounts, even though people making that claim use the 1842 marriage record clearly showing her surname as SPENCE. Mary Jane Spence was NEVER a McDearmon–probably the reason why I spent so much time working on this article during the week!

One wild story connects James Garrett with a Rev. James Garrett, a minister in the Anglican Church, who spent years preaching in Tasmania. (James and Jane were Baptists, Methodists, or Presbyterians, and they  stayed in Tennessee). That same story connects the daughter Sarah with two marriages: one to a Jones in Eastern Tennessee, and the other to someone in Australia where they had a number of children. Those Garretts did exist in Australia, but they were not James Garrett (1806-1860), Mary Jane Spence (1813-1860) or their children Harvey and Sarah! All four members of my James Garrett family disappear in Haywood County, Tennessee before the 1860 Census.

When you stop and think about it–I decided–a number of people disappeared in Haywood County around 1860!

While James Garrett, Jane Spence and the children disappear before 1860, the 1860 Mortality Chart for Haywood County, Tennessee lists pneumonia as  the cause of numerous deaths that year in District 10(34). The Garretts may have died of pneumonia.  Those farms were all close together and family members frequently interacted with one another. The Garretts may have even died in the early 1850s. Isom Rainey died in 1853. He and his wife were in District 10 in 1850. Neither James nor Jane nor their children appear on any 1860 Census that I have studied!

I don’t know where this family is buried. A number of the Garretts and their relatives are buried in Crossroads Cemetery, Ripley, Lauderdale, Tennessee, so I suspect these Garretts are buried there as well. Many graves are unmarked. As I recall, over 200 people are buried in Crossroads.

One thing I definitely know is this: James Garrett (1806-1860), Mary Jane Spence (1813-1860) or their children certainly aren’t buried in Tasmania!

 

This article continues with Part 3: Joseph Spence (1816-1860)

 

References

(1)  Official Copy of James Garrett and Mary Jane Spence Marriage Record. Bond posted: 20 Sep 1842. Marriage: 21 Sep 1842, Williamson County, Tennessee. Obtained from the Tennessee State Library & Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.

(2) Tennessee State Marriage Records for James Garrett and Jane Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) 1850 Census for Haywood County, Tennessee, the James Garrett Family. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) 1850 Census for Haywood County, Tennessee, the James Garrett Family. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Elisha Spence Estate Inventory, dated November 1835, Madison County, Tennessee. Listed on the records as “Li Spens.” Official copy obtained from the Tennessee State Library & Archives, Nashville, Tennessee.

(6) 1840 Census for Jane Spence, Marshall County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(7)  Summary of 1840 Census for Jane Spence household, Marshall County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(8) Haywood County, Tennessee, from the Wikipedia site. Wikipedia.org. Article last modified 29 Aug 2015. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haywood_County,_Tennessee

(9) Tennessee State Marriage Records for Jacob Garrett and Barbary Jack, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) Early Virginia Garretts–portions on Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) 1850 Census for Samuel and Elizabeth Garrett, Giles County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) Bill Crouch (1997). Garrett Family of Craighead Co. and Greene County, Arkansas. Created 1997. Genweb.com. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.couchgenweb.com/family/garrett.htm

(13)Bill Crouch (1997). Garrett Family of Craighead Co. and Greene County, Arkansas. Created 1997. Genweb.com. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.couchgenweb.com/family/garrett.htm

(14) Greene County, Tennessee Cemetery Records about Allen Kennedy. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) Tennessee, Wills and Probate Records, 1779-2008 about Jacob Garrett. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16) Virginia Marriage Records, 1700-1850 about Samuel Garrett and Elizabeth Broughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.

(17) The record and genealogy of the (Tilghman-Tillman-Tilman-Tilmon) family, 1225-1938 : compiled from an original mss. by James D. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(18) Bill Crouch (1997). Garrett Family of Craighead Co. and Greene County, Arkansas. Created 1997. Genweb.com. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.couchgenweb.com/family/garrett.htm

(19) Tennessee State Marriage Records about Addison Garrett and Mary Gordon. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(20) Early Tennessee Tax Records; James Garrett (1836-Haywood). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(21) 1850 Census for Giles County, Tennessee, James B. Garrett. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(22) 1880 Censes of Lauderdale County, Tennessee, James B. Garrett. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(23) Find-a-Grave Index for James B. Garrett. Ancestry.cim, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(24) 1850 Census for James Garrett, Haywood County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(25) 1850 Census for Henderson Garrett, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(26) 1860 Census for Henderson Garrett, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(27) Isaac Ishom (Isom) Rainey Find-a-Grave Memorial. Index at Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(28) Mary Garrett Hendren Rainey Find-a-Grave Memorial. Find-a-Grave.com. Created by: SouthernRoots Record added: Sep 14, 2015, Find A Grave Memorial# 152316667. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.findagrave.com

(29) 1850 Census for Samuel Garrett, Giles County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(30) Samuel Jackson Garrett Find-a-Grave Memorial # 5608749.  Find-a-Grave.com Website. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(31) 1850 Census for Samuel Garrett, Giles County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(32) Giles County, Tennessee from the Wikipedia Site: Wikipedia.org.  Last Updated: 29 Aug 2015. Date Accessed: 26 Sep 2015. Available online at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giles_County,_Tennessee

(33) 1850 Census, District 10, Haywood County, Tennessee for James Garrett. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(34) 1860 Mortality Schedule, Haywood County, Tennessee. Genealogy Trails Website. Date Accessed: 28 Sep 2015. Available online at http://genealogytrails.com/tenn/haywood/cenmort1860.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–The Second Family: Part One–Angeline Spence (1811-1860) and David Lemasters (1795-1848)

Lewis & Clark Statue, St. Charles, Missouri--along the River. (I've had this in my files for a number of years. No information about original source.)

Lewis & Clark Statue, St. Charles, Missouri–overlooking the River. (I’ve had this in my files for a number of years. No information about original source.)

 

Robert Bell came from Guilford County, North Carolina in 1783 and settled near Bledsoe’s Lick in Sumner County. Later he moved to Mill Creek, 10 miles Southeast of Nashville. He died February 1816 of small pox, aged about 85 years. He was twice married and had a total of 19 children: six by his first wife and 13  by his second wife, Mary. His first wife’s name is not known(1)

Capt. Robert Bell was born December 1736 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died March 26, 1816 in Davidson County, Tennessee. He was the son of John Bell (1710-1750), who was born in New York and who died in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and Elizabeth Fell. His first wife was Katherine Walker (1742-1773). Their children were: (1) Mary Bell (1763-1827); (2) Sarah Bell, who died in 1821; (3) Rebecca Bell, who died in 1816; (4) John Bell, who died in 1829; (5) Abraham Bell, who died in 1769; (6) Samuel Bell (1766-1836); (7) Ann Bell (1768-1860); (8) Catherine Walker Bell (1770-1857); (9) Robert Fielding Bell (1773-1853). [Note: I did not extend these lines because I am uncertain how accurate they are!]

His second wife was Mary Jane Boyd, who was born in 1754 in North Carolina, and who died in childbirth July 24, 1795 in Davidson County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of John Boyd (1720-1766) and Rebecca (1730-1758) Their children were:

  1. James Bell (1777-1823). James was born August 23, 1777 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died June 23, 1823 in Wilson County, Tennessee. His wife was Mary Dean (1777-1829)
  2. Hugh F. Bell (1779-1850). Hugh was born May 1, 1779 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died in 1850 in Pontotoc, Mississippi. His wife was Margaret McKinney (1781-1840). Their children were: (a) Caroline Bell (1802-1887); (b) Zilpha Bell (1803-1889); (c) Alfred Bell, born 1805; (d) Paris Dooley Bell (b. 1807); (e) Florence M. Bell (1812-1872); (f) Jane Bell, born 1814; (g) Robert Allen Bell (1816-1896); (h) Mary Boyd Bell (1817-1864); (I) James Daniel Bell (1818-1882); (j) Adeline Bell, born 1827.
  3. Daniel Bell (1780-1814). Daniel was born in Guilford County, North Carolina in 1780, and he died in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1814.
  4. Francis Marion Bell (1782-1866). Francis was born November 23, 1782 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died June 21, 1866 in Talula, Menard, Illinois. His first wife was Peggy Bails (1789-1807), and his second wife was Elizabeth Allen (1790-1835), by whom he had his children.  Their children were: (a) Margaret Patsy Bell (1809-1892); (b) Margaret Bell (1810-1885); (c) Thomas Allen Bell (1811-1870); (d) Mary Bell (1812-1902); (e) Andrew Jackson Bell (b. 1814); (f) Robert Washington Bell (1814-1845); (g) Daniel R. Bell (1815-1868); (h) Zachariah Bell (1817-1854); (I) Francis Marion Bell (1819-1879); (j) Margery Ann Bell (1822-1858); (k) John Jefferson Bell (1823-1875); (l) William Carrol bell (1826-1900).
  5. William Bell (1784-1850). William was born in Guilford County, North Carolina about 1784, and he died after 1850 in Sumner County, Tennessee.
  6. David Bell (1786-1863). David was born July 2, 1786 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died August 1, 1863 in Robertson County, Tennessee.
  7. Thomas Bell (1789-1879). Thomas was born September 13, 1789 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died in September 1879 of pericarditis in Rutherford County, Tennessee. His first was Martha Edmiston (1797-1845). Their children were: (a) George D. Bell (b. 1818); (b) Robert F. Bell (b. 1823) and (c) Lycurgus Bell. His second wife’s name was Catherine, born 1816.
  8. Nathaniel Bell (1790-1844). Nathaniel was born May 3, 1790 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died in 1844. His wife was Eleanor Johnston (1780-1867).
  9. Sarah “Sally” Bell (1792-1848). Sarah was born in Tennessee in 1792, and she died March 3, 1848 in Greene County, Illinois.  Her husband was John Allen (1792-18410.
  10. Mary Jane Bell (1795-1842). [The subject under discussion here.]

 

Elisha Spence (1776-1835) and Mary Jane Bell (1795-1842)

Mary Jane Bell was born July 24, 1795, probably in Davidson County, Tennessee. In 1810, her father took her to Elisha Spence’s home. The two families knew one another from their time in North Carolina, and they reunited in Davidson County, Tennessee. They lived close to one another south of Nashville. Elisha’s wife had just died in childbirth, and Elisha was in desperate need of help since he had several small children in the household. Jane became a nanny to the children; she bonded with the family. On October 25, 1810, Elisha and Jane Bell married in Davidson County, Tennessee(2). Four children were born of this marriage.

The rest of this article is devoted to those four children and their families. It has been divided into several parts. This one is devoted to the oldest daughter: Angeline Penelope Spence.

.

Angeline Penelope Spence (1811-1860) and David Lemasters (1795-1848)

Angeline Penelope Spence was born about 1811 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died before 1860 in St. Charles, St. Louis, Missouri. She appears to have idolized her older brothers: Samuel and Daniel, and she bonded well with Milly Catherine. She also idolized Levi, but he relocated to North Carolina, so she saw little of him until later. And she became a big sister to the younger children, helping her mother manage the household. A young woman her age appears in the Elisha Spence household on the 1820(3) and 1830 Census(4). Shortly after the 1830 Census, the Elisha Spence family relocated to Madison County, Tennessee, where Elisha died in November 1835(5). After Elisha’s death, the older children began planning their move to Missouri, which they achieved by 1837(6). Angeline wanted to go with them, but her mother did not want to leave Tennessee. By 1840, Jane relocated to Marshall County, Tennessee, where she appears on the Census with her children(7).  Angeline probably moved to Marshall County with her mother; a young woman approximately her age is in the household. The 1840 Census is the last record I could find for her mother. In all likelihood, Jane Bell Spence died in 1842–the year Angeline relocated to Missouri and joined her siblings there. 1842 was also the year when Angeline met her future husband.

David Lemasters was born in 1795 in Virginia, and he died in 1848 in St. Charles, St. Louis, Missouri. His parents were Isaac Lemaster, who was born in Charles County, Maryland in 1748 and who died in St. Charles, St. Louis, Missouri in 1802,  and Nancy Ann Scott (born 1750). His paternal grandparents were Isaac Lemasters, born in Charles County, Maryland in 1728; died in 1802 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and Ann Flint (1730-1802). His paternal great-grandparents were Joseph Lemaster, born in St. Marys, Maryland in 1693; died 1730 in Charles County, Maryland, and Catherine Ward (1695-1730). David came from a large family of true pioneers, many of whom were trailblazers and over-mountain men.

The family of Isaac Lemaster and Nancy Ann Scott follow: [Note: These family records have been terribly confused. I am only including the individuals I can verify.]

  1. Mary Lemasters (1769-1837). Mary was born in Allegany County, Maryland in 1769, and she died in Pike County, Missouri in 1837. She had two husbands: Nathaniel Clark (1772-1792) and Thomas Jefferson Mackey (1774-1858), by whom she had her child: Mary Mackey (1801-1879). According to a biographical account of Thomas Jefferson Mackey:

Hon. Harrison G. Mackey, one of the old and prominent citizens of Pike County. . . .His father was Thomas J. Mackey, born in North Carolina, July 26, 1809. He in turn was the son of THOMAS Sr., also a native of the same State and of Irish ancestry. The latter was born in 1774, and came to Missouri in 1814 from Tennessee, where he had made his home for about ten years. He located in what is now St. Charles County, farming there for about two years, when he moved to what is now Pike County and Calumet Township. He had made a claim of a quarter section of land, but being prospered in his farming interests he added to this acreage until he bacame the possessor of three hundred and twenty acres. Thomas, Sr., was a very public-spirited man, helping forward all movements calculated to aid in the development of his community, and among the enterprises in which he was interested was the first grist mill in the section. He was an intimate friend of Gen. Jackson, and consequently was a strong Democrat in politics. He was a leader in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in his locality, in the faith of which he died in November, 1858, at the home of his son-in-law in Marion County. He was married to a Miss Masters, and to them were born eleven children. (note – errors noted are that his son Thomas J. was born in Tennessee not North Carolina and he married {Mary} Lemasters not Masters cs (8).

2. Benjamin Evans Lemasters (1784-1842). Benjamin was born in 1780, and he died November 10, 1842 in St. Charles, Missouri. I’m going to extend his line because some of the research I did years ago applies to Benjamin’s household and not to David Lemasters’. According to the Swearingen, Lemasters, Francis, Winfrey Family History Book under “Notes for Benjamin Lemasters:

Benjamin Evans Lemasters: Benjamin served in the military on Jun. 7,1812 in Boone’s Rangers, Missouri Territory. This statement is before the list of men in the unit: “Muster Roll of a company of mounted Rangers under the command of Captain Nathan Boone in the service of the United States commanded by him from 7th June to 31 July 1812.” Listed as a Corporal is Evan Lemasters. He appeared on the census in 1830 and 1840 in St. Charles Co., Missouri(9).

[Note: Nathan Boone was a son of Daniel Boone.]

The Lemasters, Francis, Winfrey book states that Benjamin was born in 1780 in Tennessee; other sources claim that he was born in Monongalia County, Virginia. The Lemasters book identifies his wife as Nancy Jones, who was born about 1786 in Blount County, Tennessee. Other sources identify his wife as Adria Journey (b. 1781), who may have been a second wife. The Lemasters, Francis, Winfrey book identifies the  children of Benjamin Lemasters and Nancy Jones as:

i. Isaac Lawrence  Lemasters, born Bet. 1816 – 1820 in Missouri; died Feb 2, 1857 in Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri.

ii. Nancy Lemasters, born Bet. 1811 -1815.

iii. Mary Lemasters, born Dec 21, 1815 in Missouri; died 1890 in Marysville, Nodaway CO., Missouri.

iv. Daughter Lemasters, born Bet. 1802- 1817.

v. Audrey Lemasters.

vi. Benjamin Franklin Lemasters, born Nov 10, 1824; died 1856 in Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri.

vii. Amanda “Manda” Lemasters.

viii. Martha Lemasters, born Bet. 1821 – 1825.

The two most important references for my purposes here center upon Isaac Lawrence Lemasters (b. bet 1816-1820); d. 1857) and Nancy Jane Lemasters (1815-1860).

Isaac Lawrence Lemasters was born in St. Charles, Missouri in 1817, and he died February 2, 1857 in Carrollton, Carroll, Missouri. His first wife was Jane Henry (1823-1850), by whom he had his children, and his second wife was Elizabeth Elliott, about whom nothing is known. The children of Isaac Lemasters and Jane Henry were: (a) Abraham Lemasters (1843-1858); (b) John A. Lemasters (1844-1858); (c) David Lemasters (1848-aft 1860); (d) Georgeann “Ann” Lemasters (1849-1904); (e) George W. Lemasters (1849-1912).  David, Ann and George all appear on the 1860 Census for Isaac’s sister, Nancy, in Carroll County, Missouri(10). She was a widow, since her husband had died the previous year, and she took in Isaac’s three children with her own.

Nancy was born in St. Charles, Missouri in 1815, and she died after August 29, 1860 in Sugar Tree, Carroll County, Missouri. Her husband was William H. Harrison (1815-1859). Their children were: (a) Sophia Harrison (1838-1903); (b) Andrew E. Harrison (b. 1839); (c) Audrey Elizabeth Harrison (1840-1928); (d) William H. Harrison (b. 1846); Nancy Harrison (1846-1893); and Amanda T. Harrison (b. 1849).

(When I first started doing this research, I thought David, Ann and George were David Lemasters’ children. They were not.)

Returning to the children of Isaac Lemasters and Nancy Ann Scott:

3. Nancy Ann Lemaster (1786-1860). Nancy was born in 1786. Some people think she was born in Virginia. She died in Pike County, Missouri April 27, 1860. Her husband was John Mackey (1766-1840), and their son was Thomas Mackey (1809-1876).

4. David Lemasters (1795-1848). Under discussion here.

David Lemasters was born in Virginia in 1795, and he died January 7, 1848 in St. Charles, Missouri. David was a wanderer and an adventurer. According to The Jasper County History:

The First Permanent Settlements

The honor of having made the first permanent settlement in Jasper county belongs to Thacker Vivion, an emigrant from Kentucky, who located at the spring at the foot of the hill in Sarcoxie, about a stone­s throw southwest of the railroad depot at that place. Vivion is said to have been the first white man who settled permanently in the region of country west of the Turnback River in Lawrence County. He went to Texas about thirty years ago, and at a recent date was still living in that state. About the same time came John M. Fullerton, also from Kentucky, and settled near Sarcoxie where he died about the year 1850. These settlers were undisturbed for a year or two, but other pioneers soon began to make their appearance and to occupy the beautiful and promising country. Ephraim Beasly, Hiram Hanford, Ephraim Jenkins, and Thomas Boxly all came in the Spring of 1833. Mr. Beasley settled on Centre Creek, four mileswest of Sarcoxie, on the place now owned by Stephen M. Hood. Jenkins made his home on the creek which now bears his name a mile or two from Dr. Moss. ís William and Tryon Gibson arrived a little later in the year 1833. Tryon settled on the present site of the High Hill School House five miles southwest of Carthage. Abraham Onstott, the father of Judge John Onstott arrived with his family from Indiana, and stopped where Sarcoxie is now on the 13th of November, 1833, a night made memorable by the falling of the stars. Onstott remained there two or three weeks and then settled five miles south of Carthage. He lived there till 1860, and then removed to Texas and died there. Judge Onstott, his son, is now in all probability the oldest male settler in the County, and has lived within its limits longer than any other man. In the fall of 1833 David Lemasters also came to the County, and made a location on Centre Creek, on the farm now occupied by Thomas Alexander, five miles southwest of Carthage(11).

Like his brother, Benjamin Evans Lemasters, David appears on the 1810 Census in the Louisiana and Missouri Territory in “Muster Roll of a Company of mounted Rangers under the command of Captain Nathan Boone”-rank: Private; appointment or enlistment: 18 Jun18 Jun 1812; to what time: 12 months to 18 Jun 1813…”(12)

About 1816, David married Ann Mackey (1793-bef. 1843) in the Missouri-Louisiana Territory. She was the daughter of James Mackey (1759-1834) and Rebecca Scott (1767-1818), and she came from North Carolina. They had a number of children. However, I have only been able to identify the name of one daughter. The 1830 Census for Pike County, Missouri indicates 1 m -5; 1 m 5-9; 1 m 10-14; 1 m 30-39(13). The same census indicates 1 f -5; 1 f 5-9; 1 f 10-14; 1 f 30-39. The 1840 Census for Marion, Newton County, Missouri indicates 2 m -5; 3 m 5-9; 1 m 10-14; 1 m 15-19; 1 m 20-29; 1 m 40-49. It also indicates 3 f -5; 1 f 10-14; 1 f 15-19; 1 f 20-29(14).  Ann Mackey died before 1843. It is possible the children all went to live with other relatives, with only one of them staying with their father. It is also possible that some of them died. The only known child appears below:

Jane Lemasters was born October 28, 1817 in St. Charles County, Missouri, and she died June 19, 1894 in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri. On July 23, 1835, she married John Wesley Gibson (1815-1869) in Jasper County, Missouri. Their children follow: (a) Wesley Gibson (1836-1863); (b) Benjamin F. Gibson (1838-1861); (c) Rebecca A. Gibson (1841-1874); (d) John Wesley Gibson (1843-1875); (e) Isaac N. Gibson (1847-1881); (f) Terry W. Gibson (1850-1871); (g) Eliza M. Gibson (1852-1856); (h) Mahala E. Gibson (1854-1916); (I) Mary A. Gibson (1856-1857); (j) Sarah Elizabeth Gibson (1858-1944). There is a Gibson Cemetery between Carthage and Webb City, Missouri where all of these people are buried.

According  to the Jasper County Biographical History:

Mrs. Jane Gibson.  It is half a century this fall, 1883, since Mrs. Gibson first landed within the borders of Jasper County, Mo., where she has lived almost uninterruptedly for fifty years.  She is, therefore, almost the first white settle who came to this county, and one of a very few who still survive.  Mrs. Gibson was born in St. Charles County, Mo., Oct. 28, 1817, where she was raised until quite a young woman.  Mrs. Gibson was married July 23, 1835, to John W. Gibson, who was born in Tennessee, Nov. 10, 1815.  Their children are Wesley, Benjamin F., John W., Isaac N., T. W., Rebecca A., Martha J., Eliza M., Mahala E., Mary A., and Sarah E.  Mr. John Gibson, her husband, died in December, 1869, and with several of the family is buried near the house he built in an early day, in 1835, in which his widow still resides.  Mrs. Gibson survives all her family but  three children, and is still smart and enjoys good health.  Mr. Joh Gibson entered nearly a section of land on the banks of Center Creek, and it is unexcelled for fertility and location.  The estate has been mostly divided up among the children and heirs.  Only a small homestead is reserved by the widow during her life.  Her father (David Lemasters) and father-in-law (Tryon or John T Gibson?) used to own slaves previous to the war, and they took them to Texas for protection.  Mrs. Gibson has experienced the hardships and privations of pioneer settlement.  She has planted corn in the sod and an ax, and the only bread the first season was made from corn pounded up into coarse meal.  Indians, wild game of all kinds, and distant neighbors were the rule, with Springfield and Boonville their trading points.  She has ridden to Sarcoxie horseback, about twenty-five miles, and paid fifty cents a yard for calico, and one dollar a yard for muslin for her wedding dress.  Incidents in her life might be given indefinitely, illustrating the joys as well as toils of her early history, were there space[sic].  Mrs. Gibson is conceded to be among the oldest living settlers of the county, and its history were incomplete without a sketch of her life.  She is a lady of great force of character, decided opinions, she dares to express, whose life is an open book, historic, yet ever new(15).

David Lemasters arrived in Jasper County in 1833, and he left there ten years later.  According to the County History, he was brought up on a charge of forgery in the early days of the court:

The first circuit court was held on the 25th of February, 1841, Judge Charles S. Yancey
presiding. J. P. Osborn acted as sheriff. It is related that that gentleman took a plug of tobacco

from his mouth, stepped to the door of the log shanty about twelve by sixteen feet in size, and
proclaimed to the world at large that the Jasper county circuit court was now in session. That
simple sentence, prefaced of course with the customary “Hear ye, Hear ye,” started the wheels of
the court, which have been running since except during the years of the war, when they became
slightly clogged.

The place of the holding of the first court was at the residence of George Hornback, only a short
distance below the Gaston farm, about two miles west of where the city of Carthage is now
situated. Mr. Hornback at that time kept a small store there, where could be purchased needful
articles, as salt, tobacco and powder. The grand jury, for want of better accommodations, after
receiving their charge from the judge, retired to a large log, and there held their deliberations.
Nothing of great importance was brought before their notice, and only one indictment was found-
-against David Lemasters for forgery, and this was set aside at the subsequent term of court (16).

Angeline Penelope Spence may have arrived  when her services were needed most. David had just been acquitted of the forgery charge in 1841. His wife had died before 1843. He was in desperate need of a nanny–of someone to help organize his household. That’s when Samuel, Daniel and Milly Catherine introduced Angeline to David Lemasters. She settled into his household as his nanny.

David and Angeline bonded quickly.  Prior to Angeline’s arrive, David began making plans to move away from Jasper County, where he had been for ten years. He planned to return to St. Charles, where family members were ready to accept his children into their households.  His daughter, Jane, would remain in Jasper County since she had married and was settled there. David decided there was one more person he wanted to take with him to St. Charles. On May 7, 1843, David Lemasters and Angeline Spence were married(17). [The return date on their certificate was May 11, 1843.] Shortly after that, they left Jasper County for David’s home in St. Charles, Missouri. As far as I can tell from existing records, they did not have any children.

On January 7, 1848, David died intestate in Green, St. Charles, Missouri(18). Angeline’s name appears on his probate file dated January 17, 1848(19). On July 26, 1850, James Green was appointed Administrator to sell his personal property(20). And Angeline had no desire to return to Jasper County.

On July 14, 1853, Angeline married a Lemasters’ family friend in St. Charles by the name of David G. Hutcherson (1797-1879)(21). David Hutcherson was born in Virginia in 1797, and he died in 1879 in Arkansas City, Arkansas. He had several wives and children by all of them except Angeline:

By Sarah Butler, whom he married in Mecklenburg County, Virginia on January 28, 1828:

  1. Peter F. Hutcherson, born 1830
  2. Mary J. Hutcherson, born 1832

By Mary P. Lett, whom he married in Mecklenburg County, Virginia on February 17, 1840:

  1. Caroline S. Hutcherson, born 1840
  2. Demetrius D. Hutcherson, born 1842
  3. Susan G. Hutcherson, born 1847

Angeline died before 1860 in St. Charles, Missouri. David Hutcherson moved to Texas after her death, where he is found on the 1860 Census for Denton(22), Texas. By 1870, he moved to Guadalupe, Texas, where he appears on the Census(23). Then he died in 1879 in Arkansas City, Arkansas.

To Be Continued in Part Two

 

References

(1) Notes from an old Notebook of Compiled Tennessee History. Original Source unknown. Possibly a Davidson County, Tennessee History

(2) Tennessee State Marriage Records about Elisha Spence and Jane Bell. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) 1820 Census for Elisha Spence, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) 1830 Census for Elisha Spence, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Elisha Spence Estate Inventory Filed by Anderson Skillern Nov 1835, Madison County, Tennessee. Copy of original obtained from Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee, 1998.

(6) Samuel P. Spence 1837 Land Deed for Sale of Land in Perry County, Tennessee. Copy obtained from Microfilm. LDS Genealogical Library and Archives. Salt Lake City, Utah.

(7) 1840 Census for Jane Spence, Marshall County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(8) MARION, RALLS, & PIKE COUNTIES MISSOURI,  Portrait and Biographical Record published 1895
Page 383

(9) “Notes for Benjamin Lemasters,” Swearingen, Lemasters, Francis, Winfrey Family History Book PDF file, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) 1860 Census for Nancy Harrison, Carroll County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) “The First Permanent Settlements,” Copied from: Greene County Archives Bulletin Number Forty-three;
Heritage County Atlas Reprints Volume 6. An Illustrated Historical Atlas Map of Jasper County, Mo.
Published by Brink, McDonough & Co., 1876. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) U.S. Census Reconstructed Records, 1660-1820 for 1810, David Lemasters, The Missouri-Louisiana Territory. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) 1830 Census for Pike County, Missouri, David Lemasters. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) 1840 Census for Marion, Newton County, Missouri, David Lemasters. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) Jane Lemasters Biography, Jasper County, Missouri Biographical History. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16)HISTORY OF JASPER COUNTY, MISSOURI 1876 Atlas Pages 2-3 Copied from: Greene County Archives, Bulletin Number Forty-three; Heritage County Atlas Reprints Volume 6, An Illustrated Historical Atlas Map of Jasper County, Mo. Published by Brink, McDonough & Co., 1876. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~judysstuff/jasper/jashist01.htm

(17) Missouri State Marriage Records, Jasper County, Missouri, for David Lemasters and Angeline P. Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(18) David Lemasters Probate File, St. Charles, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(19) David Lemasters Probate File, St. Charles, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(20) David Lemasters Probate File, St. Charles, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(21) Missouri State Marriage Records, St. Charles, Missouri, for David G. Hutcherson and Angeline Lemasters. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(22) 1860 Census for Denton, Texas, David G. Hutcherson. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(23) 1870 Census for Guadalupe, Texas, David G. Hutcherson. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com