Part Six: Off to Georgia–“Will the Real John Camp—?” [Lieut/Capt. John “Caswell” Camp (1743-1822)]

Colorado Rockies. Photo taken September 2016

Genealogical research can often be so perplexing. Sometimes it is difficult to see the forest through the trees! Such is the case with my husband’s fifth great grandfather, John Camp!  I began this search a year ago with the intention of starting with my father-in-law, Rev. Edward L. Beall (which I did). I was then planning to move through the generations leading up through John Camp. That’s when I encountered a HUGE mess  and sank down in the mud.

Colorado Moose in a stream. Photo taken September 2016.

Years ago, one of my husband’s aunts, Belle Beall, undertook this massive project. She and her husband George had no children, so she spent her spare moments in libraries and in state and national archives tracing out Howard’s father’s ancestry. She produced a wonderful manuscript of her endeavor. Howard became interested in the ancestry and using her manuscript as a guide, he embarked on a quest, retracing her steps. He was especially interested in finding his Revolutionary War ancestors. And that interest led him eventually to John Camp. But the question quickly became this: which John Camp?

Unfortunately with the advent of computers and increasing interest in the search for ancestral roots, the meticulous endeavor of accuracy has been lost. When I waded into John Camp’s information, I discovered a hodge-podge of gunk and was forced to start all over again. Howard’s quest for his ancestor became my quest as well. I wanted to straighten out the records. There were so many John Camps in Virginia and their information was all blended into one. In an effort to prove the identity of Howard’s ancestor, I first had to prove the John Camps who were not his ancestor first. Several trips to our local branch of the National Archives proved fruitful.  And I made some interesting discoveries

***

Captain John H. (Hamlin) Camp (1754-1820) of Gloucester County, Virginia.

Grave of Capt. John Camp of Gloucester County, Virginia from Find-a-Grave.com, Photo by Bobbie Camp Floyd, Memorial No. 9756441

 

This marker on John Camp of Gloucester’s grave is in error. He was in the Gloucester Militia. He stayed in Gloucester County during the War. And the Gloucester Militia was not part of the 1st Virginia State Regiment. I will explain that later.

  • Captain John H (Hamlin) Camp of Gloucester County, Virginia was not Howard’s ancestor. He was born in 1754 in Brunswick County, Virginia, and he died the 29th of April, 1820 in Elkton, Giles County, Tennessee. I do not know the identity of his parents and am beginning to believe that he had been orphaned and was raised possibly by another Camp family: John Camp (1719-1784) and his first wife, whose name has been suggested as Mary Madison. She was the mother of the elder John Camp’s children: William Camp, Sr. (b. 1742); John Camp (1743-1779); George Camp (1744-1779); Frances “Frankey” Camp-Hudson (1746-1846); and Lucy Camp (1748-1796). On February 11, 1782, John Camp married Mrs. Elizabeth Sims (1717-1785) in Greensville County, Virginia.(1). [Note: The reference here to Greensville County, Virginia connected me with John H. Hamlin Camp! He lived there at one time.]  The elder John Camp was the son of Thomas B. Camp II (1691-1751) and Mary Ivy/Ida Marshall (1697-1757), grandparents of Howard’s ancestor. And because of his middle name Hamlin, John H. Hamlin’s mother’s surname may have been Hamlin.
  • On September 13, 1775, John H. (Hamlin) Camp of Gloucester County was “Nominated Captain in the Gloucester County Militia by Committee of Safety.”(2)
  • On March 11, 1776, John H. (Hamlin) Camp of Gloucester County was listed as “John Camp for pay and expenses of his Co. on Duty in Gloster…23 14 5,”(3)
  • By 1779, John Camp of Gloucester County moved to Mecklenburg County Virginia, where he appears on the census records for 1779 through 1782. (4)(5)
  • In 1782, John of Gloucester married Elizabeth Wall (1760-1800) in Mecklenburg, County. Their children were: Dr. John Hamlin Camp (1783-1829); William Parrish Camp (1792-1875); James Wall or Wythe Camp (b. 1800).
  • By 1783, John of Gloucester had moved his family to Greensville County, Virginia, where they appear on the census. (6)
  • On November 24, 1791, John of Gloucester again engaged in military service, per the following: “Benj. Simmons, Capt., Edmund Lucas, Lieut & John Camp, Ensign, sev. took oaths of their resp. offices in Militia of this Co. & to suprt Constit.” (7)
  • Subsequently on August 23, 1793, “Lieut. John Camp took the oath of office (p.219).” (8)
  • And finally on October 24, 1799, “..John Camp is recommended as Capt. in room of Edmund Lucas who is rec. as Major & George Cain as Lieut. in room of John Camp.” (9)
  • On January 13, 1803, John Camp of Gloucester married Elizabeth Gilliam in Greensville County, Virginia. (10). And sometime between 1803 and 1808, John Camp of Gloucester and his family moved to Tennessee. The earliest land record I found for him is dated 1805 in Davidson County, Tennessee.(11)
  • On September 19, 1808, John Camp of Gloucester married Martha Ward Jones (1755-1823) in Davidson County, Tennessee (12), (13)
  • On December 19, 1812, John of Gloucester received a warrant for Tennessee land. (14)
  • John of Gloucester died April 29, 1820 in Elkton, Giles County, Tennessee, and he is buried in the Elkton Cemetery. (15)

***

Pvt. John Camp (1761-1832)

This document is often included on Howard’s ancestor’s records. It is for a John Camp who lived in Brunswick County, Virginia.

This section will focus on John Camp of Brunswick County, Virginia since his Revolutionary War Pension file often appears on Howard’s Ancestor’s records.

  • John Camp of Brunswick was born in Brunswick County, Virginia in 1761 and he died in Brunswick County, Virginia on November 25, 1832. I do not know anything about his parents, but I suspect that he is lodged somewhere in the huge Camp family of Virginia and that he is probably a distant cousin of Howard’s ancestor. According to a comment I placed on his Ancestry page: “Marriage Records of Brunswick County, Virginia 1730-1852 by Augusta B. Fothergill (no date), page 18: 26 Aug. 1793, Camp, John to Patsy Justys, George Johnson sec. Name sometimes shown as Kemp. Patsy and John Camp have not been found in an 1850 census.” (16)  If the records are correct, Patsy died in 1798. John may have remarried soon after her death, as discussed in the next two sections.
  • A number of people have called John Camp of Brunswick’s wife Martha Patsy Justice. There is a John E. Camp of Halifax County, Virginia, who married Martha Johnson April 5, 1826 in Halifax County, Virginia. (17) The records of the two John Camps are often combined. They were separate individuals. John Camp of Brunswick lived in Brunswick County all of his life. John E. Camp of Halifax appears to have remained in Halifax County. The only thing pertaining to John E. Camp of Halifax regarding the Revolutionary War is the rejection of his pension application pertaining to his lack of six months’ service. (18)
  • John Camp of Brunswick had two children: Peter G. Camp (b. 1799) and Polly Camp (b. 1805). He may have had a second marriage, and perhaps his wife’s first name was Martha.
  • John Camp of Brunswick appears on the 1810 Census for Mulherrin, Brunswick County, Virginia. (19)
  • In 1818, John Camp of Brunswick filed his application for a pension for service in the Revolutionary War. According to records in his file, he was a private in Col. Campbell’s Virginia Regiment, and he served for 18 months. He was wounded at Guilford Courthouse. Apparently, he was approved for a pension at first at first and was then denied. He was re-instated after his death in 1832. His wife and two children received back pay. According to his pension file, John died in Brunswick County, Virginia November 25, 1832.(20)

***

Captain John Camp (1752-1801) of Culpeper County, Virginia

 

Last Will and Testament of Capt. John Camp Will dated 1801

Second page of Capt. John Camp Will (1801)

Capt. John Camp was born in Culpeper County, Virginia in 1752, and he died in Culpeper County, Virginia in 1801. The probate date for his will is May 11, 1801. (21)  According to his ancestral chart, he is Howard’s 1st cousin 7 times removed, and Brian and Debbie’s 1st cousin 8 times removed. He was the son of  Ambrose Camp (1723-1769) and Ann Marshall (1739-1764)Howard’s 7th great aunt and uncle. Ambrose Camp was the son of Thomas B. Camp II (1691-1751) and Mary Ivy/Ida Marshall (1697-1757), referred to previously. They were Howard’s 7th great-grandparents.

The sad thing about Capt. John Camp is that his records have been confused with John H. (Hamlin) Camp of Gloucester County. My purpose here is to unsnarl the spaghetti. John H. (Hamlin) Camp was in the Gloucester County Militia during the Revolutionary War and was never in the Continental Army. Capt. John Camp of Culpeper County, Virginia was in the 3rd Virginia Regiment of the Continental Army, according to the following statement:

  • John Camp (1752-1801) served as lieutenant and captain (1776) in the 3rd Virginia Regiment. He was born and died in Culpeper VA. (22)

He was either injured or ill because he only appears of record in service for one year. And he was relatively young when he died (age 49). His Find-a-Grave entry does not indicate where he is buried. The location and/or cemetery are unknown.(23)

John had two marriages. The first wife’s name is unknown. Many people use the names of John Hamlin Camp’s wives, but that is not accurate. So I will list her as unknown here. The children of his first marriage follow:  Elizabeth Betsy Camp (1772-1798); James Camp (1773-1816); Robert Ambrose Camp (1774-1839); Ellen Camp (1776-1792).

In 1777, John married his second wife Sarah Pollard (1750-1798) in Culpeper County, Virginia. Their children were: Thomas Camp (b. 1786); William Marshall Camp (1788-1845); Sarah Sally Catherine Camp (1795-1830); Mildred Milly Ann Camp (1796-1875); John Camp (n.d.); Richard Camp (n.d.).  John’s children’s names are supplied in his will dated May 11, 1801. It was entered into probate June 15, 1801. (24)

 

* * *

 

Lieut/Capt. John “Caswell” Camp (1743-1821/22)

 

Lt. John Camp, Revolutionary War soldier
http://nathankempnetwork.happywebsite.biz/lumc-rwm.htm
Buried near Greenville, SC at Lebanon United Methodist Churchyard.
Whether the remains of Lt. John Camp are still buried here in the old cemetery or if they were removed to the Lebanon Churchyard a mile away, his commemorative marker stands at Lebanon near the D.A.R. monument erected by the Sullivan-Dunklin Chapter D.A.R.

Lieut/Capt. John “Caswell” Camp is my husband’s fifth great-grandfather. He was born October 13, 1743 in Orange County, Virginia, and he died between 1821-1822 in Jackson County, Georgia. I seriously doubt that his middle name was “Caswell.” I think that a number of researchers used this name to distinguish this John from the other “ten million John Camps” of record!

John Camp came from a huge family. His father Thomas Camp III was born in King and Queen County, Virginia on February 8, 1717, and he died January 8, 1798 in Island Ford, Rutherford County, North Carolina. Thomas had two marriages with twelve children from each marriage, or a total of twenty-four children. Thomas Camp’s Find-a-Grave entry lists the family as follows:

Thomas Camp- Margret Carney – new headstone
10/17/2011
BL Allison
BL Allison originally shared this on 25 Sep 2012 Ancestry.com. Provo, Utah.  Stone located in Family Cemetery, Island Ford, Rutherford County, North Carolina

Marriage No. 1: Winifred Starling ((1720-1761)–August 1737, Accomack, Virginia

  • Edmund K. Camp (1738-1834)
  • Rev. Joseph Wilson Camp (1741-1820)
  • John Camp–the subject here
  • Nathaniel Camp (1745-1800)1763-
  • Thomas Camp IV (1747-1811)
  • Starling Camp (1749-1851)
  • Hosea Camp (1751-1857)
  • William Camp (1753-1827)
  • Alfred Camp (1755-1772)
  • Benjamin Alston Camp, Sr. (1757-1832)
  • Elizabeth Camp (1759-1850)
  • Joel Camp (1761-1762)

Marriage No. 2: Margaret Carney (1744-1824)–1762, poss. Brunswick, Virginia

  • Crenshaw Camp (1763-1808)
  • James Camp (1765-1817)
  • Daniel Camp (1766-1798)
  • Lewis Camp (1768-1836)
  • Adam Camp (1769-1769)
  • Stephen Camp (1771-1846)
  • Larkin Camp (1773-1773)
  • Eunice Camp (1775-1820)
  • Aaron Camp (1778-1861)
  • Ruth Camp (1780-1852)
  • George Camp (1782-1835)
  • Joshua Camp (1786-1849) (25)

According to a Wikipedia article, Orange County was created in August 1734 when Spotsylvania was divided. (26) Culpeper County was later established from Orange County, Virginia in 1749. (27) The Thomas Camp family had settled in Orange County, where several of their children were born, including John Camp. The section where they were living became Culpeper County, and the Camp family resided there until the Spring of 1776 when the Revolutionary War was underway. Thomas Camp’s first wife, Winifred Starling, died in Culpeper County in 1761.(28) Thomas married his second wife Margaret Carney (1744-1844) about 1762. And then came the Revolutionary War.

 

The Early Days

On January 30, 1764, John Camp married a cousin by the name of  Mary Minnie Tarpley (1740-1820/1822).(29) Mary was born October 30, 1740 in North Farnham Parish, Richmond County, Colony of Virginia, and she was the daughter of James Tarpley (1692-1765) and Mary Camp (1708-1758).  According to a note on my tree:

  • John Camp married Mary Tarpley of Williamsburg, VA, sister of Rev. John Tarpley, founder of Methodism in VA. and a descendent of Wm. Tarpley of Bruton parish. (30), (31)

Mary Camp’s parents were Thomas Camp the Immigrant (1661-1711) and Catherine Barron (1672-1715). And her brother was Thomas B. Camp II (1691-1751)her husband John Camp’s grandfather.

The children of John and Mary Tarpley Camp have been identified in John’s will:

  • Annie Naomi “Anneiniomy” Camp (1762-1853)Annie and her husband John Hill (1760-1831) will be the focus of another article. They are Howard’s ancestors.
  • Winifred Camp (1764-1832). She married Thomas Kinsman (1760-1783). Their daughter was Elizabeth Mahon Kinsman (b. 1780).
  • Thomas “Scary Tom” Camp (1765-1823). His wife was Susanna D. Wagoner (1755-1820). Their children were Elizabeth Camp (b. 1781), Patience Drucilla Camp (1792-1883); Nancy Camp (1798-1840).
  • James Camp (1733-1833). His wife was Mary Ragsdale Berry (1757-1812). Their children were: John “Big Head” Camp (1785-1877); Sarah Camp (1785-1832); Robert Berry Camp (1787-1863); James Camp (1789); Merritt Camp (1789?); Talbort Camp (1789?); Joseph Camp (1791-1847); Eli Camp (b. 1793); Starling Camp (1793-1830); Mary Camp (b. 1805).
  • Starling Camp (1771-1851). Starling married Anna Elizabeth Helm (1772-1857). Their children were: Sarah Camp (1804-1881); William Camp (1808-1866).
  • Abner Mason Camp (1775-1853). His wife was Elizabeth Ragsdale (1776-1854). Their children were: Edmund Napolean Camp (1799-1827); Arthur Tarpley Camp (1800-1868); Satira Camp (1805-1892); Hiram Camp (1806-1874); Mary Camp (1811-1900); Martha Camp (1814-1906)
  • Kezziah Camp (1777-1835). She married Benjamin Arnold (1769-1840). Their children were: Ann Nancy Arnold Hendrick (1797-1879); Sarah Arnold Moore (1799-1868); Temperance Arnold Hamilton (1801-1857); Winifred Arnold Washington (1802-1868); Alston Arnold (1804-1887); Malinda Arnold (1805-1830); Claramond Arnold (b. 1807).

The son of John Camp and his second wife Mary:

  • John Camp, Jr. (1791-1840). John Camp, Jr. is the “mystery man.” John Sr. crossed out “to my son John’s children” in his will, and John, Jr’s  name constantly appears in printed materials with no dates. People have added John Camp, Jr. to their trees with a host of wives, including his mother. For a long time, I left him off the list. However, I’ve recently changed my mind. I believe there was a John Camp, Jr. and he was the son of John Camp Sr. and his second wife, Mary (surname unknown).  John Sr. and Jr. may have eventually parted company over various issues. John Sr. may have disinherited him as well. John Jr. may have been the “prodigal son” in the family. A son John Jr.’s age appears in John Sr.’s household on the 1800 Census for Greenville, South Carolina.(32) I found a John Jr. on Georgia records living in the same area as John Sr.
  • John Camp, Jr. was born in South Carolina in 1791 (33). John Jr. appears on the Georgia Tax Digest for 1809 in Jackson County, Georgia on the same list with John Camp, Sr.(34)  He also appears on the 1820 Census in Walton County, Georgia, where he had evidently moved and settled.(35), On October 16, 1822, he was admitted to the Georgia Prison System on a conviction of manslaughter  in Walton County, Georgia, and he was sentenced to a prison term of five years.(36) He may be the John Camp who appears on the 1830 Census for Carroll County, Georgia (37), and the John Camp who appears on the 1840 Census for Henry County, Georgia (38) His wife was approximately his age. According to the 1840 Census he had three sons born in 1810, 1820, and 1821/1822 and two daughters born abt 1820 and 1826. That would certainly account for his prison term. His prison record describes him as being 5 ft. 6 in. tall, sandy hair, of dark complexion and blue eyes.

***

Between 1764 and 1768, the John Camp, Sr. and his wife, Mary Tarpley moved to Orange County, North Carolina, where their first four children were born: Annie, Winifred, Thomas and James. By 1770 the John Camp family relocated to 96 District in South Carolina, where their daughter Sallie was born. And by 1771, the family relocated to Rutherford County, North Carolina where Starling, William and Abner were born.

In September 1775, John Camp reportedly left his family in Rutherford County and journeyed to South Carolina where he joined the Spartan Regiment of Militia under the Command of Col. John Thomas, Sr, and where he served for approximately three months. If so, He would have participated in 96 District November 19, 1775, Great Cane Break December 22, 1775, and the Snow Campaign December 23-30, 1775.(38)  It may have been during this period of time when he met the Roebucks of Virginia–a group he would encounter later during the war. After the 1775 campaigns, he returned to his family in North Carolina.

 

The Culpeper Minute Men of Culpeper County Virginia and the 1st Virginia State Regiment at Valley Forge

Symbol of the Culpeper County Minute Men, Culpeper County, Virginia

By January 1776, John was back in Culpeper County, Virginia where his father still lived, although he was planning to move to North Carolina. His wife and children either remained in North Carolina with monthly visits from John, or they went with him.  I believe in the first version because it would have been difficult traveling with a family of young children at that time.  John wasn’t in Culpeper County, Virginia long before becoming a lieutenant under Capt. Gabriel Jones in the Culpeper Minutemen.  On March 1, 1776, John Camp was paid for five rifles purchased for arming the public, and his father Thomas was paid for wagon hire for the public.(39)

Several records are important here and I cite them from my tree:

  • John Camp served as Lieut under Capt Gabriel Jones/Col Geo Gibson, who led 1st co. of Minute Men from Culpeper Co. Took over as Capt after Capt.Jones died of wounds. One item I recall reading said that a young lieutenant by the name of John Camp called frequently on Capt. Gabriel Jones. (40) The following is a brief account of Capt. Gabriel Jones:
    • Gabriel II was a Revolutionary officer, first as a Captain of the Marines with a ship at Fredericksburg (Stewart – “History of Virginia’s Navy of the Revolution” – p. 209), and later as a commander of one of the companies of the Culpeper Minute Men. (Burgess – “Virginia Soldiers of 1776” – p. 1244). The latter book records that Captain Gabriel Jones received 4,000 acres bounty. (Land located in Kentucky.) Additional bounty for one year, three months, three days service was given May 6, 1840 to his daughter, Mary Jones Wigginton. (Military Warrants from the Virginia State Library, Archives Division – Numbers 2920 and 8793.) Captain Gabriel Jones led out one of the first companies of the Culpeper Minute Men (“St. Mark’s Parish”, p. 19) who were organized after Patrick Henry, then commander of the Virginia troops, sent for assistance. The first companies included 150 men from Culpeper, 100 from Orange, and 100 from Fauquier. Laurence Taliaferro of Orange was colonel; Edward Stevens of Culpeper, lieutenant colonel; and Thomas Marshall of Fauquier, (father of the Chief Justice), Major. The flag used by the corps bore in its center a rattlesnake coiled, above which was inscribed “The Culpeper Minute Men”; on either side, “Liberty or Death”, and beneath, “Don’t Tread on Me”. The troops were dressed in green hunting shirts; buck tails hung from their old hats; and from their belts swung tomahawks and scalping knives. In the course of the war eight companies of eighty-four men each were raised in the county. Evidently Captain Gabriel Jones became ill or was possibly wounded, for he died after February 4 and before March 1, 1777, a young man, probably in his late 30’s. (Council Journal 1776-77, pp. 318 and 367). In writing of his death Robert Pollard states that Captain Jones’ health became infirm in service, and after languishing for sometime, he departed this life. He says further that as a neighbor he visited the Captain often during his illness, and that since he was confined to his bed, he wrote letters for the officer. Pollard was also intimately acquainted with the First Lieutenant, afterwards Captain John Camp, who made frequent calls on Captain Jones during his illness for orders relative to the Company. (Letter from Robert Pollard – Virginia State Library – Archives Division – Bounty Warrant 1838.) Gabriel Jones was buried in a Slaughter family graveyard at “Milton”, situated on the road from La Grange to Brandy Station. After the Slaughters, “Milton” was owned for many years by the Fitzhugh family, and when Judge John W. Jones visited it in 1893, searching for some trace of the Captain’s grave, only the Fitzhugh section of the cemetery was enclosed, all Slaughter graves being indistinguishable. (41)

  • John Camp served as Lieut under Capt Gabriel Jones/Col Geo Gibson, who led 1st co. of Minute Men from Culpeper Co. Took over as Capt after Capt.Jones died of wounds. (42)
  • The Culpeper Minutemen were organized on July 17, 1775 in the district created by the Third Virginia Convention consisting of the counties of Orange, Fauquier and Culpeper. Recruitment began in September 1775 with four companies of 50 men from Fauquier and Culpeper counties each and two companies of 50 men from Orange county.[1] The District Committee of Safety determined that the militia was to meet under a large oak tree in “Clayton’s old field” on the Catalpa estate near today’s Yowell Meadow Park in Culpeper, Virginia.(43)
  • John Camp served w/the Culpeper Minutemen in 1776. That unit was placed into Continental Service as the 1st Virginia State Regiment under Col. Geo. Gibson, replacing the destroyed 9th VA. The 1st VA State Regt. went to Valley Forge.(44)
  • The 1st Virginia State Regiment was a regiment of Virginia Militia that fought during the American Revolutionary War. The regiment was authorized by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia in December 1776 as a force of regular troops for the Commonwealth’s defense. In 1777, Virginia had difficulty meeting its quota for the regular line of the Continental Army. As a result, in July 1777 under the command of Colonel George Gibson, the regiment began a march North to temporarily join the Continental Army in the Philadelphia Campaign.[1][2] In January 1778, the Virginia General Assembly passed an act directing that the 1st Virginia State Regiment “now in Continental service, be continued in said service instead of the Ninth Virginia Regiment, made prisoners by the enemy in the Battle of Germantown.” The regiment camped at Valley Forge in the winter of 1777-78 and at Middlebrook in the winter of 1778-79 and participated in the Battle of Monmouth. The regiment remained in the service of the Continental Army until late 1779 when redeployed Virginia.[5][3] Unlike the standard division of eight found in the regular line regiments of the Continental Army, the 1st Virginia State Regiment consisted of ten companies including one of light infantry.(45)
  • 1st VA State Regiment arrived October 12, 1777 at Valley Forge, Chester, Pennsylvania, USA. John Camp was appointed Captain in the 5th Division.  John’s term of service ended April 8, 1778, according to a pay receipt. John returned to Virginia a number of times during his stay at Valley Forge to recruit troops. He did see his family on those occasions.  He received his final pay for the month of April in May.(46) (47)

Referring to my comment earlier in this article about the placement of the 1st Virginia State Regiment marker on John H (Hamlin) Camp of Glocester County’s grave: John H. (Hamlin) Camp of Glocester County was in the Glocester Militia in the Revolutionary War. That unit was militia only. John “Caswell” Camp was in the Culpeper Minutemen which evolved into the 1st Virginia State Regiment. They began as militia and were transferred into continental service at Valley Forge.

 

Off to the Carolinas

 

King’s Mountain Memorial, New Lebanon Methodist Churchyard, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Photo from Find-a-Grave. Marker includes Lt. John Camp.  Maintained by: Irememberu
Originally Created by: Robin Farley Dixson
Record added: Jan 16, 2004
Find A Grave Memorial# 8285233 https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=8285233

 

During the War, John Camp’s family moved to South Carolina, where daughter Kezziah was born. The family may have then moved to Caswell County, North Carolina, where John Camp appears on a list of taxpayers in Gloverston District. (48) The Old First Register No. 360 (granted April 1) shows “John Camp claiming 150 acres of land on the north side of Broad River joining and below Richard Henderson’s land including his own improvement. Also joining land of Mr. Hill, Dec. 4, 1778.” (49) On December 14, 1779, John acquired a land grant in Tryon County, North Carolina: “200 acres on both sides of Second Broad River.”(50)

By 1779, John had moved his family to 96 District, South Carolina, where he became active once again in militia activities. He joined Captain George Roebuck‘s company of Colonel Benjamin Roebuck‘s battalion of the Spartan Militia., where he entered as a private and was promoted to lieutenant. (51) And in September 1780, “John, Nathan, and Thomas Camp (probably John’s brother), another Thomas Camp, a Benjamin Camp and an Edmund Camp participated  in the Battle of Kings Mountain. John served in Roebuck’s Battalion of Spartan Regiment.(52) An account of the Battle of Kings Mountain follows:

      • ” Thomas Camp, my great-grandfather and father of the above twenty-four (24) children, died in 1798. He first lived in the upper part of Virginia. Then moved to Halifax Co. in same state. Then to where Durham, N. C., now is and just before the revolutionary war moved to Rutherford County, N. C., and settled in Ireland (Island) Ford, on the French Broad River. He was a millwright by profession and built and owned the first mill erected in that section, he and his wife were staunch rebels, patriots, and aided the revolutionary, for which they were robbed and pillaged by the British army….”
             [Mrs. Sara Sullivan Ervin, Camp-Kemp Family Hist., Vol. II, p. 10]
  • Some of these individuals fought in the battles of Kings Mountain in September of 1780 and in the cattle-grazing area known as Cowpens in October 1780. The battle Kings Mountain saw the defeat of the left wing of Cornwallis’ army and the loyalist win of the Cowpens enraged Cornwallis even further. This battle is the battle shown in the recent Mel Gibson’s film, “The Patriot”. Thomas Camp Jr. enlisted for the cause and probably fought at the battle of Kings Mountain. Lt. John Camp may have been here at King’s Mountain under Colonel Roebuck. Reverend Joseph Camp was arrested as a spy by General Cornwallis. Nathaniel Camp was also at King’s Mountain and perhaps killed the British General Ferguson. Nathaniel’s son had Ferguson’s conch shell battle horn which later became part of the collection of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Thomas Sr. was probably too old but did provide supplies to the revolution and was said to have had his mill and house at Island Ford on the Broad River taken over by the British and burned. Thomas’ brothers were also supporters of the revolution. Wm. C. Camp wrote much later, “many of the early settlers of the up-country were of English extraction and dissenters of the Established Church of the mother country.”(53)
  • There is a story about 50 British soldiers on their way to King’s Mountain who happened to cross the Camp property in North Carolina. The Camps killed them and buried the bodies. That cemetery is still maintained today. According to Carol Frazier:
    • The Thomas Camp home place is in Tryon Co, NC  called White Oak Plantation.  11,000 acres of Land was granted to Thomas by king of England.  It is still there.  The desc. sold to a developer a few years ago, and they have made a golf and upscale development.  They are from Ireland and have retained the orginal plantation.  There is a “red coat” cemetery on the ground which has been preserved.  On their way to Kings Mt, the red coats passed thru the camp farm, the Camps caught and killed @ 50 and buried them on the spot.  Very interesting.  Lots of history there. (54)
  • It is often reported that John Camp was a member of Sullivan’s Scouts during the Revolution. The organization did not exist. For more information, see Deason Smith.  SULLIVAN’S COMPANY ROSTER AND THE PROBLEM OF ENTRENCHED DISINFORMATION, 1/28/05; http://www.next1000.com/family/EC/sc.soldiers.html (55)

Then came the charge of treason

 

The Treason Charge

It absolutely confounds me that a charge of treason against John Camp and a large number of his family members still holds true. And despite the fact that many of the DAR markers acknowledging the patriotic efforts of John Camp and the other members of his family, the Daughters of the American Revolution will not accept descendants of the Camps for membership into their society.

I remember following a discussion of this problem on a Camp discussion board over a year ago. One person commented that the reason for DAR’s rejection stemmed from the fact that so many Camp descendants were joining DAR that the organization stopped accepting members from that line. Then the treason charge arose, and that is the argument the DAR endorsed: prove these people were exonerated by providing copies of actual court documents concerning their exhoneration and the ban against membership will be lifted.(56)

It is sad but true that there was a charge of treason lodged against the Camps per the following:

  • 1783-COURT-CONFLICT: Hedy Hughes Newton, RUTHERFORD Co NC ABSTRACTS OF MINUTES, COURT OF PLEAS AND QUARTER SESSIONS; 1779-1786;; pp 45,46; DAR Library, Washington DC. NOTE: Photocopy in files of L. C. Preston, Ref. B05.08:1783. CONFLICT: “Whereas, Summonses having issued to the Sheriff to notify the following persons to appear and answer an Inquisition of treason, felony and fortiture found against them by the Grand Jury. To witt: … Grandshaw Camp … John Camp, John Camp Junr. … James Camp … And now being Solemnly called Show cause why their property should not be Confiscated, failed to appear to Show any Cause. It is therefore considered by the Court that their property be ADJUDGED forfited.” COMMENT: All indications are that this is an erroneous record for John Camp (1743-1818), as he was in South Carolina fighting for the American cause. No property was confiscated from him. NC Grant #253 which was “seized,” remained in his possession and was sold by him in 1810. See elsewhere in his records preceding and following. Photocopy in files of L. C. Preston, Ref. B05.08:1783. (57)

Naturally, this topic made an interesting read on the Camp discussion board I was following last year. There is no evidence any of these Camps were convicted. As noted above, John Camp sold the property that was supposedly confiscated along with other properties in Rutherford County. And the Camps did not appear in court as they were ordered to do. Why would they when the members of the grand jury were probably a group of Tories!

Families were as bitterly divided in the South during the Revolutionary War as they were a century later during the Civil War. I remember someone on the discussion board saying that he or she went to Rutherford County to check out the records. The pages pertaining to the conclusion of the treason charge had been mysteriously removed from the record books. The researcher thought the original complaint against these Camps and others came from local Tories, some of them possibly family members who supported the British. Thomas Camp, Sr. had five sons who fought at King’s Mountain: 3 on the side of the patriots and 2 on the side of the British. Culprits making the charge against these Camps and others were probably responsible for removing the pages. If that’s what happened, then the block against the Camps by the DAR for membership in the organization will never be removed. The pages were undoubtedly destroyed, and there is no longer any record.

Court Battles in Spartanburg, South Carolina

One thing can be said about the Camp family: they liked to fight! From 1784 to 1799, John Camp was involved in protracted law suits in Spartanburg, South Carolina. One of the main contenders was a man by the name of John Chism. I don’t know anything about this John Chism. However, he appears to have come from Virginia, and he may have served with Roebuck in the Revolutionary War. If so, then I believe some of this contention could date back to that period of time. Both John Camp and John Chism served in Roebuck’s unit. I won’t go into all the individual suits. A number of them involved actions of trespass.(58)

 

A Second Marriage

Lebanon pre-1832 graveyard
The old 1832 cemetery markers near Princeton, SC. It was in Greenville County when it was created. Today, it is in Laurens County. One of the markers is of John Camp.
aprilreed1 originally shared this to Ancestry.com on 13 May 2010

 

Mary Tarpley Camp passed away in Greenville County, South Carolina in 1789. In all likelihood, she is buried in the New Lebanon Graveyard, although there is no marker on her grave. She may be buried in the vicinity of her husband’s marker.

In 1789 or 1790, John married a second time, and his second wife’s name was also Mary. I do not know her surname, and I have not discovered a marriage record for them. They had one son by the name of John Camp, Jr., who was born in 1791. I have discussed him previously. I have thought that some of John’s civil battles may have stemmed from his choice of a second wife. And it is possible that they had a common law marriage.

On June 3, 1795, John Camp of Greenville County, South Carolina sold to Daniel Miles of Rutherford County, N. C. for 35 lb 150 acres in Rutherford Co., N.C. on Second Broad River. Witnesses: James Camp, Thomas Camp,) etc. (59). Then in 1798, “John Camp applied for a plat for 276 acres on a branch of Peachline Creek, Laurens County, Ninety Six District, Surveyed by Benjamin Arnold.” (60) And sometime between 1800 and 1801, John Camp, his wife Mary, their son, John and other family members left South Carolina for Georgia and first settled in a place called Snoden.

 

Off to Georgia

 

Originally the Creek Indian Village of Snodon, it later became Jug Tavern. Today it is Winder. Three counties intersected at Jug Tavern: Jackson, Walton and Gwinnett

Originally the site of a Creek Native American village called Snodon, the town of Snodon came into existence in 1795 when the first white settlers settled there.  That same year, the town became known as Jug Tavern. According to the Winder history website:

  • Winder has a long and rich history. It was a place for early settlement, being first occupied hundreds of years ago by Creek Indians, who called it Snodon. Activities centered around what are now Athens and Church streets. When white settlers established homes and farms near that village in 1793, the town was renamed, becoming The Jug, and, ten years later; Jug Tavern. At that time, the town had a population of 37 persons. The first school was built on 11.5 acres, known as the Academy Lot, located at the intersection of West Athens and Church streets. An historic marker now commemorates the site. For protection from hostile Indians, Fort Yargo was constructed, one of four such forts built in the area by the Humphrey brothers.
  • Jug Tavern grew slowly during the decades before the Civil War. The town, at the time of its origin, extended from the railroad crossing of Broad Street (then known as Jefferson Road) for one-half mile into three counties: Jackson, Walton and Gwinnett. In 1884, Jug Tavern was incorporated by the Georgia General Assembly. It was first governed by a mayor and four aldermen who were elected annually. The first mayor, N. J. Kelly, took the oath of office on January 8, 1885.(61)

Barrow County was eventually created from the three-county uncertainty over jurisdiction, especially in disputes:

  • Two local men became involved in a fight. One of the men, standing in Gwinnett County, shot another man who was standing in Jackson County. The unhappy victim of this affair fell and died in Walton County (Ingram, p. 16). (62)

The first record for John Camp in Jackson County, Georgia is dated December 3, 1801 in which John Camp sold to Joseph Camp, both of Jackson County “100 acres for 100 dollars” (63) He also appears on the 1809 George Tax Records with his son, Abner and his son John Jr. in Jackson County, Georgia. (64) And in 1810, he sold the supposedly confiscated property #253 located in Rutherford County, North Carolina. (65)

 

 

John Camp’s Will

Camp.John.Will.part1
4/3/2008 9:24:20 AM
Originally found on internet, part 1 and 2 http://www.next1000.com/family/EC/camp.john.html Family mentioned in will: wife Mary son Abner Camp son Thos Camp son William Camp daughter Salley Gradon daughter Anniomey Hill daughter Winey Kinmon son James Camp son Starling Camp daughter Kizah Arnold
Mary Nelson
Mary Nelson originally shared this on 15 jul 2015

Camp.John.Will.part2
4/3/2008 9:22:41 AM
Mary Nelson
Mary Nelson originally shared this on 31 Aug 2014
[Note: He crossed out “and to the children of John Camp”]

For years, people claimed that John Camp died in 1813. He lived much longer than that and probably died in 1821 or 1822.  His will was discovered in a suitcase of family papers. It was not signed. The date is difficult to read.  And the will is not recorded. A transcription of that will follows:

John Camp Georgia will
drleeshort
drleeshort originally shared this to Ancestry.com on 01 Mar 2016

The date of the will is difficult to read, but it appears to be December 29, 1819. It is not signed. It is not witnessed. And it is not recorded. I get the sense that John wasn’t too happy with some of his children: they “have all I ever planned to give them” and “I will not give them one more thing.” He was going to leave something to the children of his son by his second marriage–John Jr.–but the original copy shows that part crossed out. Those children are not named.

John didn’t die December 29, 1819. That is the date of his will. John Camp and his second wife appear alive and well on the 1820 Census for Gwinnett County, Georgia:

John Camp and wife Mary on the 1820 Census for Gwinnett County, Georgia. Abner Camp, named Executor of John’s estate in the will, is on the same census roster.

His son, Abner, appears on the same page in a separate household.

John Camp probably died between 1821 and 1822 in Jackson/Walton/Gwinnett County, Georgia. The following indicates the location of his burial.

  • From: TrlHkr@aol.com
    To: CAMP-L@rootsweb.com
    Date: Friday, November 06, 1998 10:47 PM
    Subject: Re: John Camp’s Burial SiteIt is generally stated that John Camp was buried in the Old Grove Cemetery, near the present Lebanon Methodist Church . One has to wonder why someone would take that long trip by wagon (from Jackson Co., GA) just to bury John there. Although, maybe his wife was buried there. John did not linger long in that area, and likely had no particular attachment to it. John Camp’s grandson, Rev. Joseph Camp, dictated a note to his daughter, Laura Camp Bailey, between 1895 and 1900, a typed transcript of which I have seen, in which he states his grandfather “is buried 1 1/2 miles from Jug Tavern on his own place. His grave is covered with Chris—(?) 100 yards from the road”. Jug Tavern is the site of Winder, and Jackson Co. , GA. This grave site is also listed in a book on the grave sites of Revolutionary veterans, which interestingly lists a John Camp at each of the above sites. So take you pick as to burial site. As for me, I think it is more likely near Winder. (66)

And I agree!

***

I’m glad I jumped to the end of this series. This article was a challenge to write. The research has taken a year. And it took me a week to write it!

 

References

(1) Virginia, Compiled Marriages, 1660-1800. Dodd, Jordan. Publisher:Ancestry.com Operations Inc. Publisher Date:1997. Publisher Location, Provo, UT, USA.

(2) Virginia Soldiers of 1776, pp. 562-563, Online Database, Ancestry.com. http://http://interactive.ancestryinstitution.com/48645/VASoldiers1776-000824-562

(3) Virginia State Troops in the Revolution p.599. VA Military Records database: http://interactive.ancestryinstitution.com/48440VAMilitaryRecords-006442-600

(4) Virginia Census, 1607-1890. Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.PublisherOnline publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.Original data – Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.Orig

(5) Virginia Census, 1607-1890. Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.PublisherOnline publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.Original data – Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.Orig

(6) Virginia Census, 1607-1890 Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.PublisherOnline publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.Original data – Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.Orig

(7) VA Military Records Database: http://interactive.ancestryinstitution.com/48440/VAMilitaryRecords-006012-170

(8) Virginia Military Records (database on-line: http://interactive.ancestryinstitution.com/48440/VAMilitaryRecords-006013-171

(9) Virginia Military Records online: http://interactive.ancestryinstitution.com/48440/VAMilitaryRecords-008016-174

(10) Virginia, Marriage Records, 1700-1850. Ancestry.com. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2012. Publisher Location :Provo, UT, USA

(11) Tennessee, Early Tax List Records, 1783-1895. Ancestry.com. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2013. Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(12) Tennessee Marriages to 1825. Dodd, Jordan. Publisher Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1997.Original data – Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Tennessee. Original data: Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individ

(13) Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Ancestry.com. Publisher: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2008.Original data – Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Nashville, TN, USA: Tennessee State Library and Archives. Microfilm. Original data: Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Nashville, TN, USA

(14) Tennessee State Library and Archives; Nashville, Tennessee; Early Tennessee/North Carolina Land Records; Series Number: 10; Series Title: Warrant. Source Information: Tennessee, Early Land Registers, 1778-1927 Ancestry.com. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2016. Lehi, UT, USA

(15) U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current. Record  Source Information. U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current. Ancestry.com. Note Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.. Publisher Date 2012. Publisher Location. Provo, UT, USA

(16) Fothergill, Augusta B. Marriage Records of Brunswick County, Virginia 1730-1852  (no date), page 18.

(17) Virginia Marriages, 1740-1850. Ancestry.com. Publisher: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.Original data – Dodd, Jordan R., et al.. Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850. Bountiful, UT, USA: Precision Indexing Publishers. Original data: Dodd, Jordan R., et al.. Early Amer.

(18) Ancestry.com. American Revolutionary War Rejected Pensions [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2000. Original Data: Rejected or Suspended Applications for Revolutionary War Pensions. Washington, D.C.: n.p., 1852.

(19) Year: 1810; Census Place: Meherrin, Brunswick, Virginia; Roll: 66; Page: 745; Image: 00738; Family History Library Film: 0181426Source Information:1810 United States Federal Census. Ancestry.com. Publisher: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data – Third Census of the United States, 1810. (NARA microfilm publication M252, 71 rolls). Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington. DC.

(20) Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900AuthorAncestry.comPublisherOnline publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.Original data – Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files (NARA microfilm publication M804, 2,670 rolls). Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Records of the National Archives, Washington D.C.

(21) Virginia, Wills and Probate Records, 1652-1983 Record. Source Information: Virginia, Wills and Probate Records, 1652-1983. Ancestry.com. Virginia County, District, and Probate Courts. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2015. Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(22) Book Title: Lineage Book : NSDAR : Volume 095 : 1912Source Information: North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000. Ancestry.com. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.:2016. Provo, UT, USA

(23) U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current. Ancestry.com. Note: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi. Publisher: Ancestry.com. Operations, Inc. Publisher Date:2012, Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(24) Last Will and Testament of John Camp. Virginia, Wills and Probate Records, 1652-1983. Ancestry.com. Virginia County, District, and Probate Courts. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2015. Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(25)U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current. Author: Ancestry.com. Note: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi. Publisher:Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date:2012. Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(26) Orange County, Virginia. Wikipedia.com. This page was last edited on 18 January 2018, at 00:55. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

(27) Culpeper County, Virginia. Wikipedia.com. This page was last edited on 7 December 2017, at 19:31. Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

(28) International, Find A Grave Index for Select Locations, 1300s. Current Author: Ancestry.com. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2012. Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(29) Book Title: Lineage Book : NSDAR : Volume 139 : 1918Source Information: Title: North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000. Author: Ancestry.com. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2016. Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(30) Source number: 2419.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: SDWTitle: U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900. Author: Yates Publishing. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations Inc. Publisher Date: 2004.  Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(31) Year: 1800; Census Place: Greenville, South Carolina; Series: M32; Roll: 47; Page: 273; Image: 530; Family History Library Film: 181422Source Information: 1800 United States Federal Census. Author: Ancestry.com. Publisher: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data – Second Census of the United States, 1800. (NARA microfilm publication M32, 52 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Grou

(32) Georgia, Central Register of Convicts, 1817-1976. Author: Ancestry.com, Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2014, Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(33) Georgia, Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892. Author: Ancestry.com. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2011. Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(34) 1820 U S Census; Census Place: Walton, Georgia; Page: 222; NARA Roll: M33_10; Image: 120Title:1820 United States Federal Census. Author: Ancestry.com. Publisher: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data – Fourth Census of the United States, 1820. (NARA microfilm publication M33, 142 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record G

(35) Georgia, Central Register of Convicts, 1817-1976. Author: Ancestry.com, Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date: 2014, Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(36) 1830; Census Place: Carroll, Georgia; Series: M19; Roll: 16; Page: 215; Family History Library Film: 0007036Source Information: Title: 1830 United States Federal Census. Author: Ancestry.com. Publisher: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data – Fifth Census of the United States, 1830. (NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Gr

(37) Year: 1840; Census Place: District 525, Henry, Georgia; Roll: 43; Page: 350; Family History Library Film: 0007044. Source Information: :Title 1840 United States Federal Census. Author: Ancestry.com. Publisher: Online publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch. Original data – Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. (NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census

(38) The American Revolution in South Carolina: The Spartan Regiment of Militia. Note: Online source: http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriot_militia_sc_spartan_regiment.html. Publisher© 2007 – J.D. Lewis – PO Box 1188 – Little River, SC 29566 – All Rights Reserved

(39) Virginia Military Records. Ancestry.com.  This entry was originally written by Johni Cerny and Gareth L. Mark for Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources. This page was last edited on 19 November 2012, at 15:35.© 1984-2010 by Ancestry.com or as of date of publication by contributing authors. Copy obtained at the National Archives and Records Room, Westminster, Colorado, January 2016.

(40) VA Soldiers of 1776, p 521. http://interactive.ancestryinstitution.com/48645/VASoldiers1776-000783-5

(41) Captain Gabriel Jones, Jr. from THE DESCENDANTS OF GABRIEL JONES OF ESSEX AND CULPEPER COUNTIES, VIRGINIA. by Mildred Conway Jones — Originally shared by SusanMiller383  10 Sep 2014 on Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah: 00639422-0001-0000-0000-000000000000

(42) VA Soldiers of 1776, p 521. http://interactive.ancestryinstitution.com/48645/VASoldiers1776-000783-5

(43) Culpeper Minutemen from Wikipedia.com. This page was last edited on 14 November 2017, at 21:53.Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

(44) Revolutionary War Records: Virginia–Section II. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Published on Ancestry 11/9/2007Updated11/9/2007

(45) 1st Virginia State Regiment from Wikipedia.com. This page was last edited on 17 November 2017, at 16:30.Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.

(46) U.S. Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783AuthorAncestry.comPublisherOnline publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data – Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M246, 138 rolls); War Department Collection of Revolutionary War Records, Record Group 93; N

(47) U.S. Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783AuthorAncestry.comPublisherOnline publication – Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.Original data – Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M246, 138 rolls); War Department Collection of Revolutionary War Records, (John Camp final pay stub for Valley Forge)

(48) North Carolina Taxpayers, 1701-1786 Vol. 1-2 Genealogical Pub. Co. Inc., Baltimore, Ohio 1989

(49) North Carolina Taxpayers, 1701-1786 Vol. 1 -2 Genealogical Pub. Co. Inc.,Baltimore, Ohio 1989.

(50) North Carolina, Land Grant Files, 1693-1960 for John Camp, Tryon County, 1779. Ancestry.com. North Carolina, Land Grant Files, 1693-1960 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2016.Original data: North Carolina Land Grants. Microfilm publication, 770 rolls. North Carolina State Archives, Raleigh, North Carolina.

(51) The American Revolution in South Carolina: The Spartan Regiment of Militia. Note: Online source: http://www.carolana.com/SC/Revolution/patriot_militia_sc_spartan_regiment.html. Publisher© 2007 – J.D. Lewis – PO Box 1188 – Little River, SC 29566 – All Rights Reserved

(52) Alderman, Pat. The Overmountain Men. Overmountain Press; Second edition edition (January 1, 1986)

(53) Mrs. Sara Sullivan Ervin of War Shoals, SC. a descendant of John Camp and Mary Tarplely through their daughter Kezziah Camp who married Benjamin Arnold, reprinted from Camp-Kemp Family Hist. p. 48 -50

(54) Carol Frazier, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Available online at: https://www.ancestry.com/mediaui-viewer/collection/1030/tree/26000381/person/5093194797/media/699aee14-2c35-423f-9cfa-1d4f3b87bfa3?_phsrc=KDF31&usePUBJs=true

(55) Deason Smith.  SULLIVAN’S COMPANY ROSTER AND THE PROBLEM OF ENTRENCHED DISINFORMATION, 1/28/05  email – adeasons@earthlink.net; http://www.next1000.com/family/EC/sc.soldiers.html

(56) DAR Daughters of the American Revolution Genealogy Research. Ancestor Search. John Camp: http://services.dar.org/Public/DAR_Research/search_adb/?action=full&p_id=A0185

(57) Hedy Hughes Newton, RUTHERFORD Co NC ABSTRACTS OF MINUTES, COURT OF PLEAS AND QUARTER SESSIONS; 1779-1786;; pp 45,46; DAR Library, Washington DC

(58) Spartanburg County, South Carolina Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1799. By: Brent Holcomb, Pub. 1979, 325 pages, Soft Cover, Index, ISBN #0-89308-175-2. Southern Historical Press (September 2, 1994)

(59) Deed Book MQ, page 49 – 28 -1792, recorded June 3, 1795. Record Books of Greenville County, South Carolina.

(60) South Carolina Archives on line, doc. #S213192, vol. 0037, page 00116. item 001

(61) Jug Tavern from the Winder, Georgia History Website/City of Winder, GA – Winder City Hall, 25 East Midland Avenue, Winder, GA 30680 | Copyright: 2018. Vision TM. Available online at https://www.cityofwinder.com/about/winder-history/jug-tavern

(62) Barrow County from the Winder, Georgia History Website/City of Winder, GA-Winder City Hall, 25 east Midland Avenue, Winder, GA 3680/ Copyright: 2018. Vision TM. Available online at https://www.cityofwinder.com/about/winder-history/barrow-county

(63) Mann, Col. Robt. Nevelle and Cathrine Cleek Mann, Camp-Kemp Family Hist. Vol. I – II, 1969, Cedar Bluff, Alabama 35959

(64) Georgia, Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892. Author: Ancestry.com. Publisher: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. Publisher Date:2011. Publisher Location: Provo, UT, USA

(65) Photocopy in files of L. C. Preston, Ref. B05.08:1783. (57)

(66) From: TrlHkr@aol.com; To: CAMP-L@rootsweb.com; Date: Friday, November 06, 1998 10:47 PM; Subject: Re: John Camp’s Burial Site. Camp Family Discussion Board. Available online at http://www.rootsweb.com. Posted to Ancestry.com by John Janacek on 21 Oct 2010, https://www.ancestry.com/connect/Profile/001231e2-0001-0000-0000-000000000000

ADDENDUM:  The 1st Virginia State Regiment

1st Virginia State Regiment

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Virginia_State_Regiment Updated: 2016-10-29T20:27Z

The 1st Virginia State Regiment was a regiment of Virginia Militia that fought during the American Revolutionary War. The regiment was authorized by the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia in December 1776 as a force of regular troops for the Commonwealth’s defense. In 1777, Virginia had difficulty meeting its quota for the regular line of the Continental Army. As a result, in July 1777 under the command of Colonel George Gibson, the regiment began a march North to temporarily join the Continental Army in the Philadelphia Campaign.[1][2] In January 1778, the Virginia General Assembly passed an act directing that the 1st Virginia State Regiment “now in Continental service, be continued in said service instead of the Ninth Virginia Regiment, made prisoners by the enemy in the Battle of Germantown.”[3][4] The regiment camped at Valley Forge in the winter of 1777-78 and at Middlebrook in the winter of 1778-79 and participated in the Battle of Monmouth. The regiment remained in the service of the Continental Army until late 1779 when redeployed Virginia.[5][3] Unlike the standard division of eight found in the regular line regiments of the Continental Army, the 1st Virginia State Regiment consisted of ten companies including one of light infantry.

Contents 1 Field Officers 2 Company Commanders 3 References 4 External links

Field Officers

Colonel George Gibson

Lt. Colonel William Brent Lt.

Colonel John Allison

Major Thomas Meriweather

Company Commanders

Captain Thomas “Ol’Henry” Pollard

Captain William Hoffler

Captain Thomas Ewell

Captain Windsor Brown

Captain John Nicholas

Captain John Holt (replaced Capt. Nicholas)

Captain William Payne

Captain Charles Ewell (replaced Capt. Payne)

Captain John Lee

Captain Thomas Armistead (replaced Capt. Lee)

Captain Thomas Meriweather (promoted to Major)

Captain John Shields (replaced Capt. Meriweather)

Captain William Campbell (replaced Capt. Shields)

Captain John Camp

Captain Angus Rucker (replaced Capt. Camp)

Captain Jacob Valentine (replaced Capt. Rucker)

Captain Abner Crump

Captain Thomas Hamilton References

^ Flagg, C.A. and Waters, W.O.(1913). “Virginia Soldier’s in the Revolution.” The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography , Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 337-346. ^

Wright, Robert K. The Continental Army. Center of Military History, United States Army, 1983. p. 147 ^

A B Flagg (1913) pp. 337-346. ^

Shelby, John E. The Revolution in Virginia, 1775-1783. University of Virginia Press, 1988. p. 135. ^

Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783 (National Archives Microfilm Publication M246). Roll Box Nos. 93 and 94.

External links The Muster Roll Project: The Friends of the Valley Forge Park

***

 

Off to Georgia–Introduction: The Beall, Grogan, Joyce, Hill and Camp Families

Off to Georgia–Part One: Minnie Brengle Grogan (1869-1948)

Off to Georgia–Part Two: Martin Grogan (1828-1891)

Off to Georgia–Part Three: Elizabeth Joyce (1800-1848)

Off to Georgia–Part Four: Margaret Peggy Hill ) (1785-1848)

Off to Georgia–Part Five: Annie Naomi Camp (1762-1853)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thought on “Part Six: Off to Georgia–“Will the Real John Camp—?” [Lieut/Capt. John “Caswell” Camp (1743-1822)]

  1. Hello Barbara, I just wanted to say thank you for providing such an excellent write up of the Camp family. I hit the tangled web of Camp misinformation in my own research through ancestry and was feeling quite frustrated until I came across your blog. John “Caswell” Camp is my 7th great grandfather—something I feel I can now confidently say thanks to all of the incredible sources you’ve shared here. Take care and good luck with the rest of your work!

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