Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–The Second Family: Part One–Angeline Spence (1811-1860) and David Lemasters (1795-1848)

Lewis & Clark Statue, St. Charles, Missouri--along the River. (I've had this in my files for a number of years. No information about original source.)

Lewis & Clark Statue, St. Charles, Missouri–overlooking the River. (I’ve had this in my files for a number of years. No information about original source.)

 

Robert Bell came from Guilford County, North Carolina in 1783 and settled near Bledsoe’s Lick in Sumner County. Later he moved to Mill Creek, 10 miles Southeast of Nashville. He died February 1816 of small pox, aged about 85 years. He was twice married and had a total of 19 children: six by his first wife and 13  by his second wife, Mary. His first wife’s name is not known(1)

Capt. Robert Bell was born December 1736 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died March 26, 1816 in Davidson County, Tennessee. He was the son of John Bell (1710-1750), who was born in New York and who died in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and Elizabeth Fell. His first wife was Katherine Walker (1742-1773). Their children were: (1) Mary Bell (1763-1827); (2) Sarah Bell, who died in 1821; (3) Rebecca Bell, who died in 1816; (4) John Bell, who died in 1829; (5) Abraham Bell, who died in 1769; (6) Samuel Bell (1766-1836); (7) Ann Bell (1768-1860); (8) Catherine Walker Bell (1770-1857); (9) Robert Fielding Bell (1773-1853). [Note: I did not extend these lines because I am uncertain how accurate they are!]

His second wife was Mary Jane Boyd, who was born in 1754 in North Carolina, and who died in childbirth July 24, 1795 in Davidson County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of John Boyd (1720-1766) and Rebecca (1730-1758) Their children were:

  1. James Bell (1777-1823). James was born August 23, 1777 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died June 23, 1823 in Wilson County, Tennessee. His wife was Mary Dean (1777-1829)
  2. Hugh F. Bell (1779-1850). Hugh was born May 1, 1779 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died in 1850 in Pontotoc, Mississippi. His wife was Margaret McKinney (1781-1840). Their children were: (a) Caroline Bell (1802-1887); (b) Zilpha Bell (1803-1889); (c) Alfred Bell, born 1805; (d) Paris Dooley Bell (b. 1807); (e) Florence M. Bell (1812-1872); (f) Jane Bell, born 1814; (g) Robert Allen Bell (1816-1896); (h) Mary Boyd Bell (1817-1864); (I) James Daniel Bell (1818-1882); (j) Adeline Bell, born 1827.
  3. Daniel Bell (1780-1814). Daniel was born in Guilford County, North Carolina in 1780, and he died in New Orleans, Louisiana in 1814.
  4. Francis Marion Bell (1782-1866). Francis was born November 23, 1782 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and he died June 21, 1866 in Talula, Menard, Illinois. His first wife was Peggy Bails (1789-1807), and his second wife was Elizabeth Allen (1790-1835), by whom he had his children.  Their children were: (a) Margaret Patsy Bell (1809-1892); (b) Margaret Bell (1810-1885); (c) Thomas Allen Bell (1811-1870); (d) Mary Bell (1812-1902); (e) Andrew Jackson Bell (b. 1814); (f) Robert Washington Bell (1814-1845); (g) Daniel R. Bell (1815-1868); (h) Zachariah Bell (1817-1854); (I) Francis Marion Bell (1819-1879); (j) Margery Ann Bell (1822-1858); (k) John Jefferson Bell (1823-1875); (l) William Carrol bell (1826-1900).
  5. William Bell (1784-1850). William was born in Guilford County, North Carolina about 1784, and he died after 1850 in Sumner County, Tennessee.
  6. David Bell (1786-1863). David was born July 2, 1786 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died August 1, 1863 in Robertson County, Tennessee.
  7. Thomas Bell (1789-1879). Thomas was born September 13, 1789 in Guilford County, North Carolina, and he died in September 1879 of pericarditis in Rutherford County, Tennessee. His first was Martha Edmiston (1797-1845). Their children were: (a) George D. Bell (b. 1818); (b) Robert F. Bell (b. 1823) and (c) Lycurgus Bell. His second wife’s name was Catherine, born 1816.
  8. Nathaniel Bell (1790-1844). Nathaniel was born May 3, 1790 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and he died in 1844. His wife was Eleanor Johnston (1780-1867).
  9. Sarah “Sally” Bell (1792-1848). Sarah was born in Tennessee in 1792, and she died March 3, 1848 in Greene County, Illinois.  Her husband was John Allen (1792-18410.
  10. Mary Jane Bell (1795-1842). [The subject under discussion here.]

 

Elisha Spence (1776-1835) and Mary Jane Bell (1795-1842)

Mary Jane Bell was born July 24, 1795, probably in Davidson County, Tennessee. In 1810, her father took her to Elisha Spence’s home. The two families knew one another from their time in North Carolina, and they reunited in Davidson County, Tennessee. They lived close to one another south of Nashville. Elisha’s wife had just died in childbirth, and Elisha was in desperate need of help since he had several small children in the household. Jane became a nanny to the children; she bonded with the family. On October 25, 1810, Elisha and Jane Bell married in Davidson County, Tennessee(2). Four children were born of this marriage.

The rest of this article is devoted to those four children and their families. It has been divided into several parts. This one is devoted to the oldest daughter: Angeline Penelope Spence.

.

Angeline Penelope Spence (1811-1860) and David Lemasters (1795-1848)

Angeline Penelope Spence was born about 1811 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died before 1860 in St. Charles, St. Louis, Missouri. She appears to have idolized her older brothers: Samuel and Daniel, and she bonded well with Milly Catherine. She also idolized Levi, but he relocated to North Carolina, so she saw little of him until later. And she became a big sister to the younger children, helping her mother manage the household. A young woman her age appears in the Elisha Spence household on the 1820(3) and 1830 Census(4). Shortly after the 1830 Census, the Elisha Spence family relocated to Madison County, Tennessee, where Elisha died in November 1835(5). After Elisha’s death, the older children began planning their move to Missouri, which they achieved by 1837(6). Angeline wanted to go with them, but her mother did not want to leave Tennessee. By 1840, Jane relocated to Marshall County, Tennessee, where she appears on the Census with her children(7).  Angeline probably moved to Marshall County with her mother; a young woman approximately her age is in the household. The 1840 Census is the last record I could find for her mother. In all likelihood, Jane Bell Spence died in 1842–the year Angeline relocated to Missouri and joined her siblings there. 1842 was also the year when Angeline met her future husband.

David Lemasters was born in 1795 in Virginia, and he died in 1848 in St. Charles, St. Louis, Missouri. His parents were Isaac Lemaster, who was born in Charles County, Maryland in 1748 and who died in St. Charles, St. Louis, Missouri in 1802,  and Nancy Ann Scott (born 1750). His paternal grandparents were Isaac Lemasters, born in Charles County, Maryland in 1728; died in 1802 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and Ann Flint (1730-1802). His paternal great-grandparents were Joseph Lemaster, born in St. Marys, Maryland in 1693; died 1730 in Charles County, Maryland, and Catherine Ward (1695-1730). David came from a large family of true pioneers, many of whom were trailblazers and over-mountain men.

The family of Isaac Lemaster and Nancy Ann Scott follow: [Note: These family records have been terribly confused. I am only including the individuals I can verify.]

  1. Mary Lemasters (1769-1837). Mary was born in Allegany County, Maryland in 1769, and she died in Pike County, Missouri in 1837. She had two husbands: Nathaniel Clark (1772-1792) and Thomas Jefferson Mackey (1774-1858), by whom she had her child: Mary Mackey (1801-1879). According to a biographical account of Thomas Jefferson Mackey:

Hon. Harrison G. Mackey, one of the old and prominent citizens of Pike County. . . .His father was Thomas J. Mackey, born in North Carolina, July 26, 1809. He in turn was the son of THOMAS Sr., also a native of the same State and of Irish ancestry. The latter was born in 1774, and came to Missouri in 1814 from Tennessee, where he had made his home for about ten years. He located in what is now St. Charles County, farming there for about two years, when he moved to what is now Pike County and Calumet Township. He had made a claim of a quarter section of land, but being prospered in his farming interests he added to this acreage until he bacame the possessor of three hundred and twenty acres. Thomas, Sr., was a very public-spirited man, helping forward all movements calculated to aid in the development of his community, and among the enterprises in which he was interested was the first grist mill in the section. He was an intimate friend of Gen. Jackson, and consequently was a strong Democrat in politics. He was a leader in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church in his locality, in the faith of which he died in November, 1858, at the home of his son-in-law in Marion County. He was married to a Miss Masters, and to them were born eleven children. (note – errors noted are that his son Thomas J. was born in Tennessee not North Carolina and he married {Mary} Lemasters not Masters cs (8).

2. Benjamin Evans Lemasters (1784-1842). Benjamin was born in 1780, and he died November 10, 1842 in St. Charles, Missouri. I’m going to extend his line because some of the research I did years ago applies to Benjamin’s household and not to David Lemasters’. According to the Swearingen, Lemasters, Francis, Winfrey Family History Book under “Notes for Benjamin Lemasters:

Benjamin Evans Lemasters: Benjamin served in the military on Jun. 7,1812 in Boone’s Rangers, Missouri Territory. This statement is before the list of men in the unit: “Muster Roll of a company of mounted Rangers under the command of Captain Nathan Boone in the service of the United States commanded by him from 7th June to 31 July 1812.” Listed as a Corporal is Evan Lemasters. He appeared on the census in 1830 and 1840 in St. Charles Co., Missouri(9).

[Note: Nathan Boone was a son of Daniel Boone.]

The Lemasters, Francis, Winfrey book states that Benjamin was born in 1780 in Tennessee; other sources claim that he was born in Monongalia County, Virginia. The Lemasters book identifies his wife as Nancy Jones, who was born about 1786 in Blount County, Tennessee. Other sources identify his wife as Adria Journey (b. 1781), who may have been a second wife. The Lemasters, Francis, Winfrey book identifies the  children of Benjamin Lemasters and Nancy Jones as:

i. Isaac Lawrence  Lemasters, born Bet. 1816 – 1820 in Missouri; died Feb 2, 1857 in Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri.

ii. Nancy Lemasters, born Bet. 1811 -1815.

iii. Mary Lemasters, born Dec 21, 1815 in Missouri; died 1890 in Marysville, Nodaway CO., Missouri.

iv. Daughter Lemasters, born Bet. 1802- 1817.

v. Audrey Lemasters.

vi. Benjamin Franklin Lemasters, born Nov 10, 1824; died 1856 in Carrollton, Carroll Co., Missouri.

vii. Amanda “Manda” Lemasters.

viii. Martha Lemasters, born Bet. 1821 – 1825.

The two most important references for my purposes here center upon Isaac Lawrence Lemasters (b. bet 1816-1820); d. 1857) and Nancy Jane Lemasters (1815-1860).

Isaac Lawrence Lemasters was born in St. Charles, Missouri in 1817, and he died February 2, 1857 in Carrollton, Carroll, Missouri. His first wife was Jane Henry (1823-1850), by whom he had his children, and his second wife was Elizabeth Elliott, about whom nothing is known. The children of Isaac Lemasters and Jane Henry were: (a) Abraham Lemasters (1843-1858); (b) John A. Lemasters (1844-1858); (c) David Lemasters (1848-aft 1860); (d) Georgeann “Ann” Lemasters (1849-1904); (e) George W. Lemasters (1849-1912).  David, Ann and George all appear on the 1860 Census for Isaac’s sister, Nancy, in Carroll County, Missouri(10). She was a widow, since her husband had died the previous year, and she took in Isaac’s three children with her own.

Nancy was born in St. Charles, Missouri in 1815, and she died after August 29, 1860 in Sugar Tree, Carroll County, Missouri. Her husband was William H. Harrison (1815-1859). Their children were: (a) Sophia Harrison (1838-1903); (b) Andrew E. Harrison (b. 1839); (c) Audrey Elizabeth Harrison (1840-1928); (d) William H. Harrison (b. 1846); Nancy Harrison (1846-1893); and Amanda T. Harrison (b. 1849).

(When I first started doing this research, I thought David, Ann and George were David Lemasters’ children. They were not.)

Returning to the children of Isaac Lemasters and Nancy Ann Scott:

3. Nancy Ann Lemaster (1786-1860). Nancy was born in 1786. Some people think she was born in Virginia. She died in Pike County, Missouri April 27, 1860. Her husband was John Mackey (1766-1840), and their son was Thomas Mackey (1809-1876).

4. David Lemasters (1795-1848). Under discussion here.

David Lemasters was born in Virginia in 1795, and he died January 7, 1848 in St. Charles, Missouri. David was a wanderer and an adventurer. According to The Jasper County History:

The First Permanent Settlements

The honor of having made the first permanent settlement in Jasper county belongs to Thacker Vivion, an emigrant from Kentucky, who located at the spring at the foot of the hill in Sarcoxie, about a stone­s throw southwest of the railroad depot at that place. Vivion is said to have been the first white man who settled permanently in the region of country west of the Turnback River in Lawrence County. He went to Texas about thirty years ago, and at a recent date was still living in that state. About the same time came John M. Fullerton, also from Kentucky, and settled near Sarcoxie where he died about the year 1850. These settlers were undisturbed for a year or two, but other pioneers soon began to make their appearance and to occupy the beautiful and promising country. Ephraim Beasly, Hiram Hanford, Ephraim Jenkins, and Thomas Boxly all came in the Spring of 1833. Mr. Beasley settled on Centre Creek, four mileswest of Sarcoxie, on the place now owned by Stephen M. Hood. Jenkins made his home on the creek which now bears his name a mile or two from Dr. Moss. ís William and Tryon Gibson arrived a little later in the year 1833. Tryon settled on the present site of the High Hill School House five miles southwest of Carthage. Abraham Onstott, the father of Judge John Onstott arrived with his family from Indiana, and stopped where Sarcoxie is now on the 13th of November, 1833, a night made memorable by the falling of the stars. Onstott remained there two or three weeks and then settled five miles south of Carthage. He lived there till 1860, and then removed to Texas and died there. Judge Onstott, his son, is now in all probability the oldest male settler in the County, and has lived within its limits longer than any other man. In the fall of 1833 David Lemasters also came to the County, and made a location on Centre Creek, on the farm now occupied by Thomas Alexander, five miles southwest of Carthage(11).

Like his brother, Benjamin Evans Lemasters, David appears on the 1810 Census in the Louisiana and Missouri Territory in “Muster Roll of a Company of mounted Rangers under the command of Captain Nathan Boone”-rank: Private; appointment or enlistment: 18 Jun18 Jun 1812; to what time: 12 months to 18 Jun 1813…”(12)

About 1816, David married Ann Mackey (1793-bef. 1843) in the Missouri-Louisiana Territory. She was the daughter of James Mackey (1759-1834) and Rebecca Scott (1767-1818), and she came from North Carolina. They had a number of children. However, I have only been able to identify the name of one daughter. The 1830 Census for Pike County, Missouri indicates 1 m -5; 1 m 5-9; 1 m 10-14; 1 m 30-39(13). The same census indicates 1 f -5; 1 f 5-9; 1 f 10-14; 1 f 30-39. The 1840 Census for Marion, Newton County, Missouri indicates 2 m -5; 3 m 5-9; 1 m 10-14; 1 m 15-19; 1 m 20-29; 1 m 40-49. It also indicates 3 f -5; 1 f 10-14; 1 f 15-19; 1 f 20-29(14).  Ann Mackey died before 1843. It is possible the children all went to live with other relatives, with only one of them staying with their father. It is also possible that some of them died. The only known child appears below:

Jane Lemasters was born October 28, 1817 in St. Charles County, Missouri, and she died June 19, 1894 in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri. On July 23, 1835, she married John Wesley Gibson (1815-1869) in Jasper County, Missouri. Their children follow: (a) Wesley Gibson (1836-1863); (b) Benjamin F. Gibson (1838-1861); (c) Rebecca A. Gibson (1841-1874); (d) John Wesley Gibson (1843-1875); (e) Isaac N. Gibson (1847-1881); (f) Terry W. Gibson (1850-1871); (g) Eliza M. Gibson (1852-1856); (h) Mahala E. Gibson (1854-1916); (I) Mary A. Gibson (1856-1857); (j) Sarah Elizabeth Gibson (1858-1944). There is a Gibson Cemetery between Carthage and Webb City, Missouri where all of these people are buried.

According  to the Jasper County Biographical History:

Mrs. Jane Gibson.  It is half a century this fall, 1883, since Mrs. Gibson first landed within the borders of Jasper County, Mo., where she has lived almost uninterruptedly for fifty years.  She is, therefore, almost the first white settle who came to this county, and one of a very few who still survive.  Mrs. Gibson was born in St. Charles County, Mo., Oct. 28, 1817, where she was raised until quite a young woman.  Mrs. Gibson was married July 23, 1835, to John W. Gibson, who was born in Tennessee, Nov. 10, 1815.  Their children are Wesley, Benjamin F., John W., Isaac N., T. W., Rebecca A., Martha J., Eliza M., Mahala E., Mary A., and Sarah E.  Mr. John Gibson, her husband, died in December, 1869, and with several of the family is buried near the house he built in an early day, in 1835, in which his widow still resides.  Mrs. Gibson survives all her family but  three children, and is still smart and enjoys good health.  Mr. Joh Gibson entered nearly a section of land on the banks of Center Creek, and it is unexcelled for fertility and location.  The estate has been mostly divided up among the children and heirs.  Only a small homestead is reserved by the widow during her life.  Her father (David Lemasters) and father-in-law (Tryon or John T Gibson?) used to own slaves previous to the war, and they took them to Texas for protection.  Mrs. Gibson has experienced the hardships and privations of pioneer settlement.  She has planted corn in the sod and an ax, and the only bread the first season was made from corn pounded up into coarse meal.  Indians, wild game of all kinds, and distant neighbors were the rule, with Springfield and Boonville their trading points.  She has ridden to Sarcoxie horseback, about twenty-five miles, and paid fifty cents a yard for calico, and one dollar a yard for muslin for her wedding dress.  Incidents in her life might be given indefinitely, illustrating the joys as well as toils of her early history, were there space[sic].  Mrs. Gibson is conceded to be among the oldest living settlers of the county, and its history were incomplete without a sketch of her life.  She is a lady of great force of character, decided opinions, she dares to express, whose life is an open book, historic, yet ever new(15).

David Lemasters arrived in Jasper County in 1833, and he left there ten years later.  According to the County History, he was brought up on a charge of forgery in the early days of the court:

The first circuit court was held on the 25th of February, 1841, Judge Charles S. Yancey
presiding. J. P. Osborn acted as sheriff. It is related that that gentleman took a plug of tobacco

from his mouth, stepped to the door of the log shanty about twelve by sixteen feet in size, and
proclaimed to the world at large that the Jasper county circuit court was now in session. That
simple sentence, prefaced of course with the customary “Hear ye, Hear ye,” started the wheels of
the court, which have been running since except during the years of the war, when they became
slightly clogged.

The place of the holding of the first court was at the residence of George Hornback, only a short
distance below the Gaston farm, about two miles west of where the city of Carthage is now
situated. Mr. Hornback at that time kept a small store there, where could be purchased needful
articles, as salt, tobacco and powder. The grand jury, for want of better accommodations, after
receiving their charge from the judge, retired to a large log, and there held their deliberations.
Nothing of great importance was brought before their notice, and only one indictment was found-
-against David Lemasters for forgery, and this was set aside at the subsequent term of court (16).

Angeline Penelope Spence may have arrived  when her services were needed most. David had just been acquitted of the forgery charge in 1841. His wife had died before 1843. He was in desperate need of a nanny–of someone to help organize his household. That’s when Samuel, Daniel and Milly Catherine introduced Angeline to David Lemasters. She settled into his household as his nanny.

David and Angeline bonded quickly.  Prior to Angeline’s arrive, David began making plans to move away from Jasper County, where he had been for ten years. He planned to return to St. Charles, where family members were ready to accept his children into their households.  His daughter, Jane, would remain in Jasper County since she had married and was settled there. David decided there was one more person he wanted to take with him to St. Charles. On May 7, 1843, David Lemasters and Angeline Spence were married(17). [The return date on their certificate was May 11, 1843.] Shortly after that, they left Jasper County for David’s home in St. Charles, Missouri. As far as I can tell from existing records, they did not have any children.

On January 7, 1848, David died intestate in Green, St. Charles, Missouri(18). Angeline’s name appears on his probate file dated January 17, 1848(19). On July 26, 1850, James Green was appointed Administrator to sell his personal property(20). And Angeline had no desire to return to Jasper County.

On July 14, 1853, Angeline married a Lemasters’ family friend in St. Charles by the name of David G. Hutcherson (1797-1879)(21). David Hutcherson was born in Virginia in 1797, and he died in 1879 in Arkansas City, Arkansas. He had several wives and children by all of them except Angeline:

By Sarah Butler, whom he married in Mecklenburg County, Virginia on January 28, 1828:

  1. Peter F. Hutcherson, born 1830
  2. Mary J. Hutcherson, born 1832

By Mary P. Lett, whom he married in Mecklenburg County, Virginia on February 17, 1840:

  1. Caroline S. Hutcherson, born 1840
  2. Demetrius D. Hutcherson, born 1842
  3. Susan G. Hutcherson, born 1847

Angeline died before 1860 in St. Charles, Missouri. David Hutcherson moved to Texas after her death, where he is found on the 1860 Census for Denton(22), Texas. By 1870, he moved to Guadalupe, Texas, where he appears on the Census(23). Then he died in 1879 in Arkansas City, Arkansas.

To Be Continued in Part Two

 

References

(1) Notes from an old Notebook of Compiled Tennessee History. Original Source unknown. Possibly a Davidson County, Tennessee History

(2) Tennessee State Marriage Records about Elisha Spence and Jane Bell. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(3) 1820 Census for Elisha Spence, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(4) 1830 Census for Elisha Spence, Davidson County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(5) Elisha Spence Estate Inventory Filed by Anderson Skillern Nov 1835, Madison County, Tennessee. Copy of original obtained from Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee, 1998.

(6) Samuel P. Spence 1837 Land Deed for Sale of Land in Perry County, Tennessee. Copy obtained from Microfilm. LDS Genealogical Library and Archives. Salt Lake City, Utah.

(7) 1840 Census for Jane Spence, Marshall County, Tennessee. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(8) MARION, RALLS, & PIKE COUNTIES MISSOURI,  Portrait and Biographical Record published 1895
Page 383

(9) “Notes for Benjamin Lemasters,” Swearingen, Lemasters, Francis, Winfrey Family History Book PDF file, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(10) 1860 Census for Nancy Harrison, Carroll County, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(11) “The First Permanent Settlements,” Copied from: Greene County Archives Bulletin Number Forty-three;
Heritage County Atlas Reprints Volume 6. An Illustrated Historical Atlas Map of Jasper County, Mo.
Published by Brink, McDonough & Co., 1876. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(12) U.S. Census Reconstructed Records, 1660-1820 for 1810, David Lemasters, The Missouri-Louisiana Territory. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(13) 1830 Census for Pike County, Missouri, David Lemasters. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(14) 1840 Census for Marion, Newton County, Missouri, David Lemasters. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(15) Jane Lemasters Biography, Jasper County, Missouri Biographical History. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(16)HISTORY OF JASPER COUNTY, MISSOURI 1876 Atlas Pages 2-3 Copied from: Greene County Archives, Bulletin Number Forty-three; Heritage County Atlas Reprints Volume 6, An Illustrated Historical Atlas Map of Jasper County, Mo. Published by Brink, McDonough & Co., 1876. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~judysstuff/jasper/jashist01.htm

(17) Missouri State Marriage Records, Jasper County, Missouri, for David Lemasters and Angeline P. Spence. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(18) David Lemasters Probate File, St. Charles, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(19) David Lemasters Probate File, St. Charles, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(20) David Lemasters Probate File, St. Charles, Missouri. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(21) Missouri State Marriage Records, St. Charles, Missouri, for David G. Hutcherson and Angeline Lemasters. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(22) 1860 Census for Denton, Texas, David G. Hutcherson. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

(23) 1870 Census for Guadalupe, Texas, David G. Hutcherson. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 23 Sep 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

 

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