Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Six: Playing the Naming Game: Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) and the Roden/Wroughton Factor

Chester County, South Carolina Courthouse

Chester County, South Carolina Courthouse

Elisha Spence, his ancestors and their descendants possessed a common habit: whenever someone had a child, he or she would be assigned a name for someone else in the family. I noticed this in my research and as a result, began looking for possible namesakes in the family. And then I hit a stumbling block with Elisha and Susanna Spence’s oldest daughter. Milly Catherine Spence? Was she named for one person or for two? When I could find no Milly or Catherine or Milly Catherine who would qualify in the Spence families, I turned my attention to the Spencer line where I recently discovered my answer.

Sheer frustration drove me downstairs to my collection of research notebooks early last week. I couldn’t write about Milly Catherine Spence until finding the person she was named for! Approximately thirty to forty notebooks line the shelves of my writing bookcase. They even spill out onto the floor beside the case where they are piled high. These notebooks comprise all of my research notes dating back to the early 1990s. I taught morning classes back in those early days. My afternoons were spent in the Denver Public Library or in our campus library looking for answers. I saved all my notes, right or wrong. It is amusing now to look over those notes and see how many directions I undertook before charting a definite course. Such is the case with my old South Carolina notebook. I found it wedged behind other notebooks on the case. And I also found the answer I was seeking. Milly Catherine Spence was named after John Spencer’s first wife!

I’ve already recounted my failed attempts in identifying John Spencer’s first wife. I encountered significant problems in identifying both wives until DNA matches settled the matter concerning the second. The first wife remained a dilemma. At one time, I thought she was Milly Catherine Duncan, John Duncan’s daughter. But that Milly Catherine married Isaac Farmer. They moved to another part of South Carolina, and she lived until 1837. I found another record indicating that a John Spencer married a Sarah (last name unknown)–but then that John Spencer wasn’t mine. So I was back at the drawing board once again. Then in my South Carolina notebook, I found some interesting clues. The first is a passage from South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) regarding the early Baptist Churches in Chester County, South Carolina:

One of the ministers in Sandy River congregation in 1791 was Rev. William Woodward, who, because of the distance from the old church, gathered a distinct group on Lower or Little Sandy River in 1789; this body received separate constitution in 1792. Mr. Woodward then became the minister of the new church and remained in that position until his death. He was assisted for a time after 1793 by Mr. Vandiver, a candidate for the ministry. f643 The church tried Amos Layard’s gift but refused to license him: it extended “Brother Gents’ license of exhortation to preach any place where a door may be opened.” Brother Simonton was apparently treasurer, but it was later decided that this function should belong to the deacon’s office, and Brother Redmond replaced Mr. Simonton. Cases for discipline brought up in the early years include two for joining the Masons, and the authority of the church was strong enough to cause the offending brethren to promise either not to meet with the Masons or to leave the order entirely. The church insisted upon strict observance of the Sabbath, James Hand should have started to market on Monday or Tuesday and thus have avoided traveling and working his horses and slaves on Sunday, as he was forced to do by starting on Friday; other members were reprimanded for walking or riding over their farms on Sunday. A resolution to allow grievances to be laid before the deacons prior to being submitted to the church was soon rescinded. In an interesting trial of a woman accused of knowingly marrying a man already married, the woman’s opinion that the trial committee was prejudiced caused the church to allow her to choose the majority of a new committee which reported in her favor. f644 The membership of Lower Sandy River rose from fifty in 1792 to fifty-five in 1794, but when it entered the Bethel Association in 1803, it numbered thirtytwo. f645 The church is said to have had three buildings, the first on land of Eli Cornwell on Sandy River. About 1800 it was decided to remove the church to a more convenient location. A group of trustees consisting of Elder William Woodward, Richard Evans, James Huey, Daniel Tressels, Henry Carter, Mason Huey, Jacob Dungan, Nobley Coates, and Neguens Whitted bought on October 11, 1802, a lot for three hundred dollars upon which a second wooden building “was erected beyond the cemetery in the direction of Chester” five miles from Chester on the Ashford ferry road. f646 The branch of Pacolet on Fishing Creek, which claims to have been organized in 1792, was so well established in 1793 and 1794 as to have supplies appointed for it by the Bethel Association. Its separate constitution must have taken place in 1795, as in that year Pacolet dismissed nineteen members, and a new church on Fishing Creek called Hopewell entered the Bethel Association. The new church had no minister until 1801 or 1802, when Rev. Samuel Eccles took up the work. He probably remained with the church only through 1803, after which Samuel McCreary, who was at that time a licensed minister, must have preached for them. Hopewell had few members until stirred by the great revival. f647(1)

From South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) by Leah Townsend:
Ahimaas Spencer, 189n, 193, 224+
John Roden, 141+
William Roden, 141n, 147, 147n
William a member of Pacolet, which became Skull Shoals in 1787(2),(3)

I had forgotten all about the Roden family. When I discovered this item in my notebook, I remember writing the name down.

Then came another discovery! While searching into their records, I discovered that I had “danced” with them before!

“Roden” was originally “Wroughton”–a family discussed in my third book: Chasing the Wild Bunch: One Woman’s Journey. The Wroughtens resided in Dorchester County, Maryland. While researching them several years ago, I had no idea that a line of their descendants eventually settled in Chester County, South Carolina!

The Roden/Wroughton Factor

Mary Catherine (“Milly” Catherine) Roden was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and she died in 1784 in Greenville County, South Carolina. It was still 96 District at the time of her death and did not become Greenville County until 1786(4). She was the daughter of Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807) and Mary Potts (1720-1785), the granddaughter of John Roden, Sr. (1685-1720) and Elizabeth Jane Winman (1687-1721), and the great granddaughter of William Wroughton (1663-1746) and Hannah Meredith (1663-1689). It appears that the elder William had three wives: Hannah Meredith (1663-1689), Hannah Susannah “Anna” Mace (1660-1702), and Rachel Wingate (1668-1746). William Wroughton comprised a small section of the book I previously mentioned, so I’ll deal with him first.

A Quaker, William Wroughton was a prominent individual in Dorchester County. When he died May 18, 1746, he left his estate to his oldest son Thomas, provided for his beloved wife, Rachel, and also provided for her daughter Rachel Wroughton, who subsequently married a Pritchett(5). When I conducted my original research on William Wroughton several years ago, I lamented that many of the records were jumbled. It was difficult finding two people who agreed on anything since original Dorchester County, Maryland records were destroyed over time. Based upon my earlier research and the research I have recently completed, the following is an outline for his family:

The children of William Wroughton and Hannah Meredith:
1. Thomas Wroughton (1684-1765)–his father’s chief heir. Thomas was born in 1684 in Dorchester County, Maryland, and he died May 4, 1765. I have no additional information about him.
2. John Wroughton/Roden, Sr. (1685-1720)–Mary “Milly Catherine Roden’s grandfather. John was born in 1685 in Dorchester County, and he died April 24, 1720 in Calvert County, Maryland. His wife was Elizabeth Jane Winman (1687-1721), the daughter of Edward Winman (1640-1702) and Mary (last name unknown). A story about John and his wife follows:

Notes:
John was apparently brought up in Dorchester County, Maryland. He met Elizabeth Winman, who was also being courted by George Wade, Jr. Apparently John was the more persistent of the two in his pursuit of Elizabeth, for they were married in May of 1706(6).

It is possible that John learned a lesson from his brother, Henry, which I will discuss later. It is also interesting to note that shortly after John died in 1720, his wife married George Wade.(7)

The children of John and Elizabeth Wroughton/Roden follow:

(a) John Roden (1707-1787). John was christened March 7, 1707 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(8), and he died in 1787 in South Carolina. I have no additional information about him.
(b) William Roden (1710-1770William was christened October 11, 1710 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(9), and he died in 1770 in Chester County, South Carolina. His wife has been identified as Jane Winman (1712-1762), who may have been a cousin. Their children were: (i) Thomas Roden (1731-1793); (ii) Jeremiah Roden (1737-1821); (iii) William Roden (1738-1799); (iv) John Roden (1739-1821); (v) George Roden (1743-1836); (vi) Zadock Roden (1745-1794). William’s second wife was Mary Willifield.
(c) Sarah Roden, who was christened November 16, 1713 at Christ Church Parish, Calvert County, Maryland(10). I have no additional information about her.
(d) Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807)–Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden’s father. I will detail her family separately.
(e) Ann Roden–I only have her name
(f) Susannah Roden–I only have her name.

What I have learned from these names is that Susannah/Susanna was as much of a Roden/Wroughton name as it was a Toney name! John Roden settled in Frederick County, Maryland. John’s sons moved to South Carolina.

3. William Wroughton (1686-1738). William was born in Dorchester County and died there. He died before his father. I have no information about him.

The children of William Wroughton and Hannah Mace:

1. Dorcas Wroughton (b. 1690). I have no additional information.
2. Henry Wroughton (1695-1747). The note on my ancestral tree reads: “Betrothal to 2nd cousin, Mary Meredith, but the marriage did not take place. Mary married James Robert Ingram”(11).

Mary Meredith (1695-1712) and James Robert Ingram (1692-1757) were my my sixth great grandparents on my father’s Inghram line and James Robert Ingram is my fifth great grandfather on my father’s Stillians line–hence my earlier comment concerning John Roden’s wooing of his wife Elizabeth Winman! (I know nothing else about Henry Wroughton).

3. Josias Wroughton (1695-1761). [He may have been Henry’s twin.] Josias lived his life in Dorchester County. I know nothing more about him, although he did acquire a property in Dorchester County called Lazy Hill on November 15, 1728(12).
4. Ambrose Wroughton (1700-1747). Ambrose lived his life in Dorchester County. I know nothing else about him.

As already noted, William Wroughten and his third wife Rachel Wingate had one daughter: Rachel Wroughten, who was born about 1703 and who married a Pritchett.

The Family of Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. (1715-1807)

Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden’s father Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. was born in 1715 in Calvert County, Maryland, and he died July 7, 1807 in Chester County, South Carolina. His wife was Mary Potts (1720-1785). According to an paragraph attached to my ancestral tree (original author unknown):

Thomas was one of the earliest Roden’s in Chester County, S.C. and he probably came with his brothers Zadoc, John Sr., William, and Jeremiah. Thomas owned 1,172 acres in Camden County. This grant received of the Rt. Hon. Charles Gercil Montagu, the governor of Normandon and Chief of the Province of S.C. Thomas’ estate was administerd 7-17-1809 by Richard Wilkes, with Wm. Wilkes and Alex Wilson. He was in Chester County as of 1764, purchasing land to which his brother, John Sr. was a witness.(13)

Thomas’s brother William had a son named Zadock, so that may be the reference here. The important thing about this paragraph is that it provides a Chester County entry date of 1764 for Thomas.

Thomas married Mary Potts in Anne Arundel County in 1732. A discussion of their family follows:

1. John Roden (1740-1807) John Roden was born in 1740 in Maryland and he died October 6, 1821 in Chester County, South Carolina. I have no additional information for him.

2. George Roden (b. 1743) George was born March 25, 1743 in Calvert County, Maryland, and he died in Kentucky. The date of his death is unknown but it would have been after February 27, 1834 in Graves County, Kentucky George’s story unfolds in his Application for a Pension for Service in the Revolutionary War:

State of Kentucky Graves County: On this 27th day of February 1834 personally appeared before the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County and state aforesaid George Rowdon aged ninety years and eleven months a resident of the said County of Graves and State aforesaid who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832. That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein stated (to wit) he states that he was born in the County of Calvert and State of Maryland on the 25th day of March 1743 (he once had a record of his age but it is now lost out of his possession) — this declarant’s father moved with him from Calvert County Maryland where he deponent was a child said 4 or 5 years old & settled in Frederick County Virginia on the Shenandoah River where this declarant lived with his father until about the year 1763 when he with his father migrated to Camden district in the State of South Carolina. That he first entered the service of the United States in the said district of Camden in State of South Carolina in the month of May in the year 1778 as a private drafted militia man and was placed under the command of Captain John Winn with whom he marched on an expedition against Saint Augustine in East Florida he joined (near Augusta in Georgia) a large corps of troops under the command of General Robert Howe — with whom he marched as far as the Oconee River where he was ordered to stop & stayed with a sick man by Captain Winn and gave him a written order for that purpose he stayed with this sick man (who was afflicted with a swelling in his groin) until the month of September 1778 when he returned home with him where he arrived in the latter part of September 1778 he states that he was in the service of the United States 4 months and 2 weeks this tour to wit under Captain John Winn & General Robert Howe – in the year 1778 and that he received no written discharge. This declarant states that he entered the service of the United States the 2nd time in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina in the month of April 1779 Savannah in Georgia was at this time occupied by the British which caused the Tory population of South Carolina to be troublesome to quell which mounted companies of militia man were kept in continual motion this declarant joined one of these mounted companies at the time and place above stated as a volunteer private furnishing his own horse he states that he entered for 6 months & that the said company was raised by order of General Richard Winn of the South Carolina militia and that said company was placed under the command of Captain __ Threewitts [sic, Threewits] with whom this declarant marched to the plantation of Ankram [sic, Ancrum] on the Congaree [River] where they kept their head quarters about 3 months ranging over & protecting the country from Ancrum’s this declarant with Captain Threewits marched to Orangeburg where they remained stationed 3 months after which this declarant was discharged by Captain Threewits he states that he served 6 months this tour under Captain Threewits and that he was the commanding officer on the expedition. This declarant states that he entered the service of the United States the 3rd time in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina as a drafted private militia man he was drafted for a 6 months tour of duty and was placed in a company commanded by Captain John James he marched with Captain James in the month of March 1782 a place called the four holes not far from Charleston at which place he joined a considerable corps of drafted militia under the command of Colonel Hopkins he remained in the service under these officers stationed occasionally at the four holes until the month of September 1780 in which months he was discharged by Captain James he states that he served 6 months under the above named officers at the time above stated. He states that he entered the service of the United States the 4th time as a mounted volunteer private militia man furnishing his own horse he entered in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina in the month of January 1781 under Captain John McCool & marched with Captain McCool & his company in pursuit of the Tory Colonel Will Cunningham [“Bloody Bill” Cunningham] date pursued the Tories to the Congaree & down that River some distance and after scouring the country for some time we returned home when your declarant was disbanded with the rest of the company by Captain McCool in the month of February 1781 he states he served one month under Captain McCool & that he was the commanding officer on the expedition. He states that he entered the service of the United States the 5th time immediately after his return from the expedition under Captain McCool in the month of February 1781 he was drafted as a private this time by order of General Richard Winn for 4 months in the said district of Camden & State of South Carolina he entered under Captain Lyles & marched to Orangeburg where we joined a Regiment under Colonel Hopkins he states that he remained with Colonel Hopkins at Orangeburg 4 months when he was discharged by Captain Lyles he states that he served 4 months this time under Captain Lyles & Colonel Hopkins he was discharged in the month of June 1781. This declarant served his 6th tour of duty as a private in the year 1781 he was drafted in the said district of Camden and State of South Carolina for a 3 months tour of duty he entered in the month of July 1781 and was placed in a company commanded by Captain __ Martin he marched with Captain Martin to join General Green [sic, Nathanael Greene] but did not reach General Green in consequence of some misconduct of Captain Martin who these are did his company in the beginning of September 1781 just before the battle of the Eutaw Springs. In consequence of which desertion the whole company returned home he states that he served 2 months this tour under Captain Martin. Thus your declarant served 4 months and 2 weeks in the year 1778 under Captain John Winn & General Howe; 6 months under Captain Threewits in the year 1779 — 6 months under Captain John James & Colonel Hopkins in the year 1780 — one month in the same year under Captain John McCool — 4 months under Captain Lyles and Colonel Hopkins in the year 1781 and 2 months in the same year under Captain Martin making in the whole one year and 11 months and 2 weeks besides a variety of small scouting tours which she has not enumerated. He states that he has long since lost all his discharges and that he has no documentary evidence of his services and that he knows of no living witness by whom he can prove his services he states that Asa Dodson, Talbot E. Slaydon, John Clapp, Adam Clapp and Henderson Gregory etc. all his neighbors who will bear ample testimony to his character for veracity and as to his reputation of having been a soldier of the revolution. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state or Territory whatever. This declarant states that he moved from Camden district South Carolina to Warren County Tennessee in the year 1817 & from thence he moved to Madison County Alabama in the year 1821 & from thence he moved to Graves County Kentucky in the year 1830 where he has resided ever since & where he at present resides.
S/ George Rowdon Subscribed & sworn to before the undersigned a Justice of the peace in and for the County & state aforesaid S/ Matthias Travis, JP [William Holifield, a clergyman, and Ervin Anderson gave the standard supporting affidavit.](14)

I find it interesting that George Roden and Levi Spence (Elisha Spence’s second son) were in Graves County, Kentucky about the same period of time. Levi Spence is the subject of Part 5 of this series.

3. William Roden (1745-1800). A copy of William’s will follows. He was born in 1745 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died September 5, 1800 at Brushy Fork, Chester County, South Carolina. His wife was Mary Margaret (1745-1805), by whom he had a son–Jonathan Roden (1775-1854). A copy of the will follows. To view it, click on the image:

William Roden 1800 Will

William Roden 1800 Will(15)

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4. MARY CATHERINE (“MILLY CATHERINE”) RODEN (1754-1784). Mary was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and she died in 1784 in 96 District, South Carolina (what would become Greenville County in 1786). Judging from available Ancestry trees, a number of family researchers believed a child named Mary was in this family, but they knew nothing else about her. Mary’s name is listed as either Mary?? or as Unknown Daughter.

There is an interesting story about Mary. When she was little and people asked her about her name, she would pronounce it “Miwy Catrin!” The family began calling her “Milly!” And so she became known as Milly Catherine from that day forward. And there is something else quite interesting about Milly Catherine Roden. She was probably some degree of cousin with Caroline Toney, although I haven’t discovered that connection as yet. Milly married John Spencer (1750-1801) in Chester County, South Carolina in 1769, and returned with him to 96 District. Milly Catherine and John would have three sons. I’ve already discussed them earlier, so I will not go into detail here. However, I will list them separately and add additional information I have discovered about them:

Levi Spencer (1770-1844). (A Levi Roden will appear in one of the family groups listed below. They were born about the same period of time. One of them was named for the other. And, of course and as already noted, Levi Spence was named after Levi Spencer). I have figured out why Levi Spencer opted to go to Georgia. A number of his Roden cousins went from South Carolina to Alabama first and then to Georgia. Some of those cousins also went to Alabama and to Georgia by way of Tennessee.

John David Spencer (1775-1820). I’m beginning to think that this was the father’s full time: John David Spencer, Sr.! The argument is well-founded because John David’s grandfather’s full name was William David Spencer. The elder William used his middle name for two sons: William David Spencer and John David Spencer. Young John David was named for his father and his grandfather.

Thomas Spencer (1784-1810). Milly died giving birth to Thomas. He is named for her father: Thomas Winman Roden, Sr. I don’t know his middle name as yet, but his full name may be Thomas Roden Spencer!

John Spencer married Caroline Toney after Milly’s death. This wasn’t a chance meeting. He went to Virginia where he married her. They stayed in Virginia for a couple of years and then returned to Greenville County. He met her through his first wife. I think the two women were closely connected. I also believe Caroline went to 96 District to help Milly with the boys. Two children were born of John Spencer’s second marriage:

Susanna Roden/Rhoda “Susie” Spencer (1785-1810).–my fifth great grandmother! The name Susanna is both a Toney name and a Roden name. Her middle name was Roden and was eventually changed to Rhoda. That is a Toney, Roden, and a Spence name. She became Elisha Spence’s first wife. I also now believe she was specifically named for Jeremiah Roden’s wife. [See below.] [ALSO SEE LINK TO UPDATE AT THE END OF THIS ARTICLE.]

Abraham Spencer (1788-1865). I don’t know the source for Abraham Spencer. I would say it is a Spencer name. It may have also been a Roden name.

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5. Jeremiah Roden (1754-1851). Jeremiah was born November 3, 1754 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died January 1, 1851 in DeKalb County, Alabama. He would have been Milly’s twin. Jeremiah fought in the Revolutionary War, but his pension application was eventually rejected the year after his death(16). His wife was Susanna Kirkland (1755-1855), whom he married April 28, 1784 in Fairfield County, South Carolina. Susanna Spencer, daughter of John Spencer and Caroline Toney, may well have been named for her since Susanna Spencer was born the following year! And Jeremiah was Milly Catherine’s twin! Jeremiah and Susannah Roden had the following children: (a) Margaret Roden (1784-1874); (b) John B. Roden (1787-1876); (c) Jeremiah Roden (1792-1836); (d) Benjamin Roden (1795-1851); (e) Nancy Roden (1801-1880).

6. Thomas Winman Roden, Jr. (1758-1793). Thomas was born in 1758 in Frederick County, Maryland, and he died in June 1793 in Chester County, South Carolina. Thomas is rather unique in the Thomas Sr. family. While his brothers fought on the side of the Patriots in the American Revolution, Thomas Jr. remained a loyalist. I believe his loyalty to England did not arise out of any great love for the Monarchy. For the most part, the Rodens were Baptists and according to Leah Townsend, some Baptist groups were “nonresistant” or pacifistic in sentiment(17). Thomas Jr. may have belonged to a pacifist Baptist group. I don’t know how this issue settled with the rest of his family, but I believe that he and the John Spencer family were close. I say this because of the “naming game” played out when Thomas and his sister Milly named their children. Thomas married Mary Brown (1758-1790) in Anne Arundel County, Maryland in 1732. Their children follow. [Note: I will expound on some of them because of their names.]

a. Thomas Roden, born 1774. He may have died young. I know nothing else about him.
b. Alice Roden (1776-1855). Alice was born in 1776 in Chester County, South Carolina, and she died in Chester County July 28, 1855. She married Richard Wilkes (1769-1840). Their children were: (i) Mary Wilkes (1795-1851); (ii) Thomas Wilkes (1796-1838); (iii) Martha Wilkes (1798-1859); (iv) Lydia Wilkes (1802-1842); (v) Nancy Wilkes, b. 1803; (vi) Regina Wilkes, b. 1805; (vii) John Wesley Wilkes (1809-1825)

c. LEVI RODEN (1779-1852). Levi was born nine years after Levi Spencer. He was born in Chester County, South Carolina in 1779, and he died in Tippah, Mississippi on April 15, 1852. His wife was Malvina Selina Blank (1780-1842). Their children were: (a) Sarah Roden (1799-1870); (b) Allisee Frances Roden (1801-1880); (c) Spencer William Roden (1801-1856); (d) Elizabeth Frances Roden (1808-1878); (e) Polly Roden (1809-1850); (f) Joshua Emory Roden (1810-1894); (g) Lavinia Roden (1816-1866); (h) Savilla Roden (1820-1866); (i) Levicy Roden (b. 1822). His second wife was Elizabeth “Betty” Isbell (1799-1856). I believe she may well connect with the Isbell family I wrote about in my third book referenced above, but I haven’t confirmed that as yet.

d. John B. Franklin Roden (1785-1870). John was born in Chester County, South Carolina in 1785, and he died in 1870 in DeKalb County, Alabama. His wife was Catherine Jane (Roden) (1796-1870). Their children were (a) Sarah “Sallie” Roden (1815-1865); (b) George Washington Roden (1821-1916); (c) John Harrison Roden (1826-1900); (d) Archibald C. Rodden (b. 1833); (e) Mary E. Roden (b. 1835).

e. WILLIAM SPENCER RODEN (1790-1850). William was born in 1790 in South Carolina, and he died in 1850 in Blount County, Alabama. He married Mary Catherine Mayfield (1792-1834) in 1810 in Alabama. Their children were: (i) William Brassell Roden (1812-1884); (ii) Malinda Roden (b. 1827); (iii) Miller Roden (b. 1834).

7. Savilla Roden (1759-1854).Savilla was born in Frederick County, Maryland in 1759, and she died July 23, 1844 in Clinton, Greene County, Alabama. She married Moses Hill about 1780 in Chester County, South Carolina. He died in 1821. Their children were: (a) Thomas Hill, born 1780; (b) James Hill, born 1782; (c) Elizabeth Harrison Hill (1793-1838); (d) Moses Berry Hill (1795-1824); (e) Harriet Windham Hill (b. 1801); (f)George Washington Hill (b. 1803); (g) Rebecca Carlisle Hill (1807-1842); (h) Littleton Hill; and (I) Sarah Hill.

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After reviewing all my evidence, I have come to one conclusion!

John Spencer’s first wife was Mary “Milly” Catherine Roden.

I still have a lot of work to do on this. I hope to find the connecting link between the Toney family and the Wroughton/Roden family. All of that could take some time. (Well, look how long it has taken me to reach this point!)

The Wroughten/Roden family will be put on hold for a while. Now, I need to catch my breath and then turn my attention once again to the Spences.

This article has been updated. Click here for the update!

To Be Continued in Part Seven with Milly Catherine Spence and Lewis Jones

References

(1) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.
(2) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805). pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.
(3) Beall, Barbara Inman, Notebook of South Carolina Research (Collection of Published Sources), (1994-2015).
(4) Beall, Barbara Inman, Notebook of South Carolina Research (Collection of Published Sources), (1994-2015)
(4) William Wroughton Will, May 1746. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(5) “Rivers Through Time; The History of the Roden and Milwee Families” by Johnnie Geneva Roden Dole Gambel, Chap IV, Page 1. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(6) U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 about Elizabeth Winman Roden and George Wade. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about John Roden (Rhodin). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about William Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about Sarah Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches about Henry Wroughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11) Settlers of Maryland (1679-1783) about Josias Wroughton. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12) Paragraph titled “Land” about Thomas Winman Roden, Sr., Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(13) George Roden (Rowden) Revolutionary War Application for Pension, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2014. Available online at: http://www.ancestry.com
(14) William Roden 1800 Will (Image of Transcription), Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Dated Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15) Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900 about Jeremiah Roden. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: 24 June 2015. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16) Townsend, Leah, South Carolina Baptists (1670-1805) pdf file from landmarkbaptist.org. Date Accessed: 25 June 2015.

2 thoughts on “Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Six: Playing the Naming Game: Milly Catherine Spence (1802-1875) and the Roden/Wroughton Factor

  1. I am currently researching the roden family in the attempt to join the Jamestown society and have found your information to be amazing – it has helped me to find out information that I didn’t have thank you so much

    • This is the second time I’ve encountered that family in different family lines. They intermarried with family members so I am not directly related to them. Their records have been so jumbled, I had to unscramble what I could in order to make sense of them. Everyone seems to have a different opinion about them! I’m so glad you found my article useful.

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