Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Three: The Burke County, North Carolina Inman Family

inman_coa

The only daughter of John Spencer and Caroline Toney, Susanna Roden/Rhoda “Susie” Spencer was born in Goochland County, Virginia in 1785. About 1788 or 1789, her family moved to Greenville County, South Carolina, where her father owned property. She was between ten and twelve years of age when Elisha Spence arrived on the scene with the David Jones family. In all likelihood they met at church. And the possibility also exists the newcomers were invited to the Spencer home for dinner. What is apparent is that Elisha’s early friends in the area were Susie’s brothers–particularly Levi and John David, who were closer to his age. What is also apparent is that Elisha made a definite impression on the young Susanna. He probably realized it at first and was more amused about it than anything else. After all, she was “just a little girl!” Susie viewed herself in different terms. She once announced to her mother, “I’m going to marry him!” Her mother laughed and said, “Well, you’re a little young to be thinking about that.”

But Susie did think about it and made her presence known whenever possible, most of her presences involving some sort of mischief. Some of her pranks resulted in a dip in the creek. To Elisha, Susie was a “little girl” who could sometimes behave like a “little pest!”

Then Elisha met someone who visited Greenville County from time to time. His name was Samuel Inman, and he lived in Burke County, North Carolina. Samuel’s daughter Elizabeth would later marry Elisha’s son, Samuel. But in the mid-1790s, Elisha Spence and Samuel Inman were friends. Elisha was often invited to spend time with the Inmans in Burke County, something that annoyed Susie. She worried that Elisha would move to Burke County and that she would never see him again. But she was more annoyed over discussions relating to Tennessee and future plans to move there. The David Jones family definitely planned to move there. The Samuel Inman family also talked about going. And Elisha’s interest greatly increased whenever the subject came up. Susie had no idea where Tennessee was located, but she was certain it was some distance from Greenville County. Tennessee frightened her more than Burke County, especially when her own brothers–particularly John David–talked about moving there as well. No journals exist, nor do other writings that depict their early relationship. The following is a fictionalized account of what could have happened.

One day, John Spencer went to Charleston on business. He promised to take Susie with him, and he also invited Elisha to go along. Elisha recalled stories about his father’s experiences in Charleston, so he definitely wanted to see it. John took them down to the harbor and showed them where the prison ships were located. Elisha stared across the water, imagining the ships and his father aboard one of them.

“Lisha–was your father out there?” Susie asked.

“Yes, he was. He was a prisoner on one of those ships.”

“Were they mean to him?”

“Yes, they were!”

“Did they let him go?”

“Finally,” Elisha told her. “He went home to die.”

“Oh!”

Susie slipped her hand into Elisha’s. They were quiet for a while. Presently, they walked away.

It was an event Elisha would remember the rest of his life. Susie remembered it as well.

The Samuel Inman family left Burke County, North Carolina for Davidson County, Tennessee in 1798 with other family members! The David Jones family announced their plans to follow suit in two years.

“I think I might go with them!” she heard Elisha tell her brothers.

The door banged loudly, causing Elisha to turn.

“Was that Susie?” he asked.

“Guess it was!” John David smiled.

“Is something wrong?”

“Guess so!”

“Well, what?”

“You’re the one who said you’re thinkin’ of movin’ to Tennessee!”

Susie stomped across the yard and leaned against a tree. Angry tears filled her eyes. Momentarily she realized someone stood behind her.

“Susie–“

My fourth great-grandparents married in Greenville County, South Carolina in 1799 after Susie turned fifteen. Their son, Samuel Perry Spence–my third great grandmother–was born in Greenville County, South Carolina in 1800. He would marry my third great-grandmother, Elizabeth Inman–Samuel Inman’s daughter–in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1824. Some people believe her full name was Rebecca Elizabeth Inman. That may be true since her oldest daughter’s name was Rebecca. But I have just seen the name Elizabeth on records.

The Inman Family

[The following is a revision of an article written on this blog–“Looking for Elizabeth–Parking in the Southern Inman Family”–dated August 1, 2014.]

In the early 1990s when I first became engaged in genealogy, I discovered that my third great-grandmother’s name was Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872). She became the wife of my third great-grandfather, Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859); they were married May 10, 1824 in Davidson County, Tennessee. While I experienced major breakthroughs on the Spence line in those early days, the southern Inmans left me puzzled. Fortunately and perhaps, unfortunately, my search took me deep into the wilderness. An article titled “The INMAN Family History—America”, discovered on microfilm through the local Family History Center, started me on my journey. The key source used in the article was an earlier piece titled “Nidderdale and the Garden of the Nidd.” When I examined my find, I thought I had died and entered the Gates of Heaven!

Well—no—I didn’t die, and I certainly hadn’t entered the Pearly Gates! But the article introduced me to Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego Inman and to the Daniel Boone story!

According to “The INMAN Family History”—

…”Prior to the Revolutionary, War, 1765, three brothers left their home in England, tradition said on account of a step-mother, and came to America, settling in Virginia, then to North Carolina, afterward to Tennessee…Being accustomed to the luxuries of an English home, it must have required much courage to come to a wilderness where their lives hung by a thread…These three brave souls knew no fear, and upon their arrival became Americans, and in the dark struggle which followed, fought, and one gave up his life for his country.

It is of SHADRACH, MESHACH, and ABEDNEGO INMAN of whom we speak, being sons of John Inman and Henrietta Hardin. John Inman is believed to have followed his sons to this country in 1771. There is no record of other siblings, though the great ocean may have separated them from loved ones in their English home.

We first hear of these brothers in history as starting from North Carolina about 1767 with a party of hunters led by Daniel Boone, on their way to explore the country west of the Cumberland Mountains. One night, after having travelled for days in the snow without food, they were surprised and attacked by the Indians, while asleep, in Middle Tennessee—then a wilderness—near a cave, presumably what is now known as the famous Nicka-jack Cave; nearly all were killed, among them Meshach Inman. Shadrach and Abednego survived, but Shadrach was wounded in the side by a spear. This weapon is still in the possession of his descendants. Abednego was wounded in the forehead by a tomahawk which scar he carried the rest of his life. He hid in a hollow tree where he lived nine days without food…'(1)

I would hate to recount the number of hours I spent in trying to park Elizabeth into one of those families. My three huge southern Inman notebooks bear witness to my struggle. And my discovery of Elizabeth’s father—Samuel Inman (1773-1830)—was purely accidental. I was searching the 1820 Perry County, Tennessee Census for Elizabeth’s husband Samuel Spence when lo and behold—Samuel Inman resided in the same area! Since Samuel Spence married Elizabeth Inman, chances were excellent Samuel Inman was Elizabeth’s father. But another question arose: Who was Samuel Inman?

Ever try to find an empty parking space in a busy mall? My quest for Samuel Inman was like that: I could not find a place to park! A trip to Dandridge, Tennessee didn’t answer my questions. Howard and I visited the Revolutionary Cemetery in town and the courthouse. And I could not find my Samuel in any of the Three-Brother Families.

At first, I thought he belonged to Shadrach.
He didn’t!
Next, I tried Abednego.
No luck!
Finally, I resorted to Meshach.
That led me to a dead end as well.

Gradually, I dismissed the idea that I was directly descended from one of the three brothers!

“So, maybe they were uncles!” I decided.

And if that were the case—who were their brothers?

I could go on forever describing my fender bender demolition derby parking attempts. In addition to the three-brother problem, I was also confronted with the identity of their grandfather. “The INMAN Family History” sent me down the wrong way on a one-way street:

“The family of INMAN, Ionman or Ingman, variously spelled, derived from John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and are therefore descendants of Edward III of England. This family being strong adherents of the House of Lancaster raised a troop in the Royal cause under the Duke of Newcastle, and were at the fatal battle of Marston Moor, where several of the brothers were slain, the rest dispersed and the property confiscated by Cromwell’s party, 1650-1652. Their Coat of Arms is strongly Lancastrian and may have been granted them during the “War of the Roses.

The INMAN family was settled (for five successive generations) at Bowthwaite Grange Netherdale (or Nithisdale) in Old English) County of York, and intermarried with many of the principal families of that period…. In the Civil Wars in England this Robert Inman or “Bold Robin” sided with Parliament against the King, also his son, Michael Inman or Bold Robin, then a youth of eighteen years….”(2)

Ah, an empty parking spot—right?

Wrong–not that I didn’t attempt many times to park Samuel and daughter Elizabeth there!

A descendant of either Michael or of Christopher Inman informed me long ago this wasn’t true, so I disconnected my connection to them. Then I discovered a number of people focused on Robert Inman (1653-1701) of Surry County, Virginia. That connection did not go anywhere either since I could not find solid evidence to support it! In an article titled “The Inman Family of Surry and Sussex Counties, Virginia and Some of their Kin”, Joseph Francis Inman notes:

…A limited amount of research in printed sources from England did not reveal any definite connection with the Inman family of Surry County, Virginia, from which Sussex County was taken in 1754. There were some bearing the name Inman who came to Virginia, probably from England, early in the colonial period as well as some who came much later, but who have not been proven to be relatives of the family in Surrey [sic] County…

Robert Inman is the earliest proven ancestor of the Surry family. He may have been born in Virginia but evidence to that effect has not been found…He is first mentioned in the Surry county records when he was on the tithable list for 1683. He is shown to have been in the Colonial Militia in 1687….

Robert Inman made his will on the 6th day, first month [March] 1698/9 and it was ordered recorded on 3 March 1701/2. The will named his wife Mary, daughter Sarah, and sons Robert and John…(3)

[Note: Despite attempts to link this John with Ezekiel John Inman of this narrative, there is no direct connection between the Surry/Essex, Virginia Inmans and Elizabeth Inman’s family. That does not mean a collateral connection does not exist between the two family groups. To date, the connection has not been found!]

In the late 1990s, I suspended my work on genealogy because a dissertation consumed my time. After the dissertation was behind me, I resumed my family history once again—only to be forced to drop it. My teaching load became too intense. So I waited until retirement before trying it again. 2009 granted me that freedom. When I began charting the Inman-Spence line, I was in for a great surprise!

Talk about a headache! My eyeballs twirled in circles when I discovered what people had done to the southern Inmans over the years. The truth is—there were a number of Inman families in the South. During my years of absence, people had connected all of them in some form or fashion. Hoping to reconnect Elizabeth and Samuel’s lineage somewhere, I realigned them with Meshach. (They didn’t fit there, but I had to do something to get moving). Then I pursued Meshach’s father, who was now known as Ezekiel John Inman. Because I didn’t know what to do next—I reconnected Ezekiel John with Robert of Surry County, Virginia, which was wrong. And I stopped work on the Inman line once again. Another branch on my tree beckoned my interest—a book I dreamed of writing for years. So I forgot all about the Inmans and focused on the Clays, deciding to return to the Inmans later and straighten out the mess!

Three books later, I am now refocusing on the Inmans. One thing I learned during the writing of the three books: it is always best to begin with the basics of what I know and of what I can prove and discard all the rest. I could not prove anything beyond Samuel. But I remembered a document someone sent me years ago concerning a Hezekiah Inman. My rediscovery of that document put me in the right direction. Hezekiah’s wife would create the empty parking space, and Henry Inman’s wife would park the car. I discovered Henry through an online source—a family history called The Descendants of Henry Inman.

Henry Inman?

I had never seen Henry Inman in connection with Ezekiel and the Three Brothers. According to the file, a Henry Inman was the father of Ezekiel John Inman.(4) I began searching for Henry Inman and while a few candidates appeared in early Virginia, I noticed two strong candidates who resided in Maryland—both about the same age and both with the same first name: Henry. This discovery reminded me of an early suggestion that Ezekiel John was born in Maryland—possibly in Frederick County. And since I found two Henrys of particular interest in Anne Arundel and Prince Georges Counties, I decided there had to be a connection. After studying the Hezekiah information, I noticed that he had a son named Henry and that Hezekiah was thought to be born in Frederick County. One thing led to another and soon the pieces fell into place!

The Inmans of Cumberland, England

The story of the Cumberland, England Inmans actually begins in Yorkshire with a John Inman, who was born in Yorkshire in 1620 and who died in Cumberland, England.(5) He was christened in Sedbergh, Yorkshire, England February 7, 1620. John was the son of another John Inman. His wife is unknown, but two of his sons are of importance here: John Inman, who was born in 1649, and Henry Inman, who was born in 1650. Henry (1650) was reportedly transported to Virginia, per the following:

•ID: I18750
Name: Henry INMAN
Reference Number: 18771
Sex: M
Birth: ABT 1650 in England
Occupation: transported to Virginia or Maryland
Note:
Possible progenitor Henry Inman transported possibly to Virginia 1668. Possibly father or grandfather of Henry Inman born about 1690, of Anne Arundel County, Maryland who married Hannah Pinkstone in Maryland about 1712.

The Complete Book of Emigrants, 1607-1776
12 November 1668. Newgate prisoners reprieved to be transported to Barbados [but may have gone to Virginia – see petition of Emanuel Jones of May 1673]. London: Henry Inman;

(complete list: Henry Griffin; Richard Crispe; John Lively; William Field; Henry Inman; Elizabeth Burton, widow; Margaret Griffiths, spinster; Jane Rogers, widow; Mary Edwards alias Symmes, widow. Middlesex: Francis Oakley of Bromley; Elizabeth Betts of St. Giles in the Fields, spinster, [order made in May 1669 for custody of her bastard child delivered in Newgate]; Mary Standley of St. Giles Cripplegate, spinster; Susan Partridge of St. Paul Covent Garden, spinster; Martha Goodman, wife of Edward Goodman of St. Andrew Holborn; Margaret Tattle of St. Giles in the Fields; Mary Jones of St. Paul Covent Garden, spinster; Rose Whitehead of St. Martin in the Fields, spinster; John Cooke of Ruislip; Thomas Draper of St. Giles in the Fields; Isaac Johnson of Stepney; John Eades of Northwood; Emanuel Jones of St. Martin in the Fields; Richard Morgan of St. Giles Cripplegate; James Welling of St. Giles in the Fields; David Sirvin of St. Giles in the Fields. (EB & PRO: C66/3102/3).

13 November 1668. The following apprenticed in Bristol: Nathaniell Lewis to Thomas Pope, 4 years Virginia; Thomas Hill to John Soller, 4 years Virginia. (BR).)
UID: DB77A0F5C5764407B72FEC331B903561B37E
Change Date: 27 JUN 2012

Father: INMAN b: ABT 1620

Marriage1 Spouse Unknown Children
Henry INMAN b: ABT 1691 in Anne Arundel Co, Maryland
Henry Inman (1691) would marry Hannah Pinkstone (born 1693) in Anne Arundel County. Their children follow:
• Violetta Inman (b. 1713)
• William Inman (b. 1715)
• Henry Inman (1718-1719)
• Pinkston Inman (b. 1721)
• Ann Inman (b. 1723) (6)

This branch of the Inman family is collaterally connected with Elizabeth’s ancestors. Her direct connection is with the brother of Henry Inman (1650)—John Inman (born 1649).

Elizabeth’s Line

My seventh great grandfather, John Inman, was christened June 14, 1649 in Burnsall, Yorkshire, England and is registered as a son of John Inman.(7) He relocated to Cumberland, England and settled there. The name of his wife is unknown; however, they had a number of children:
Henry Inman (1689-1730)—my sixth great grandfather. He will be discussed shortly.
• Jane Inman, who was christened October 7, 1692, Saint Bees Parish, Cumberland, England(8)
• Thomas Inman, who was christened May 3, 1694, Saint Bees Parish, Cumberland, England(9)
• Mary Inman, who was christened February 14, 1695, Saint Bees Parish, Cumberland, England)10)
• John Inman, who was christened October 6, 1699, Saint Nicholas, Whitehaven, Cumberland, England.(11)

Henry Inman (1689-1730).(12)(13) On October 25, 1689, Henry Inman was christened in Saint Bees Parish, Cumberland, England—the son of John Inman. Henry appears to have been a mariner, requiring him to travel back and forth across the Atlantic. He arrived in New York in 1711, but it is unknown how long he stayed there.14) At some point, he traveled to Maryland since his cousin Henry (1691) was living in Anne Arundel County. And while in Anne Arundel County, Henry (1689) met and married Susannah Ann Hyatt (1698-1750). She was the daughter of Charles Hyatt (1672-1726) and Sarah Tewkesbury (1672-1726). The children of Charles Hyatt and Sarah Tewkesbury were:
• Seth Hyatt (1694-1750)—he will return momentarily
• Susannah Hyatt (1697-1698)
Susannah “Ann” Hyatt (1698-1750)—She would become Henry Inman’s wife. Susannah was born November 30, 1698 in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, and she was christened October 15, 1699 in St. James Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland.(15)
• Christopher Hyatt, born 1699
• Ann Hyatt (1706-1729)
• Asa Hyatt, born 1706)
• Peter Hyatt (1707-1800)
• Uriah Hyatt, born 1711
• Elizabeth Hyatt, born 1714
• Penelope Hyatt, born 1716
• William E. (Ezekiel) Hyatt Sr. (1717-1794).(16)

Henry Inman (1689) became an associate of the Hyatt family, who removed from Anne Arundel to Prince Georges County , and later settled in Frederick County, Maryland . The town of Hyattsville in Prince Georges County was named after them. One of Susannah’s brothers, Seth Hyatt (1694-1750), becomes important here.

Seth married Alice Davis (1696-1724) in Anne Arundel County. Please note the names of their children:

• Seth Hyatt, Jr. (1718-1769)
• Avarilla Hyatt (1719-1814)
• Neomi Hyatt, b. 1719
• Shadrack Hyatt (1720-1761)
• Meshach Hyatt (1723-1807)
• Abednego Hyatt (1724-1779)(17)

SHADRACH! MESHACH! ABEDNEGO!

The following is from my own family tree after discovering all of this.

Henry Inman (1689-1730) and Susannah Hyatt (1698-1750) married about 1726 and had two sons:

• Ezekiel John Inman (1727-1791)—“Ezekiel” for William Ezekiel Hyatt—Susannah’s brother—and “John” for Henry’s father—John Inman. Ezekiel John Inman was born in Prince Georges, Maryland (Frederick County, today) about 1727, and he died about May 1793 in Burke County, North Carolina. He was the Constable of Linville District in Burke County, North Carolina in 1773, having appeared of record there as early as 1771.(18) He is buried with Henrietta in Lexington, Rockbridge, Virginia. Ezekiel married Hannah Henrietta Hardin (1726-1752), and they had the following children:

o Elisha Inman (sometimes shown as Benjamin Elisha Inman)—“Benjamin” for Hannah’s father (1746-1815) and “Elisha” for one of the Hyatts I am currently investigating.
o Shadrach Hardin Inman, Sr. (1747-1830)—named for Susannah’s brother
o Meshach Inman (1749-1767/71)—named for Susannah’s brother
o Susannah Inman (1750-1816)—named for Susannah
o Abednego Hardin Inman (1752-1831)—named for Susannah’s brother.(19)

Ezekiel’s second wife was Fanny Wakefield (1727-1798). Their children were:

o Lazarus Inman (1755-1781)
o William Wakefield Inman Sr. (1758-1803).(20)

[Note: Instead of being direct ancestors as I originally thought, Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego Inman are my first cousins six times removed! While earlier sources claim they were born in England, they were born in America. Abednego’s name is the only one actually appearing on a ship passenger list. Wealthier men sent their sons to England for their education at this time, which would explain Abednego’s name on the passenger list.(21)]

Hezekiah Inman (1728/30-1778)—“Hezekiah” was a Hyatt name, although it appears among the Inmans in the Northeast. (There was a Hezekiah Hyatt (1745-1788) who may have been named for Hezekiah Inman, but I don’t know that much about him. He came from Maryland where the Hyatts lived, so that is an excellent sign. Supposedly, his father was Elisha Hyatt (b. 1720)—and I am investigating him as well. I mentioned Elisha above). Hezekiah Inman is my fifth great grandfather. The rest of this narrative will be devoted to him.

Hezekiah Inman was born between 1728 and 1730 in Prince Georges, Maryland (Frederick County, today), and he died before October 24, 1778 in Burke County, North Carolina. Henry Inman (1689), the father of Ezekiel and Hezekiah, apparently returned to England about 1730, which he would have done had he been a mariner or had he been involved with shipping in some manner.(22) Henry died in England and was buried there January 28, 1730. His widow Susannah and her two sons moved in with her brother, Seth Hyatt, and the boys became close with their cousins Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego Hyatt! Ezekiel would later name his sons after them.

After their mother’s death in 1750, Hezekiah and Ezekiel left Maryland. Hezekiah wandered down to Augusta County, Virginia, while Ezekiel appears to have gone to Albemarle. In his “Early Inmans of the South,” Randy McConnell notes:

Ezekiel who first appears in confirmed data as an officer in British regular forces between 1754 and 1763 in the French and Indian War, apparently drawn from Albemarle Co., VA. A notation indicates that he owned taxable property in Augusta Co. in 1755, but he was not found when taxes were collected.(5) Ezekiel married Hannah or Henrietta Hardin, probably in Frederick Co., VA c. 1740 and remarried to Fanny Wakefield of Albemarle Co. before they moved to Burke Co., NC. He was still living there in 1793, over age 60. Widow Fanny later moved to Blount Co., TN. Because of his three Biblically named sons (Shadrach, Meshack and Abednego), their alleged exploration with Daniel Boone in 1767, and a enormous brood of descendants, Ezekiel’s line has been heavily documented compared to the others.

– Hezekiah, who is mentioned in the estate records of Michael Reilley from 1754 to 1757 in Augusta Co., VA. Hezekiah later moved to Albemarle Co. and probably died in Burke Co., NC. He married a Hiatt/Hyatt and had four sons.(23)

About 1760, Hezekiah returned to Prince George’s County, where he married Mary Jane Hyatt (1740-1793). She was the daughter of Shadrach Hyatt (1720-1761) and Dinah Gaither (1721-1761). (Mary Jane would be known by her second name—Jane Hyatt.) As noted by Randy McConnell, they had four sons:
• Hezekiah Inman (1770-1847)—named for his father. Hezekiah was born about 1770 in Onslow, North Carolina, and he died before September 1847 in Marshall, Mississippi. He married Christiana/Christina (Hyatt?) in 1793 in Burke County, North Carolina. Their children were:
o Anthony Inman (1796-1865)
o Hezekiah Inman, born 1801
o Hannah Inman (1803-1876)
o An Unknown Male Inman, born 1803
o Abraham Inman (1805-1884).(24)

Hezekiah and Christiana divorced between 1814 and 1817 in Williamson County, Tennessee.(25) On August 3, 1824, he married Eliza A. Branch (1803-1897) in Williamson County, Tennessee.(26) They had two children:

o Elizabeth Inman (1826-1853)
o Joseph M. Inman (born 1829)

By 1830, Hezekiah and his wife were in Wayne County, Tennessee,(27) and they relocated to Marshall, Mississippi by 1840(28). Hezekiah died in Marshall, Mississippi in 1847.

• Hyatt Inman, who was born in 1771 in Burke County, North Carolina. He may have died young; I could find no further records about him. He was named for his mother. I believe that Hyatt and Henry were twins.(29)
• Henry Inman (1771-1788). Henry was born in 1771 in Burke County, North Carolina, and he died after 1800 in Burke County, North Carolina.(30) He was named for his grandfather. He was married and had several children, but I do not know any of their names.
Samuel Inman (1773-1830)—my fourth great grandfather. Samuel Inman was born in Burke County, North Carolina in 1773, and he died after the 1820 Census and before the 1830 Census in Perry County, Tennessee.(31) He was named for Samuel Inman (1767-1804)—Meshach Inman’s son. About 1789, Samuel married Mary Williams (1774-1808) in Burke County, North Carolina. She was the daughter of Ambrose Hiram Williams (1730-1795) and Mary Moor (1738-1790). Their children were:

1. Lazarus Inman (1789-aft 1790)
2. Ezekiel Inman (1790-aft 1850) m. Charity (b. 1790). Their children: (a) John Inman (1822-1860); (b) Mary Inman (b. 1828); (c) Rebecca Inman (b. 1850)
3. Abraham (Abe) Inman (1798-1870) m. Sarah Armstrong (b. 1798). Their children: (a) Calvin C. Inman (1829-1910); (b) Nancy Caroline Inman (1830-1885); (c) Martha Inman (b. 1832); (d) David Samuel Spencer “Spence” Inman (1834-1866)
4. Elisha Inman (1805-1870) m. Unknown. Child: Daniel C. Inman (b. 1848). m 2. Sarah Ann Hobbs (1816-1870). Their child: Elizabeth E. Inman (b. 1855).
5. Elizabeth Inman (1808-1872)—my third great grandmother. [Note: Some people believe her full name was Rebecca Elizabeth Inman–a possibility, but I have no record with that name.] Elizabeth was born in 1808 in Davidson County, Tennessee, and she died July 16, 1872 in Marrs Hill Twp., Washington County, Arkansas.(32) Elizabeth married my third great grandfather, Samuel Perry Spence (1800-1859) in Davidson County, Tennessee on May 10, 1824. Their children will appear in Part Four.

Hezekiah Inman died October 24, 1778 in Burke County, North Carolina. He is referenced in Burke County “…as neighbor in Deed to Phillip Burns; survey says ‘next to widow Inman’.(33) His wife remarried in 1790, and her second husband was Ambrose Hiram Williams (1730-1795)—the father of Mary Williams (1774-1808), who married Hezekiah and Jane Hyatt Inman’s son, Samuel Inman (1773-1820). (34) Samuel and Mary Williams Inman became the parents of Elizabeth Inman Spence (1808-1872). Ambrose William’s wife, Mary Moor, died in 1790.

Ambrose Williams and Jane Hyatt Inman had two or three children, but their names are unknown. By 1793, they lived in Gowensville, South Carolina, where Jane died that year. Ambrose died in Gowensville in 1795.

Concerning Ambrose Williams:

Born c. 1730 in Newport, Pembroke, Wales. “Ambrose Williams, was a Welshman. He was a millwright by trade but engaged in farming toward the latter part of his life. He possessed a large property, but was broken up by the depreciation of continental money. He was a Revolutionary War Patriot. He was twice married. His first wife was Mary Moor. They lived in North Carolina before and during the Revolutionary War and had several sons old enough to serve in the war (from 19 Apr 1775 to 4 Jul 1776)*. After the death of Mary Moor he married Jane Inman. He had several children by his second marriage but their names are not available.” *The Revolutionary War actually lasted from April 19, 1775 to September 3, 1783 upon the signing of the Treaty of Paris. Cornwallis surrendered the British troops at Yorktown, Virginia on October 19, 1781.(35)

***

Since writing the Inman portion of this article August 1, 2014, I have received DNA matches on the Spence, Spencer, Toney, Inman, Hyatt, Williams and Moor lines, so I am satisfied that I’m finally heading in the right direction!

To Be Continued in Part Four

REFERENCES

(1)The INMAN Family History—America. (Author unknown); FHS Microfilm, Provo, Utah. Date obtained: ca Summer 1993.
The INMAN Family History—America, (author unknown); FHS Microfilm, Provo, Utah. Date obtained: ca Summer 1993.
(2)Inman, Joseph Francis, “The Inman Family of Surry and Sussex Counties, Virginia and Some of Their Kin,” (1975).
(3) “The Descendants of Henry Inman”, Geneology.com. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/i/n/m/Dawn-M-Inman/PDFGENE15.pdf
(4) Edmund West, comp., Family Data Collection – Marriages, Provo, UT, USA: MyFamily.com, Inc., 2001.
(5)England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 about John Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(6) Ladd, Reed, Cook, Engle, Hamilton, Lennon Ancestors, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(7) Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, A Private Tree, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(8) England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 about Jane Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(9) England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 about Thomas Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(10) England, Select Births and Christenings 1538-1975 about Mary Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(11)England, Select Births and Christenings 1538-1975 about John Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(12)England, Select Births and Christenings, 1538-1975 about Henry Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com.
(13)”England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JQ5H-958 : accessed 01 Aug 2014), Henry Inman, 25 Oct 1689; citing SAINT BEES,CUMBERLAND,ENGLAND, reference ; FHL microfilm 496432.https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JQ5H-958
(14)U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Henry Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(15)Maryland, Births and Christenings Index, 1662-1911 about Susannah Ann Hyatt, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(16)Maryland Hyatt Christening Records, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(17)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(18)Ezekial Inman, Constable of Linville River district 1773, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(19)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(20)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(21)U.S. and Canada, Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s about Abednego Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(22)England, Select Deaths and Burials, 1538-1991 about Henry Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(23)Randy McConnell, “Early Inmans of the South,” (1994). Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(24)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(25)Tennessee Divorce and Other Records, 1800-1965 about Hezekiah Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(26)Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002 about Eliza Branch [Note: Hezekiah’s name is mistyped “Ezekiel”]. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(27)United States Federal Census for 1830 about Hezekiah Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(28)United States Federal Census for 1840 about Hezekiah Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(29)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(30)1800 Federal Census for Burke County, North Carolina—Henry Inman. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(31)United States Federal Census for 1820 Concerning Samuel Inman, Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(32)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, A Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(33)Burke County, North Carolina Deed Book, referencing Philip Burns Deed, 1778.
(34)Inman-Spence-Beall-Warfield Family Branches, a Private Tree. Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah. Date Accessed: July 31, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com
(35)“Comment on Another Tree” by Cora Louesa Williams Duvall—added by jenuine1 27 Oct 2009. Ancestry.com, Provo Utah. Date Accessed: August 1, 2014. Available online at http://www.ancestry.com

5 thoughts on “Elisha Spence (1776-1835)–Part Three: The Burke County, North Carolina Inman Family

  1. My great grand father was James Lafayette Inman. His Grandmother was suppose to be full blooded Blackfoot Indian. I’m trying to get more info. I know we are suppose to be descendents of Abednego Inman. My great grandmother, Nancy belle Dycus’s mother was suppose to be full blooded Cherokee Indian. If you have any more info. I’d appreciate it, I think my great great grandfathers’ name was samual Edward Inman.

    • I was just working on an Inman connection with the Pewett line today. (I’m an Inman on both sides of the family. On my father’s line, I descend from Edward Inman of Rhode Island. And on my mother’s side, I descend from Hezekiah Inman of Burke County, NC.) This particular line I was working on came down through Meshach Inman, Abednego’s brother. The Pewetts intermarried with my mother’s Spence line. They are distant cousins. It seems these families continually intermarried. I will keep my eye out for your Nancybelle Dycus and will get back with you if I can find anything.

  2. Barbara, I am so pleased to know that you have finally succeeded in identifying the origins of those three INMAN brothers with the fantastic names! I am a direct descendant of the Nidderdale (Yorkshire) Inmans, and I would simply not accept that they were connected as so many people have claimed – and still claim. I think you and I may have crossed swords over this is the past! It is interesting that years back I had some contact with a descendant of the Inmans from the parish of Burnsall, (I think this person lived in York) and if you wish I could put you in contact with her. I have enjoyed reading the record of your Inman search. Thankyou. Nancy McLaughlin riversidenz@gmail.com

    • I remember reading a microfilmed copy of the early account that set everyone off in the wrong direction (including me), and back in those days, I believed it. Then I found out it was full of errors. I had a ten year break from genealogy. When I returned to it, I was determined to find out the truth. One other thing that bothered me about the narrative was whether these three brothers were actually with Daniel Boone on that hunting trip. So I bought a newer, well-researched biography of Daniel Boone. I think the three brothers were with Boone’s brother-in-law on that trip. They were returning from New Orleans when they were attacked. Another big problem I had after returning to genealogy was finding any connection with Robert Inman of Virginia. I did the Ancestry DNA test, and also went through Gedmatch. No Robert Inman. So I went back to the drawing board and started from scratch. DNA confirms my new discoveries, so I can now give that Inman line a rest. Thank you for your message.

  3. Thank you so much for the information. I’ve just started delving into my Inman Family history and was able to stumble upon the stories of the 3 Inman brothers. I am a descendant of Meshach. His son Lazarus Inman was my 7X great grandfather. Making Meshach my 8x great grandfather.

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